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eBook Make the Night Hideous: Four English-Canadian Charivaris, 1881-1940 (Canadian Social History Series) download

by Pauline Greenhill

eBook Make the Night Hideous: Four English-Canadian Charivaris, 1881-1940 (Canadian Social History Series) download ISBN: 1442640774
Author: Pauline Greenhill
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1 edition (November 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1217 kb
Fb2: 1175 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt lit lrf lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

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The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Series: Canadian Social History Series. Published by: University of Toronto Press. eISBN: 978-1-4426-8601-4.

April 13, 2011 ·. Views of Avonlea, Saskatchewan, site of the Babcock charivari. April 6, 2011 ·. Nova Scotia Charivari.

Pauline Greenhill is a professor in the Department of Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Winnipeg. Country of Publication. History & Military.

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Greenhill, Pauline.

An short exploration of 'charivari' as described in the Roman de Fauvel, with historical and contemporary examples from across the centuries. Organised by Professor Emma Dillon, KCL Music Department.

By Pauline Greenhill. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010. An short exploration of 'charivari' as described in the Roman de Fauvel, with historical and contemporary examples from across the centuries. Organised by Professor Emma Dillon, KCL Music Department more.

Pauline Greenhill is professor of women's and gender studies at the University of Winnipeg.

Encyclopedia of Women’s Folklore and Folklife, 2 volumes. Wanting (To Be) Animal: Fairy-Tale Transbiology in The StoryTeller. Feral Feminisms 2:29-45. 2012 "Dressing Up and Dressing Down: Costumes, Risky Play, Transgender and Maritime English Canadian Charivari Paradoxes. 2011 (Steven Kohm, co-author. Pedophile Crime Films as Popular Criminology: A Problem of Justice?

Kendra Magnus-Johnston is an interdisciplinary studies doctoral student at the University of Manitoba. She holds a master’s degree in cultural studies and an undergraduate degree in rhetoric and communications from the University of Winnipeg. Historically, scholars of folklore understood fairy tales as traditional narratives of wonder and magic transmitted not only orally, but also informally, locally, and face-to-face within communities and social groups.

Charivari (or shivaree or chivaree) or skimmington (or skimmington ride in England; German: Katzenmusik) was a folk custom in which a mock parade was staged through a community accompanied by a discordant mock serenade. Since the crowd aimed to make. Since the crowd aimed to make as much noise as possible by beating on pots and pans or anything that came to hand these parades are often referred to as rough music. Parades were of three types.

The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom from members of a community, usually to a newlywed couple, accompanied by a quête (a request for a treat or money in exchange for the noisy performance) and/or pranks. Up to the first decades of the twentieth century, charivaris were for the most part enacted to express disapproval of the relationship that was their focus, such as those between individuals of different ages, races, or religions. While later charivaris maintained the same rituals, their meaning changed to a welcoming of the marriage.

Make the Night Hideous explores this mysterious transformation using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants. Pauline Greenhill's unique and fascinating work explores the malleability of a tradition, its continuing value, and its contestation in a variety of discourses.