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eBook Amoskeag: Life and Work in an American Factory-City (Pantheon Village Series) download

by Tamara K. Hareven

eBook Amoskeag: Life and Work in an American Factory-City (Pantheon Village Series) download ISBN: 0394738551
Author: Tamara K. Hareven
Publisher: Pantheon; 1st paperback ed edition (February 12, 1980)
Language: English
Pages: 394
ePub: 1710 kb
Fb2: 1934 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi mbr docx txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Hareven, Tamara K; Langenbach, Randolph, 1945- joint author. New York : Pantheon Books. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City.

Hareven, Tamara K; Langenbach, Randolph, 1945- joint author. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

TAMARA K. HAREVEN is Unidel Professor of Family Studies and History, University of Delaware, and . HAREVEN is Unidel Professor of Family Studies and History, University of Delaware, and Visiting Scholar in sociology at Harvard University. She is founder of the Journal of Family History and President of the Social Science History Association. His articles and photographs have been published in numerous books and magazines; and his book, A Future From the Past, was published by the . Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Tamara Hareven, one of the most intelligent and prolific among contemporary historians of the family, has disclosed something of the life and work patterns of men and women in a great mill

Tamara Hareven, one of the most intelligent and prolific among contemporary historians of the family, has disclosed something of the life and work patterns of men and women in a great mill. In the course of it, she has also warned us about the insufficiency of simple formulas, the complexity of men and societies, and we are in her debt for it. -New Republic. Start reading Amoskeag on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Amoskeag: Life and Work in an American Factory-City. By Tamara K. Hareven and Randolph Langenbach. New York: Pantheon Books, 1978. University of South Carolina.

Start by marking Amoskeag: Life and Work in an American . A series of interviews with workers at a huge factory in Amoskeag.

Start by marking Amoskeag: Life and Work in an American Factory-City as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. When this first came out I used Hareven's Amoskeag, about the huge NH mill, to teach Freshman Composition in Fall River, a larger mill city, though with no one mill so massive. Hareven, Tamara & Randolph Langenbach (Pantheon, 1978). Amoskeag Manufacturing Company of Manchester, . comes to life through the voices of its former employees, who described what it was like working in the mills early in the 20th century. This oral history is enhanced by photographs of the factory buildings & the people who worked in them.

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Fifty years later the Amoskeag complex was the largest textile factory in the world. They talk about their work, their living conditions, their family life, and what they have learned: ""If I had my life all over again, I wouldn't be in the mill. In another fifty years Amoskeag closed down, throwing 17,000 people out of work. This book records the oral history of some of those people and their forebears, most of them now dead. Eventually, after labor battles in the Twenties, the mills close, but not until the owners have squirreled millions in profits in their own private hole.

City of Fallen Angels. More by Tamara K. Hareven. Anonymous Americans Explorations In Nineteenth-century social history. Ageing and Life Course Transitions. Tamara K. Hareven, Kathleen J. Adams. Eleanor Roosevelt: An American Conscience (Franklin D. Roosevelt and the era of the New Deal). Family and Kin in Urban Communities, 1700-1930. Transitions: The Family and the Life Crisis in Historical Perspective (Studies in social discontinuity).

Interviews with workers and their families help recreate what life was like in the industrial town of Amoskeag, New Hampshire
Comments: (7)
Celace
My 4 star rating is based on the fact that, though writing for a limited audience's interest in a limited area of American history, the book is well researched, illustrated and presents some new information on the conduct of 19th century east coast mill communities. The rise and decline of the Amoskeag operation has many unique features not shared by any other mill towns or cities in the world at the time. Excellent material for a college thesis, a historical society program or an introduction for a new Merrimack River enthusiast.
Tujar
I've read another book on mills in the south, and this was definitely better - less repetitive, and individual people's stories more interesting. Learned a lot about the operation of the mills plus the whole organization as a "benevolent family"; the many things the owners provided for the workers in a day when people didn't have much. The size of the operation and the number of employees was staggering. Very interesting to find that many of the the employees came as immigrants specifically to work in the mills, and stayed in their ethnic groups. The Scots, for instance, were the skilled weavers of gingham. The French came from Canada for better living and sent for their relatives. The Greeks and the Poles learned English and assimilated faster, but the French kept their language and stayed together more. An informative and worthwhile book.
Foxanayn
If you love history you will love this book about the mills in Manchester, NH
Iseared
A wealth of first-person interviews with former mill workers.
Togar
Highly recommended
Galubel
book arrived promptly and was exactly as described
Oveley
excellent
Nineteenth century American travellers waxed enthusiastic or properly melancholic amidst the ruins of Europe. Writers such as Henry James often contrasted the youth and vigor (and innocence) of America with old, tired Europe. None of them could have imagined that less than a century later, the busy New England mills that turned out huge quantities of shoes, textiles, and useful products of all kinds would be silent, weed-strewn ruins. When I look around at cities like Salem, Lynn, Lowell, Lawrence, and Brockton, Mass., at Manchester and Nashua, New Hampshire, at a dozen small towns in Maine, I realize that I grew up during the fall of a whole civilization. I saw the tail end of it. Today so many of those thriving factories and mills have been razed to the ground, turned into condos or specialty shops, or even, into museums of industrial history.
AMOSKEAG is the story of one textile mill, once the largest in the world, along the banks of the Merrimack River in New Hampshire. The story is told through 37 interviews after an introduction of thirty-odd pages. The effect is most immediate: you feel as if you had lived the whole experience, grown up around these people. The reader is taken through the lives of management to the world of work---the varieties of tasks and social interactions to be found within the giant factory. Then we get an idea of family life, how the factory permeated every aspect of existence, and finally of the strikes, shutdowns and rising costs that eventually drove the mill out of existence (or rather, the whole textile industry to other states and countries). The text is punctuated by numerous black and white photographs which add to the atmosphere of "bygone days" that emanates from the whole book. If you are looking for a book on industrial history or early 20th century New England, you must read this one, it's unforgettable.