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by Marilyn Irvin Holt

eBook The Orphan Trains: Placing Out in America download ISBN: 0803223609
Author: Marilyn Irvin Holt
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (June 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1117 kb
Fb2: 1101 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi azw azw mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Marilyn Irvin Holt, former director of publicati Setting aside our present-day romantic notions about orphan trains, Holt's book sheds valuable new light on the phenomenon by putting it in the context of nineteenth-century ideals about childhood, the roles of social reformers, the changing.

Marilyn Irvin Holt, former director of publicati Setting aside our present-day romantic notions about orphan trains, Holt's book sheds valuable new light on the phenomenon by putting it in the context of nineteenth-century ideals about childhood, the roles of social reformers, the changing theories of relief and welfare for the poor, western development, and rail expansion.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Orphan Trains: Placing out in America. From 1850 to 1930 America witnessed a unique emigration and resettlement of at least 200,000 children and several thousand adults, primarily from the East Coast to the West

Home Browse Books Book details, The Orphan Trains: Placing out in America. The Orphan Trains: Placing out in America. By Marilyn Irvin Holt. From 1850 to 1930 America witnessed a unique emigration and resettlement of at least 200,000 children and several thousand adults, primarily from the East Coast to the West. This 'placing out,' an attempt to find homes for the urban poor, was best known by the 'orphan trains' that carried the children. Holt carefully analyzes the system, initially instituted by the New York Children's Aid Society in 1853, tracking its imitators as well as the reasons for its creation and demise.

several thousand adults, primarily from the East Coast to the West.

This 'placing out, ' an attempt to find homes for the urban poor, was best known by the 'orphan trains' that carried the children. I had never heard of the Orphan Trains until I visited the Little White House in Warm Springs, GA. This book provides the history of adopting out children.

by Marilyn Irvin Holt. From 1850 to 1930 America witnessed a unique emigration and resettlement of at least 200,000 children and several thousand adults, primarily from the East Coast to the West

by Marilyn Irvin Holt.

The trains that carried the children to their new homes became known as the 'orphan trains' ISBN: 0803223609 (Orphans, Urban Poor). Wright, Leonard M. Where The Fish Are: The New York Times Fish-Finding Book. Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Blackmarr, Amy. Going To Ground: Simple Life on a Georgia Pond. Genius In Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker.

The Orphan Trains: Placing out in America. Lela B. Costin, "The Orphan Trains: Placing out in America.

The Orphan Trains: Placing Out in America by Marilyn Irvin Holt. Indiana Magazine of History.

This 'placing out, ' an attempt to find homes for the urban poor, was best known by the 'orphan trains' that . It is good, scholarly social history

This 'placing out, ' an attempt to find homes for the urban poor, was best known by the 'orphan trains' that carried the children. It is good, scholarly social history.

"From 1850 to 1930 America witnessed a unique emigration and resettlement of at least 200,000 children and several thousand adults, primarily from the East Coast to the West. This 'placing out,' an attempt to find homes for the urban poor, was best known by the 'orphan trains' that carried the children. Holt carefully analyzes the system, initially instituted by the New York Children's Aid Society in 1853, tracking its imitators as well as the reasons for its creation and demise. She captures the children's perspective with the judicious use of oral histories, institutional records, and newspaper accounts. This well-written volume sheds new light on the multifaceted experience of children's immigration, changing concepts of welfare, and Western expansion. It is good, scholarly social history." - "Library Journal". "Soon there will be no memories of the 'little companies,' as they were called, of children setting out with an adult leader for a new life. This little book is kind of a preservation movement, and a contribution to our understanding of how the West was won." - David Shribman, "Wall Street Journal". "As a portrait of the time's charitable networks, "The Orphan Trains" succeeds...[Holt's] work brings to light a meaningful concept: the idea that charity; then and now, is sometimes tinged with greed, indifference, hostility, self-promotion and is an institution that can serve the giver more than the receiver." - David James Rose, "Washington Times". Marilyn Irvin Holt, former director of publications at the Kansas State Historical Society; is a freelance editor, writer, and researcher and teaches historical editing at the University of Kansas.
Comments: (7)
Kieel
This is a well researched, clearly written effort to understand a major event in US history that is little understood. My grandfather and his brother were on an orphan train that left NYC and went to the Northernmost area of NY around the turn of the century. There my grandfather, the youngest and smallest of the children, was finally taken by a childless farm couple. His life was hard but this book brings home the question he might well have asked himself . . . was it better to have been worked so very hard by a miserable (?) old man until he was old enough to leave or have remained in poverty surrounded by disease with no one able to care for him? And, at least Mrs. W was apparently kind to him. That must have been worth a lot. We know very few details so reading this book (even though it reads like a PH.D. dissertation) gave us some insights. With any luck, this book will unlock some untold stories of these children.
Celace
This was a gift for a friend whose family "adopted" an orphan from the train in 1920s South Dakota when she was a small child and did not really understand why all of a sudden she had a new "sister." She enjoyed learning some of the history behind the event and told me she would recommend both books to others who want to learn more about this little known part of US history. She read this book along with "We Rode the Orphan Trains," which shared personal stories of these children.
Lavivan
The Orphan Trains, by Marilyn Irvin Holt, is simply excellent. The book is extremely well-written and absolutely riveting. Holt carefully documents her work.

I particularly enjoyed the author's discussion of how child rearing views were changing during this time in American history. It was fascinating to read because it clearly paves the way for why the "placing out" of these children was seen as such an excellent idea. Shipping these children off to other parts of the country seemed completely justifiable when one considers the alternative facing these children. Indeed, the idea of "placing out" isn't so bad considering what happens to so many young children now raised in poverty in the ghettos of this nation.

The United States was not the first country to come up with the idea of placing out. Holt points out that other countries also used this idea for "getting rid" of the impoverished. In this country, however, placing out definitely was a movement that started with well meaning motives. The idea was to salvage these often abandoned, neglected impoverished children and send them to good homes in the West where, coincidentally, their labor was also often needed.

Holt's discussion of this event is just extremely well presented. She is factual and not judgmental. I'd highly recommend this book to anyone who's interested in societal changes. From this episode in history came the beginnings of social work. It also raises interesting questions about how children are dealt with nowadays where they are often left with birth parents to the extreme detriment of the child. It makes placing out seem rather desirable.
BeatHoWin
The concept was great, and I learned a lot about a part of American history that I had been unaware of. The 3 stars is not due to it being 'bad,' but based on the a missed opportunity to take the research farther into the future that these children and the communities that took them in faced. I found myself skimming the content rather than really being engaged.
Bluddefender
I had never heard of the Orphan Trains until I visited the Little White House in Warm Springs, GA. This book provides the history of adopting out children. The whole concept of giving away ones children due to financial hardships is hard to grip, but this book provides a look from the child's eye to the situation.
Meztisho
Very interesting book. I have enjoyed reading so far.
Nalmetus
What a very interesting book documenting the overall process. Well written and very well documented. I would never had believed that we exported children from East coast into the Midwest in such great numbers. Well worth reading
Yes. My interest in this subject began with ORPHAN TRAIN by Christina BakerKline. The ORPHAN TRAINS had real information that satisfied my curiosity. I am glad to have both books in our home library.