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eBook New York Central Railroad (MBI Railroad Color History) download

by Mike Schafer,Brian Solomon

eBook New York Central Railroad (MBI Railroad Color History) download ISBN: 0760329281
Author: Mike Schafer,Brian Solomon
Publisher: Voyageur Press; 1st edition (August 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1248 kb
Fb2: 1518 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: docx doc mobi txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

New York Central Railroad showcases engines classes, stations, and the changing landscape as supporting players to the rise and fall of the line, reflecting changes taking place in the economy as well as the political scene

New York Central Railroad showcases engines classes, stations, and the changing landscape as supporting players to the rise and fall of the line, reflecting changes taking place in the economy as well as the political scene. The result is an eminently pleasing volume modelers are certain to profit from.

I own the book Pennsylvania Railroad by Mike Schafer and Brian Solomon. The book describes the rich history of the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1846 through its 1968 Merger with the New York Central as well as today's modern railroad scene

I own the book Pennsylvania Railroad by Mike Schafer and Brian Solomon. The book describes the rich history of the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1846 through its 1968 Merger with the New York Central as well as today's modern railroad scene. The book has excellent color photographs of the "Spirit of St. Louis" passenger train. The book has excellent color and black and white photos of St. Louis Union Station and Penn Station in New York City. The book has a Table of Contents page and an index.

New York Central Railroad book. New York Central Railroad (MBI Railroad Color History). 0760329281 (ISBN13: 9780760329283).

New York Central Railroad MBI Railroad Color History.

NEW YORK CENTRAL Railroad: MBI Railroad Color History NEW BOOK/Original Printing.

Find nearly any book by Mike Schafer. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Brian Solomon, Mike Schafer. ISBN 9780760329283 (978-0-7603-2928-3) Hardcover, Voyageur Press, 2007. Railroads you can model.

What others are saying. What others are saying

What others are saying. 1943 New York Central train railroad print ad The Caboose cut-away view of the works. Train Truck Covered Wagon Electric Train Train Pictures Old Trains Train Engines Diesel Locomotive Steam Engine Train Travel. What others are saying. The interior of the original McKim Mead & White Penn Station building in It was demolished in Collection of the New-York Historical Society. Modern Girls & Old Fashioned Men. We are four girls with a penchant for the best in life.

Amtrak (MBI Railroad Color History). Few states have a railroad heritage as rich as Pennsylvanias

Amtrak (MBI Railroad Color History). This pictorial history is only the second of its kind to trace the 30-plus-year history of Amtrak, beginning with a look at the rise and fall of privately run passenger train service followed by a look at Amtrak's infant stage from 1971 through 1976. Few states have a railroad heritage as rich as Pennsylvanias. This illustrated book offers a colorful look at the Keystone States historic railroads, the men who built and ran them, and the engineering feats that made them possible.

The New York Central Railroad rivaled the Pennsylvania Railroad and was organized by the Commodore  . A new form of business organization An enterprise as costly as building a railroad demanded more money than any one individual could invest.

The New York Central Railroad rivaled the Pennsylvania Railroad and was organized by the Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. The New York Central Railroad went from New York City to Albany and Buffalo and then from Buffalo to both Cleveland and Chicago as well as to Indianapolis and the Ohio Railroad. The other two trunk lines included the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (previous slide) and the Erie Railroad.

For decades the New York Central reigned as one of Americas most important railroads. Beginning with the 1853 consolidation of a group of fledgling railways that formed a route from Buffalo to Albany, the New York Central grew into a powerhouse transportation company with more than 10,000 route miles. This illustrated history of the railroad that grew to power under the Vanderbilt dynasty covers every aspect of the New York Central through its 1968 merger with longtime rival Pennsylvania Railroad and the eventual merger of Penn Centrals successor, Conrail, into Norfolk Southern and CSX. Along the way, readers are treated to a selection of archival photographs, commissioned route maps, period ads, and timetables detailing all of New York Centrals operations--steam and diesel, freight and passenger--not to mention associated icons like Grand Central Terminal, the legendary Henry Dreyfuss shrouded Hudson steam locomotives, the Water Level Route, and the 20th Century Limited passenger trains. Prolific railway author Brian Solomon sources 150 evocative photographs, promotional materials, and postcards not included in the previous edition to deliver a nostalgic and colorful look at the New York Central. In addition, there are four specially commissioned maps.

Comments: (7)
Grinin
This is another research book for me to use while writing articles for my website blog. These articles are on old farm tractors and farm machinery. Often I include in these articles a short excerpt on the progress of the tractor or farm machine from the factory to the dealership. One of those articles which has obtained the most "hits" on the website is a story on the PAPEC Company of Shortsville, New York. PAPEC was the manufacturer of silo fillers. Thus, in my two-part article on the PAPEC Model 127 silo filler, the railroad that carried the particular Model 127 silo filler that was the subject of the articles was loaded aboard a New York Central railroad box car and shipped to Chicago, where the baox car was transferred to another railroad for shipment to the Minnesota Lake, Minnesota dealership.

I have collected a great number of the books in this series on railroads of America. The best part for me is the fact that the books all contain maps of the railroad network and the small towns that the tracks passed through.
Phenade
If you are a budding fan of New York railroads, this book is a good place to start. It is an easy read with dozens of nice photos.

If you own several other New York Central books, however, you may not find much new here. It could have been written by referencing just two prior books about the railroad, plus a bit of updating from the internet. There are also some pesky grammatical and spelling errors that detract from an otherwise pleasing book.

Recommended for teens and young adults who are just becoming interested in railroad history. "Old timers" and rail experts can probably bypass this one.
White gold
The illustrations of this edition, MBI Publishing, 1999, paperback, are crisp. The book provides information about complex merger history and outline of nineteenth and twentieth century history of company as well as description of routes and motive power and interesting chapter on GCT.
The book provides basic general information of a wide encompassing primer on the topic of this railroad. It does not go into details of track configurations of terminals, yards or stations,nor on the form of any of the many smaller stations and terminals themselves within the system, nor on the detail make-up of consists. But, it is a useful and concise overview of New York Central and its achievements.
Kajikus
This is a great short history of the New York Central System. Chapters 1 to 4 deal with the makeup of the system and history. Chapter 5 deals with Grand Central Terminal and New York electrification. Chapter 6 is the steam locomotive fleet. Chapter 7 is the diesel locomotives. Chapter 8 is the electric locomotives. Chapters 9 & 10 are about the freight and passenger service. The pictures used in the book are great. The amount of information is remarkable. If I were to purchase only one book on the New York Central System, this would be the book.
Porgisk
This is a great book on Norfolk southern . My grandpas was a engineer at southern for thirty years . He took me for rides on the big engines . So reading this book brings back some good times for me. If you like trains you will love this book.
Sharpbinder
These books are a good reference for the average railroad buff. Not too in depth but gives you a good insight and some very good photographs...
Tane
Already owning the 1999 original edition I decided to buy the new edition because it was expanded. The changes though are not totally to my liking. The print is smaller, the original system map that was from an actual New York Central timetable has been replaced by an unofficial map produced for the book. The book says it has been re-illustrated, which is certainly the case. There are many new photos and post card views. Whether they are better or worse is of course in the eye of the beholder, I for one prefer the older edition's pictures. Perhaps more importantly the new pictures are not as crisp and sharp as the ones in the 1999 edition. At first I thought it was a botched printing but I could not see any evidence of that. Large pictures that take up two separate pages have the same somewhat blurry quality on both pages. I am not in the position to inspect additional copies of the book to see if the printing quality is better in any of them so I only state it as a possible problem. Overall, based on my experience, if you have the older book this expanded edition is probably not worth the price. If you don't have either then consider the 1999 edition if you prefer sharp pictures.
Good photos, but like most of Brian's books it comes up short on scholarship. Anyone looking for the definitive history of the NYC needs to look elsewhere--or perhaps write it themselves.