carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » And Grace Will Lead Me Home: African American Freedmen Communities of Austin, Texas, 1865–1928

eBook And Grace Will Lead Me Home: African American Freedmen Communities of Austin, Texas, 1865–1928 download

by Michelle M. Mears

eBook And Grace Will Lead Me Home: African American Freedmen Communities of Austin, Texas, 1865–1928 download ISBN: 0896726541
Author: Michelle M. Mears
Publisher: Texas Tech University Press; First Edition edition (June 25, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1891 kb
Fb2: 1836 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr doc lrf lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928 .

At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928 when the city implemented a master plan that encouraged b. .acks to move into a single, racially-segregated section of town. Covering the births and deaths of these communities, And Grace Will Lead Me Home also illuminates what life was like for African Americans who lived there. Michelle M. Mears s careful combing of archival sources fleshes out life s amenities as well as the essentials of life for freedmen and their families.

2000; a topic she became interested in while working on a master’s thesis

2000; a topic she became interested in while working on a master’s thesis. And Grace Will Lead Me Home is a part of a series of upcoming programs designed to introduce the community to the Carver’s new core exhibit The African American Presence in 19th Century Texas that will open in early 2020. This event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, call (512) 974-4926.

At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928-when the city implemented a master plan that encouraged blacks to move into a single, racially-segregated section of town. Mears's careful combing of archival sources fleshes out life's amenities as well as the essentials of life for freedmen and their families.

Focuses on the history of black freedmen communities in Austin, Texas, from 1865 to 1928. After emancipation at least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin and nearby rural settlements, disappearing by 1928. Covers the births and deaths of these communities; also describes the lives of those who lived there" Provided by publisher. Rubrics: Freedmen Texas Austin History 19th century African American neighborhoods History 20th century.

Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Michelle M. Mears. And Grace Will Lead Me Home: African American Freedmen Communities of Austin, Texas, 1865a?1928 by Michelle M. Mears (2009-06-25). by Michelle M.

Book Overview At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby.

And Grace Will Lead Me Home : African American Freedmen Communities of Austin, Texas, 1865-1928. At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928 when the city implemented a master plan that encouraged blacks to move into a single, racially-segregated section of town.

Michelle Mears's book on the rural and urban freedmen settlements of Austin is a welcome contribution to the social history of African Americans in Texas. By considering postemancipation black lifeways at such a small scale, as few existing works do, it offers readers a more comprehensive view of the experiences, struggles, and accomplishments of African Americans within a specific historical.

23. Becoming iron men: the story of the 1963 Loyola Ramblers Z TT422

A history of African-American families and slaveholders in Cass County, East Texas, from the colonial days and slavery to the 21st century 97. 195 W255h MAIN. 9. Austin’s Rosewood neighborhood 97. 31 R524au MAIN. 23. Becoming iron men: the story of the 1963 Loyola Ramblers Z TT422. 8 F875be TXD. 24. And grace will lead me home: African American freedmen communities of Austin, Texas, 1865-1928 Z TT422. 8 M463AN TXD. 25. Thursday night lights: the story of Black high school football in Texas Z UA380.

History of African Americans in Austin. During the Reconstruction Era, newly emanicipated African American slaves began moving from rural areas into towns and cities to establish Freedmen's Towns. During the Reconstruction Era, newly emanicipated African American slaves began moving from rural areas into towns and cities to establish Freedmen's Towns (also known as freedmantowns). Several such communities existed in Austin, Texas including Clarksville, Wheatsville, Masontown and Kicheonville.

Austin American-Statesman: Even Austin newcomers will recognize the name Wheatville, if only because of.

Austin American-Statesman: Even Austin newcomers will recognize the name Wheatville, if only because of Wheatsville, the food market that bears the ever-so-proximate name. Others can quickly tell you, too, that Clarksville is a mostly residential area west of downtown, although long-timers often argue about its exact boundaries. Some locals can explain that Wheatville and Clarksville were once freedmen’s communities, established by former slaves after the Civil War. How many, though, can name and locate the 13 other freedmen’s communities now within Austin’s city limits?

After the Civil War ended in 1865, many freed slaves in central Texas began new lives in or near the capital city. At least fifteen freedmen communities formed in Austin proper and nearby rural settlements, but most, for various reasons, had disappeared by 1928—when the city implemented a master plan that encouraged blacks to move into a single, racially-segregated section of town. Covering the births and deaths of these communities, And Grace Will Lead Me Home also illuminates what life was like for African Americans who lived there. Michelle M. Mears’s careful combing of archival sources fleshes out life’s amenities as well as the essentials of life for freedmen and their families.
Comments: (3)
Fato
I am a Certified Historic House Specialist REALTOR in Austin Texas and I love Texas and local history. This is a sad but true history of many Austin, Texas neighborhoods.
Anardred
Thanks to "archival collections [offering] substantial resources," Mears is able to give an unprecedented view of the African American communities in Austin from their beginnings at the end of the Civil War until their were broken up from large-scale city planning in the 1920s. These communities were established on the outskirts of the city usually in conjunction with land owned by blacks where freed slaves felt more secure than in the largely unsettled countryside. And in fact while the communities were not free from the discrimination nor threats of violence, these were not so severe as elsewhere throughout Texas and the Southern states. In Austin, the communities were able to grow and provide basics such as employment, food, and shelter; and there were educational opportunities at black schools.

The details of Mears's picture affirm the range and content of her sources. Appendices include the dates of the establishment of urban and rural communities, their churches, number of inhabitants (from less than 200 to over 1,200), number of persons in different employment such as blacksmith, brick mason, cook in private home or public place, teacher, preacher or minister, and deaths of many residents and their causes. Mears elaborates on such bare facts as found in the appendices in the text with attention to particular communities, additional statistics, and profiles of individuals or vignettes of aspects of the life in a community. Old maps or area views give one a visual notion of the communities which enhances the author's portrait of them and their development.

Mears has been doing research of African Americans in the Austin area for many years as an archivist at the U. of North Texas. She has also held positions as an archivist or librarian at other Texas institutions. Her work is practically pure sociology. Her aim is an organized record of the African American communities with limited authoritative commentary; instead of a thematic study of violence against the freed slaves or their role in shaping the area where they congregated as in many books by historians and writers on African American studies, for example. Despite not straying far from the facts as abundantly contained in her sources, Mears's book is lively and informative throughout and colorful in spots for presenting newly-discovered material bringing to life bustling and innovative communities.
Fenrikree
A wonderful book, a must-read for anyone interested in the history of Austin's freedmen communities, Reconstruction, or African American Texas history.