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eBook Rio de Janeiro (Writer and the City) download

by Ruy Castro

eBook Rio de Janeiro (Writer and the City) download ISBN: 1582341907
Author: Ruy Castro
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; 1st Edition edition (August 7, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1106 kb
Fb2: 1685 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf mobi lrf docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Rio de Janeiro City Brazil - Продолжительность: 6:30 Gil Carosio Recommended for you.

Rio de Janeiro City Brazil - Продолжительность: 6:30 Gil Carosio Recommended for you. 6:30. 25 Best Places to Visit in Europe - Travel Europe - Продолжительность: 25:55 touropia Recommended for you. 25:55. Carnival Rio de Janeiro Stunning Parade!

The fifth book in Bloomsbury's the Writer and the City series is no dry travelogue, dutifully reciting the . Castro takes us from Amerigo Vespucci's arrival in Brazil in 1502 to the 17th- and 18th-century battles for control of Rio, recounting colonial-era maneuvering with an ear for irony.

The fifth book in Bloomsbury's the Writer and the City series is no dry travelogue, dutifully reciting the requisite tourist attractions and eating and drinking establishments. His musical chronicles follow the Belle Époque and the first hit samba in the 1960s Carnival, "The Girl from Ipanema. He also recounts the drug wars and the growth of the hillside favela slums.

Ruy Castro delves into the past and present of Rio, where even in periods of comparative calm there has . In this spellbinding fifth entry in Bloomsbury's The Writer and the City series, Rio de Janeiro's vibrant history unfolds.

Ruy Castro delves into the past and present of Rio, where even in periods of comparative calm there has always been a palpable excitement in the air - the feeling of a city on fire. While stiff-collared poets flirted with prim young ladies in coffeehouses during the belle époque, revolts were being plotted that almost destroyed the city.

Start reading Rio de Janeiro: A City on Fire (Writer and the City) on your Kindle in under a minute. Ruy Castro writes, in a good-humored and elegant style, a guide to the carioca soul: a fresh, original and colorful view of the city and the people that make it the best place to live in the world. 15 people found this helpful.

Start by marking Rio de Janeiro (Writer and the City) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Occupying what is arguably the most breathtakingly beautiful site in the world, the people of Rio - the Cariocas - tell their stories: of cannibals charming European intellectuals; of elegant slaves and their shabby masters; of how a casual chat between two people drinking coffee on Avenida Rio Branco could affect world coffee markets; of an awesome beach life; of favelas, drugs, police, carnival, football and music. With his own Carioca good humour and spellbinding storytelling gifts, Ruy Castro brings the reader thrillingly close to the flames.

Электронная книга "Rio de Janeiro: A City on Fire", Ruy Castro

Электронная книга "Rio de Janeiro: A City on Fire", Ruy Castro. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Rio de Janeiro: A City on Fire" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Rio de Janeiro's complex story is hard to unravel, but these books will give you a glimpse into the city's fascinating . The Brazilian Sound: Samba, Bossa Nova and the Popular Music of Brazil by Chris McGowan.

Rio de Janeiro's complex story is hard to unravel, but these books will give you a glimpse into the city's fascinating history. A city defined by Carnival, samba and the birthplace of some of Brazil’s most inspiring and celebrated musicians and songs, understanding Brazilian music is one of the keys to understanding Rio de Janeiro. This book explores Brazil’s rich music including the history of the country’s famous genres, the notable musicians and their global impact.

Drawing on Rio De Janeiro's past, this work shows that even in periods of comparative calm, there has always been a palpable excitement in the air - the feeling of a carnival under fire.

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Ruy Castro delves into the past and present of Rio, where even in periods of comparative calm there has always been a palpable excitement in the air - the feeling of a city on fire.

In this spellbinding fifth entry in Bloomsbury's The Writer and the City series, Rio de Janeiro's vibrant history unfolds. While stiff-collared poets flirted with prim young ladies in coffeehouses during the belle époque, revolts were being plotted that almost destroyed the city. We learn how the iconic wave-patterned mosaics of Copacabana pavements were baptized with blood, and how more than a hundred years before the girl from Ipanema passed by, the girls from Ouvidor Street adopted French chic - and never really gave it up. From what is arguably the most breathtakingly beautiful city in the world, the people of Rio - the Cariocas - tell their stories: of cannibals charming European intellectuals; of elegant slaves and their shabby masters; of how a casual chat between two people drinking coffee on Avenida Rio Branco could affect world coffee markets; of an awe-inspiring beach life; of favelas, drugs, police, carnival, football, and music. With his own Carioca good humor and great storytelling gifts, Ruy Castro brings the reader thrillingly close to the flames.

Comments: (7)
Whitestone
Castro is a fair writer, presenting an honest view of the city. I've never been, so I cannot base this on my own experiences. The book presents a little bit of everything which seems to be central to Rio: the nightlife, Carnival, the cuisine and, most importantly for me, the history. The problem with small books such as this one, which in a standard layout would maybe top 130 pages, is that the writer is prohibited from straying from the main path of introducing the city to the reader. I would say this book is the equivalent of spending two days in a major city - seeing the major sights, creating opinions and generalizations without really getting to know any citizen or neighborhood too well. However, the book did succeed in what I took as its major goal: to get the reader to go to Rio. Brazil is now definitely near the top of my travel list.
Thordigda
I love books like these over a typical guidebook when preparing for a trip to a new place. This book did not disappoint and I am now even more excited for my trip to Rio!
Abuseyourdna
Those who loved Castro's book about Bossa Nova, might find his book about Rio a bit thin. No photos, less details and not many anecdotes from the last decade. Still "Carnival under Fire" offered interesting knowledge about Rio's fascinating history. And Ruy Castro knows how to write.
Aradwyn
The city has an eclectic past that comes to life in Castro's virtual historic tour of the last 500 years
Bele
brilliant little book. too bad the author has become a fascist in his old age.
Burirus
Ruy Castro's slim volume on Rio de Janeiro provides the casual reader a compelling portrait of that most intriguing of cities. Providing a rapid history of the city from the first Portuguese explorers to the celebrations of the dawn of the 21st century, he tells the tale of a city that has at times been the height of fashion, that has provided the world with at least its share of memorable movie scenes, more than its requisite portion of compelling rhythms, and a plentiful supply of legends, scandalous and otherwise.

Seemingly influenced by the flaneur approach to writing on cities (though not adopting the majority of that form's conventions) and with the long memory that comes of living in and loving a city for his whole natural life, Castro gives plentiful insight into a genteel experience of the city. He tells how Rio rose over its first few centuries, and then fell into the same morose situation that afflicted so many metropolises through the Cold War years, a conflation of the effects of over-exposure that turned an exciting, exclusive experience like early Copacobana into the banality of over-exposure, and a structuralist approach to cities that sucked them of life. Alongside the allusions to many a scandalous encounter, there are nods to the less glamorous aspects of Rio's underbelly, but the favelas, the drugs trade and Brazil's notorious crimeworld are skipped over with only the scantest of mentions.

Despite the vivid picture he draws, for all the talk of hypnotic rhythms, the book never quite grips the reader or imparts the carnival spirit on which its first half is almost entirely focussed. It may be that that detachment is telling of a divorce that has taken place between the Rio of legend and the Rio as experienced by a man who has lived through the city's awkward middle years and is still trying to work out a place in a new age, but it results in a less engaging book than one might hope this city would inspire. As a quick read, Rio is worth a look, but its not quite the mesmerising experience readers may be looking for.
Honeirsil
Rio is every carioca's mistress.

As a true lover of the city, I was amazed by Ruy Castro's profound and inspired view of Rio. He makes this book as interesting for someone just looking for a travel guide as for the most serious and passionate student of the city's soul.

Rio is more than just a beautiful accident of geography and history. This one place that, so stubbornly and yet, so rightfully calls itself "the wonderful city", like a being greater than its buildings, streets, beaches and mountains, is a major character of our lives.

This is no trivial book about Rio. Ruy Castro writes, in a good-humored and elegant style, a guide to the carioca soul: a fresh, original and colorful view of the city and the people that make it the best place to live in the world.
Ruy Castro's chronicle of Rio takes you through the city's centuries long history to where it is today: the marvelous city. Castro has great wit and humor and has knack for telling a story. Excellent quick read before visiting Rio before the Carnival.