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eBook Like Shooting Rapids in the Dark: Selected Writings on Education by Billy O. Wireman download

by Dr. Billy O. Wireman

eBook Like Shooting Rapids in the Dark: Selected Writings on Education by Billy O. Wireman download ISBN: 1588380882
Author: Dr. Billy O. Wireman
Publisher: NewSouth Books (March 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1393 kb
Fb2: 1501 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr docx txt lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

And few people know more about education than Billy O. Wireman, the recently retired president of Queens College. This book consists of selections from his writing and thinking over forty years in the field in which he has become internationally known as an educational visionary.

And few people know more about education than Billy O. Wireman communicates No issue is more central to the American experiment today than education. And few people know more about education than Billy O. Wireman, the recently retired president of Queens College

Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

Education's Own Brand of Inflation. The hall of education at the world's fair: A great disappointment.

The 60-minute documentary will provide a retrospective on the life of the late Dr. Billy O. Wireman, president of Queens University of Charlotte from 1978 - 2002, and the significant growth. See full summary . Added to Watchlist. View production, box office, & company info.

Get Billy Wireman's contact information, age, background check, white . Banking titan Hugh McColl, Jr. recalls the conversation he had with former Queens President Dr. Wireman about naming the McColl School of Business.

9 people named Billy Wireman living in the US. Billy J Wireman age: ~47. Known as: Billy S Wireman Has lived in: Gonzales, LAGeismar, LAPrairieville, L. .Billy J Wireman age: ~55. Known as: Billy Wireman. Billy Wireman Social Networks Profiles.

I send you a picture of Billy made with the Perry shutter as quick as it can . Billy posed standing in the street near old Beaver Smith’s saloon. The shot burnt the clothes on his stomach off and lifted him right back into the room. Snow on Charlie’s left boot.

I send you a picture of Billy made with the Perry shutter as quick as it can be worked-Pyro and soda developer. I am making daily experiments now and find I am able to take passing horses at a lively trot square across the line of fire-bits of snow in the air-spokes well defined-some blur on top of wheel but sharp in the main-men walking are no trick-I will send you proofs sometime. The picture makes him rough and uncouth. The expression of his face was really boyish and pleasant.

Hundreds of songs, books, motion pictures, radio and television programs, and plays have been inspired by the story of the outlaw Billy the Kid. Depictions of him in popular culture have fluctuated between a cold-blooded murderer without a heart and. Depictions of him in popular culture have fluctuated between a cold-blooded murderer without a heart and a sentimental hero fighting for justice Billy the Kid will always be interesting, will always appeal to the popular imagination"

Billy Collins (22 March 1941 -, New York City). I imagined the atmosphere would be clear, shot with pristine light, not this sulphurous haze, the air ionized as before a thunderstorm. Many have pictured a river here, but no one mentioned all the boats, their benches crowded with naked passengers, each bent over a writing tablet. think of it more as an exercise, he groans, think of writing as a process, a never-ending, infernal process, and now the boats have become jammed together, bow against stern, stern locked to bow, and not a thing is moving, only our diligent pens. Poems by Billy Collins : 52, 52.

Billy Collins wrote it in the hope that it would encourage readers and students to look, listen and react to a poem in subtle imaginative ways, rather than ride roughshod over i. There's mystery in the ordinary,' according to Collins

There's mystery in the ordinary,' according to Collins. This mystery can be experienced by the reader (and the student/poet) if they are willing to approach each poem as if it were a new day in which they're about to be entertained. In this case, by a few metaphors and intriguing imagery.

No issue is more central to the American experiment today than education. And few people know more about education than Billy O. Wireman, the recently retired president of Queens College. This book consists of selections from his writing and thinking over forty years in the field in which he has become internationally known as an educational visionary. Wireman communicates an intense sense of where American education needs to go and a keen sense of how to get there. Wireman’s book is for anyone seriously interested in what every citizen should be interested in: education and the construction of the future. Wireman writes about education not as a disembodied abstraction but from the perspective of one person who has thought about it, lived within it, and put it into practice. Modest, self-depreciating, and self-critical, Billy O. Wireman personifies passion for students, teachers, and education. Not everyone will embrace all his ideas, but we would all be poorer without them. As surely as the sun will rise, America’s democratic experiment will fail if we lose sight of what education can and must do. Anyone seriously interested in education―and that should be every American―will profit from Billy Wireman’s insights, arguments, and vision.
Comments: (4)
Knights from Bernin
There is a new form of illiteracy, says Billy O. Wireman, the illiteracy of specialization, of being unable or unwilling to see life as a whole, to see how we fit into it. In his fourth book, Like Shooting Rapids in the Dark (NewSouth Books), Wireman lays out a set of rules for educators to follow if they ever hope to slow and reverse this flash-flood of illiteracy.

The book of essays, edited by Dick Goode and Bob Whalen, appears as Billy Wireman closes out a long career in formal education, thirty-four years of serving as president of two private colleges. In 1979 he left Eckerd College � formerly Florida Presbyterian, which he�d helped save from financial ruin � to rescue Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina, from the brink of bankruptcy. He told potential donors in Charlotte, �We are not raising money, we are transforming human potential into human actuality.�
Along the way, Wireman transformed Queens as well. His successor, Pamela Lewis, takes over a school that is ranked one of the best in the Southeast by US News & World Report, a financially stable school that becomes in June Queens University of Charlotte.
Education is a search, writes Wireman. �This search is an ongoing process and must constantly be in pursuit of the unknown, the new experience, and, and must bring some reward to the person and must give the �searcher� confidence.� This confidence, he says, comes from �moving from the known to the unknown and back again.�
The major goal for higher education, he wrote in 1965, is to �free the intellect from ignorance and make it a critical but constructive instrument. This can be done by developing in each student a firm grasp of what has been and what is and by asking what ought to be.�
In essay after essay, Wireman convinces his reader that the obligation of education is something more than providing the tools of marketplace success. �Rather than the historic concept of the university as �the ancient and universal company of scholars,� we have what (Robert) Hutchins has called �a series of separate schools and departments held together by a central heating system.�� This rings as something as a caveat to Queens, where one of Pamela Lewis�s stated goals will be to get the school�s sometimes disparate departments functioning as one.
Occasionally, Billy O. Wireman�s dogged American can-do edges toward boosterism. �Around the world, ideology is dead or dying,� he writes, implying that ideology ��dogmatic fantasies of secular utopias which festered through the twentieth century� � is something that happens in other countries but not in America.
He recounts the story of being asked by Nixon counselor George Schultz in 1969, �What is a university for?� And he suggests that American colleges have expanded and grown over the past half-century, giving little thought to their purpose. Continuing on this course, he warns, schools will continue to foster illiteracy, generations �drifting through life without knowing what is taking place.�
Billy Wireman has done precious little drifting in his own life. Now, for those of us interested in the processes and purposes of education, he gives us Like Shooting Rapids in the Dark, a steady hand on the tiller.
Katishi
Let me state first that I have known Dr Wireman for over a decade and consider him a friend. But after reading this book, I have new appreciation for his talents, quiet leadership, management style, perserverance and in particular, his prescience in recognizing the consequences of globalization before many others both in and out of education.
The excellent selections of his speeches and writings in this well-edited compact volume led me to think of Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore's former prime minister. Lee was a leader who started out as a socialist lawyer but pragmatically transformed himself into a firebrand politician and then into a visionary statesman who led his small, resource-poor country to become the most "globalized" market economy in Southeast Asia. Often the question is asked -- a tribute to Lee's intellect and leadership: What if he had been in charge of a big nation like China?
Dr Wireman started out as a physical education teacher and coach and turned himself into an innovative administrator and then a visionary educator who led a small, resource-poor institution into one of the most "globalized" liberal arts universities in the US. Queens may not be as famous as the Ivy League colleges, but it is a unique institution that has prospered in large measure because Wireman, his colleagues and his coalitions of volunteers all recognized the need to "think global, act local" -- to plug into the world, while serving the needs of their constituents in Charlotte and the southern US.
I hasten to add that unlike Lee, Dr Wireman did not achieve his goals through authoritarian rule. As one can plainly see in his writings and speeches, he is a committed democrat and liberal thinker. Readers will enjoy these gems of "disarmed truth." Wireman's views on the student protests of the 1960s are particularly insightful. There is humor, too. Take a look at his advice for fellow college presidents. He offers inspiration to fundraisers everywhere and especially to educators in developing and developed countries who may be struggling in little known, cash-strapped institutions but who are doggedly determined to provide the best possible education to their students.
What could Dr Wireman have accomplished if he had been running a larger, better known institution? It is a moot question that, as with Singapore's Lee, is silly to ask. The point is that Wireman, like Lee, made his mark by steering a small, but nimble player to become world-class. That was his mission -- and that is his enduring legacy.
Naktilar
"Shooting Rapids" is a well organized, insightful and entertaining collection of writings by one of America's finest educators. Dr. Wireman has done an excellent job of chronicling the recent history of higher education based on his firsthand experience. Dr. Wireman covers it all - from the student lead war protests of the 1960's to defining, in the new millennium, the age old question, "What is a university for?"
In my opinion, one of the most valuable pieces of knowledge Dr. Wireman leaves with the reader is on page 56, "The president's relationship is not one of employer-employee but rather colleague to colleague." As someone who has had the privilege of being a recipient of Dr. Wireman's tutelage, both as a student and colleague, the insights and lessons he shares are valuable to anyone striving for a productive career and noble life.