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eBook A Separate Canaan: The Making of an Afro-Moravian World in North Carolina, 1763-1840 (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History ... and the University of North Carolina Press) download

by Jon F. Sensbach

eBook A Separate Canaan: The Making of an Afro-Moravian World in North Carolina, 1763-1840 (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History ... and the University of North Carolina Press) download ISBN: 0807846988
Author: Jon F. Sensbach
Publisher: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (March 2, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 372
ePub: 1523 kb
Fb2: 1324 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw lrf lrf docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

A Separate Canaan is one of those rare books that explores an almost totally neglected area of history. A fascinating case study dealing with the Afro-Moravian experience in North Carolina from 1763 to 1840.

A Separate Canaan is one of those rare books that explores an almost totally neglected area of history. Jon Sensbach's exhaustive study of Moravian church records uncovers in absorbing detail the exceptional, if short-lived, efforts of German Moravian settlers to establish in North Carolina a unique model of interracial fellowship built on the Christian ideal of the spiritual equality of all believers. Jon Sensbach has produced an intriguing study concerning the Afro-Moravian experience in North Carolina.

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998. Sensbach brings to life a largely ignored presence in early American history: the Africans and their descendants who made a life in the German Moravian settlements in the western Piedmont of North Carolina. Placing the Moravian settlements of Bethabara, Wachovia, Salem, and Hope firmly within the context of the Atlantic world, Sensbach travels to Africa, Germany, and the Caribbean to track both the movement of peoples and of radical Protestantism

A Separate Canaan book. Published March 2nd 1998 by Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (first published March 1998).

A Separate Canaan book. A Separate Canaan: The Making of an Afro-Moravian World in North Carolina, 1763-1840. 0807823945 (ISBN13: 9780807823941).

University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture . Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track of progress.

University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia. Here's an example of what they look like: Your reading intentions are also stored in your profile for future reference. How do I set a reading intention.

Paperback Book, 368 pages. The power of race to overwhelm other ideals is conveyed in this history of . s Moravian colonists and their slaves.

The University of Chicago Press. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Chicago Distribution Center. The Journal of Religion. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin. Some Characteristics of Hinduism as a Religion. The Ethical Theory of Saint Thomas Aquinas: Interpretations and Misinterpretations.

Journal of American Studies. University of Warwick. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 05 June 2002.

Professor Jon Sensbach received his P. in 1991 in early American history from Duke University, his . in 1980 from the University of Virginia. He joined the University of Florida Department of History in 1998 after teaching at the College of William and Mary and the University of Southern Mississippi. He teaches the Department’s foundation graduate course on early America and has recently taught a graduate seminar on the Black Atlantic as well as undergraduate courses on the Atlantic slave trade, colonial America, and the American Revolution.

Journal of Interdisciplinary History (2000). Find in your library. Citation Information. com/dylan penningroth/15/.

Publisher:University of North Carolina Press.

In colonial North Carolina, German-speaking settlers from the Moravian Church founded a religious refuge-an ideal society, they hoped, whose blueprint for daily life was the Bible and whose Chief Elder was Christ himself. Publisher:University of North Carolina Press.

In colonial North Carolina, German-speaking settlers from the Moravian Church founded a religious refuge--an ideal society, they hoped, whose blueprint for daily life was the Bible and whose Chief Elder was Christ himself. As the community's demand for labor grew, the Moravian Brethren bought slaves to help operate their farms, shops, and industries. Moravians believed in the universalism of the gospel and baptized dozens of African Americans, who became full members of tightly knit Moravian congregations. For decades, white and black Brethren worked and worshiped together--though white Moravians never abandoned their belief that black slavery was ordained by God. Based on German church documents, including dozens of rare biographies of black Moravians, A Separate Canaan is the first full-length study of contact between people of German and African descent in early America. Exploring the fluidity of race in Revolutionary era America, it highlights the struggle of African Americans to secure their fragile place in a culture unwilling to give them full human rights. In the early nineteenth century, white Moravians forsook their spiritual inclusiveness, installing blacks in a separate church. Just as white Americans throughout the new republic rejected African American equality, the Moravian story illustrates the power of slavery and race to overwhelm other ideals.
Comments: (2)
Rishason
Splendid book - well-researched. A must-read for a Moravian. I learned so much!
Enila
John F. Sensbach has written an engaging and erudite synthesis of Moravian attitudes toward slavery. The writing style hides Sensbach's grip on the complexities of the literature concerning slavery and racism in the early United States. His use the words and lives of individual Moravian slaves brings to light the voices of those who normally would have been voiceless during the colonial and revolutionary periods. His analysis is not one-sided; he brings to light all the facets of Moravian cultural life and how those religious and social institutions impacted the Moravian debate on the institution of slavery. The Moravians may then be likely viewed as a model for understanding the ambiguity of attitudes toward slaves during the colonial period and early Republic. Sensbach's writing is beautiful and easily conveys a masterful understanding of the period. This is the sort of book that a historian reads not only for information, but for enjoyment as well.