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by E. A. Brininstool,J. W. Vaughn

eBook Troopers with Custer (The Custer Library) download ISBN: 0811717429
Author: E. A. Brininstool,J. W. Vaughn
Publisher: Stackpole Books; 2 edition (March 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 2
ePub: 1223 kb
Fb2: 1625 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit docx mbr txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Read "Troopers with Custer Historic Incidents of the Battle of the Little Big Horn" by E. A. Brininstool . Every character mentioned in each chapter was a living, breathing person, and every incident related in this book can be vouched for and verified. From Troopers with Custer.

Every character mentioned in each chapter was a living, breathing person, and every incident related in this book can be vouched for and verified. Although everyone in Custer’s immediate command was killed during the fighting at the Battle of Little Big Horn on June 25-26, 1876, others who participated in the battle survived.

From Troopers with Custer E. Brininstool, J. W. Vaughn.

From Troopers with Custer. Troopers with Custer tells their stories, often in their own words. E.

Some of the veterans who corresponded with E. Brininstool were still alive when his book first appeared in a shortened . More incisively than many later writers, Brininstool considers the causes of Custer’s defeat and questions the alleged cowardice of Major Marcus A. Reno. Brininstool were still alive when his book first appeared in a shortened version in 1925. It has long been recognized as classic Custeriana.

No one survived in Custer’s immediate command, but other soldiers fighting in the Battle of the Little Big Horn on June . Their true and terrible stories are included in Troopers with Custer.

No one survived in Custer’s immediate command, but other soldiers fighting in the Battle of the Little Big Horn on June 25-26, 1876, were doomed to remember the nightmarish scene for decades after. Some of the veterans who corresponded with E. It has long been recognized as classic Custeriana

by. Brininstool, E. (Earl Alonzo), 1870-1957.

movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. by. Custer, George A. (George Armstrong), 1839-1876, Little Bighorn, Battle of the, Mont. Mechanicsburg, PA : Stackpole Books. inlibrary; printdisabled;.

Troopers with Custer book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Custer Victorious: The Civil War Battles of General George Armstrong Custer. Whitman, S. The Troopers: An Informal History of the Plains Cavalry.

Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1975. Stands in Timber, John. Custer Victorious: The Civil War Battles of General George Armstrong Custer. London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1983. Utley, Robert M. Cavalier in Buckskin: George Armstrong Custer and the Western Military Frontier. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1988. --. Custer and the Great Controversy: The Origin and Development of a Legend. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1998. New York: Hastings House, 1962. Whittaker, Frederick.

Troopers with Custer: Historic Incidents of the Battle of the Little Big Horn, By E. Vaughn, Published by Stackpole Books, 1994, ISBN 0-8117-1742-9

Troopers with Custer: Historic Incidents of the Battle of the Little Big Horn, By E. Vaughn, Published by Stackpole Books, 1994, ISBN 0-8117-1742-9, ISBN 978-0-8117-1742-7, p. 93–218. "Frederick William Sibley". Finerty, John F. War-Path and Bivouac 1890. More incisively than many later writers, Brininstool considers the causes of Custer's defeat and questions the alleged cowardice of Major Marcus A.

Troopers with Custer Historic Incidents of the Battle of the Little Big Horn by E. Brininstool 9780803261013 (Paperback, 1989) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 7 to 9 working days. See all. About this item.

No one survived in Custer's immediate command, but other soldiers fighting in the Battle of the Little Big Horn on June 25-26, 1876, were doomed to remember the nightmarish scene for decades after. Their true and terrible stories are included in Troopers with Custer. Some of the veterans who corresponded with E. A. Brininstool were still alive when his book first appeared in a shortened version in 1925. It has long been recognized as classic Custeriana.

More incisively than many later writers, Brininstool considers the causes of Custer's defeat and questions the alleged cowardice of Major Marcus A. Reno. His exciting reenactment of the Battle of the Little Big Horn sets up the reader for a series of turns by its stars and supporting and bit players. Besides the boy general with the golden locks, they include Captain Frederick W. Benteen, the scouts Lieutenant Charles A. Varnum and "Lonesome Charley" Reynolds, the trumpeter John Martin, officers and troopers in the ranks who miraculously escaped death, the only surviving surgeon and the captain of the steamboat that carried the wounded away, the newspaperman who spread the news to the world, and many others.

Comments: (3)
Centrizius
This is a very readable book with interviews and stories by many of the participants of the 76 campaign. As Brian Pohanka (foreword) adeptly informs the reader, Brninstool did tremendous research and interviewed and corresponded with a number of the survivors of the LBH. However, as Pohanka hits the nail on the head, Brininstool lacks objectivity when it comes to Reno and Benteen. He supports their versions 100%. In Benteen's statements, he repeatedly denies that Custer had any plan. And in his testimony and letters he constantly states that he was to just ride to infinity to the left, which is totally absurd. In Gray's time motion studies and in Darlings "Benteen's Scout to the Left", Benteen only went one mile further than Custer by the time their trails intersect. Brininstool constant reminds the reader that Custer through his adjutant stated that Reno "would be supported by the whole regiment". If that statement was true then obviously he meant for Benteen to join the attack. If you tour the site of the first separation, it made logical sense for Custer to have flankers on the left where the ground rose and could have hid attacking Indians on his flank. In addition, Brininstool supports Reno and his "charge" that was actually a rout. Later in the excellent recounting of the Lt. Kidder massacre in 1867 about the young Lieutenant and his platoon that ran into a Sioux war party the author states "Running away from Indians was, in the opinion of experienced Indian fighters, poor policy." Well, he seems to forget this when applauding Reno for his abrupt run from the cottonwoods leaving 21 men behind who didn't get the word and somehow survived but Reno still lost 1/3 of his command in his run. The survivors particularly Lt. Hare continuously state that they would have not lived other wise. Brininstool also over estimates the number of Indians. Brininstool also has a section on Theodore Goldin and the famous water detail, which is very interesting except that Goldin has historically been proven to fabricate the truth including his own service period.
The best parts of the book are the story of Lt. DeRudio and Sgt. O'Neil's exciting two
days surrounded by Indians while abandoned and hiding in the cottonwoods after Reno suddenly bugged, the retelling of the 1867 Lt. Kidder massacre and the exciting story of Lt. Sibley's escape from a large Sioux war party while scouting for Crook. After being surrounded, Sibley led by famous scouts Grouard and Baptise Pourier abandon their horses at night and travel days in broken country to return to Crooks base camp. The book also includes a mini-bio on Lonesome Charlie Reynolds, one of the greatest scouts of the west who died turning Reno's bug out. Although not mentioned by the author, another great Scout Herendeen testified that he and Reynolds discussed that the worst thing that one could do is try to outrun Indians which was supposedly said not long before Reno abruptly hauled freight.
Lots of great testimony in spite of Benteen's self serving interview which is valuable to read since his extreme defensiveness is obvious along with his distaste for Custer, his argument is so absurd that it is irrational to believe. Besides Brininstool's lack of objectivity, I was disappointed that he didn't have more interviews with the surviving
Troopers such as Peter Thompson who was with Custer until just before Medicine Trail Coulee where his horse broke down with a few other troopers who walked back to join Reno. Those interviews with these only technical survivors would have been fascinating.
This is actually a good book to add to your collection. In contrast, I like Walter Camp's book "Custer in 76" edited by Ken Hammer better. It appears more objective with lots of nuggets of information such as references to Peter Thompson. Brininstool like Camp met a lot of the participants, reading both is a pleasure.
greatest
This is a book written in the early 20th century and features interviews with some of the troopers and other folks associated with the 7th Cavalry and Custer. It is a lovely book. Well written and insightful. The language and point-of-view on Indians is, of course, dated. But it was a real treat for me to read as I think I got a real flavor for the time and events leading up to the Custer massacre. Very much worth your time and money.
anonymous
A good addition to my Custer library.