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by Richard E. Bennett

eBook Mormons at the Missouri, Winter Quarters, 1846-1852 download ISBN: 0806136154
Author: Richard E. Bennett
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (June 30, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1163 kb
Fb2: 1308 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc azw lit lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Richard E. Bennett is Professor of Church History in the School of Religious Education . He is the author of numerous articles on Latter-day Saint pioneer history and of Mormons at the Missouri: Winter Quarters, 1846–1852.

Richard E. Bennett is Professor of Church History in the School of Religious Education, Brigham Young University. Paperback: 360 pages. Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (June 30, 2004).

Richard Edmond Bennett. The Mormon trek westward from Illinois to the Salt Lake Valley was an enduring accomplishment of American overland trail migration; however, their wintering at the Missouri River near present-day Omaha was a feat of faith and perseverance

Richard Edmond Bennett. The Mormon trek westward from Illinois to the Salt Lake Valley was an enduring accomplishment of American overland trail migration; however, their wintering at the Missouri River near present-day Omaha was a feat of faith and perseverance. Richard E. Bennett presents new facts and ideas that challenge old arly that life on the frontier encouraged American individualism. Bennett presents new facts and ideas that challenge old assumptions . I agree with Bennett that the 2-3 years spent at Winter Quarters is largely ignored these days by LDS Church members. Bennett presents new facts and ideas that challenge old assumptions—particularly that life on the frontier encouraged American individualism.

Written by Richard E Bennett, Audiobook narrated by Alan J. Gardner. the tremendous suffering that took place at Winter Quarters as people waited for their trip to the West. A prime demonstration that detached and objective scholarship can still produce books that are emotionally compelling. Patricia Nelson Limerick, author of The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West).

In Mormons at the Missouri, Richard Bennett examines in detail a crucial and often neglected period in the evolution of Mormon institutions and ideas

In Mormons at the Missouri, Richard Bennett examines in detail a crucial and often neglected period in the evolution of Mormon institutions and ideas. Bennett describes his study as the story of a religious people in an American wilderness

MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI WINTER QUARTERS, 1846-1 852 By Richard . Mormons at the. Missouri, 1846- 1852. New advances were being made in science, industry, and agriculture.

MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI WINTER QUARTERS, 1846-1 852 By Richard E. Bennett. University of Oklahoma Press : Norman. Specific to the present book, the history of Winter Quarters, the interim headquarters of the Mormons from 1846 to 1848 while they were in transit from Illinois to the mountains, has been sadly neglected.

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The Mormon trek westward from Illinois to the Salt Lake Valley was an enduring accomplishment of American overland trail migration; however, their wintering at th. .Mormons at the Missouri, Winter Quarters, 1846-1852. by Richard E.

Richard Edmond Bennett (born 1946) is a professor of Church History and Doctrine at Brigham Young University (BYU)

Richard Edmond Bennett (born 1946) is a professor of Church History and Doctrine at Brigham Young University (BYU). Prior to joining the faculty of BYU Bennett was the head of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the University of Manitoba from 1978 to 1997. Bennett has served as president of the Mormon History Association. Bennett is a native of Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

The Mormon trek westward from Illinois to the Salt Lake Valley was an enduring accomplishment of American overland trail migration; however, their wintering at the Missouri River near present-day Omaha was a feat of faith and perseverance. Richard E. Bennett presents new facts and ideas that challenge old assumptions―particularly that life on the frontier encouraged American individualism.

With an excellent command of primary sources, Bennett assesses the role of women in a pioneer society and the Mormon strategies for survival in a harsh environment as they planned their emigration, coped with internal dissension and Indian agents, and dealt with tribes of the region. This was, says Bennett, “Mormonism in the raw on the way to what it would be later.” Now available in paperback for the first time, with a new introduction by the author, Mormons at the Missouri received the Francis M. and Emily Chipman Award from the Mormon History Association and was honored as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association.

Comments: (5)
great ant
Those of us who are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons) cherish our doctrine and our history. Most of us know a great deal about the life of Joseph Smith, the history of the church in New York, Kirtland Ohio, Missouri, and Nauvoo Illinois. We then know there was a difficult period of pioneering where the Church trekked from Nauvoo to Winter Quarters, which we vaguely know was quite awful, and then they get over the Rockies and founded Salt Lake City and colonize what later becomes Utah, Idaho, Nevada, and Arizona. But the actual details of why, how, and when we left Nauvoo, why we were at Winter Quarters, and what we did there are all quite vague for most of us.

I was watching a show called "The History of the Saints" on BYU-TV and saw a few episodes on this period between the martyrdom of Joseph Smith in 1844 until the arrival in the Great Basin in 1847, and one of the scholars I really enjoyed was Richard E. Bennett. I looked up his books and bought this book and its sequel , "We'll Find the Place". While I am still reading the second book, reading this book was a revelation. While I am delighted to know so much more about leaving Nauvoo and why the Saints ended up having to hunker down out on both sides of the Missouri River until they could finally head for the Valley in the spring of 1847, it was an education of a very sad period in our history. More than a thousand men, women, and children died there because of disease, exposure, and exhaustion. This was about one in twelve of the people who had left Nauvoo. But it could have been far worse.

Bennett shows us how resourceful they were in building what amounted to the first city in what became Nebraska, and how the Saints were scattered all over Iowa and lived in small camps and communities. They were creative in doing work to create goods they could trade for food and supplies and in hiring out their labor to farms in the region and even sending five hundred of their best and strongest men off in the Mormon Battalion on a long march to help secure the Southwest for the United States. The enlistment provided needed hard money the Saints could use to buy necessities for all and care for the families of the soldiers. They even build a grist mill that still stands today that was kept busy around the clock making flour to feed the thousands who faced starvation without the bread made from that flour.

Bennett provides us with rich detail on the politics of the Saints being in Indian territory and the concerns the U.S. had about keeping the Mormons from aligning with the British over Oregon or the Mexicans in the Southwest. How Brigham Young managed these negotiations to get what he had to have to get permission (sort of) to create Winter Quarters on the WEST side of the Missouri so they would not have to cross so many people and thousands of head of cattle in the spring flood.

This book shows the Saints as real people and does not sugar coat them in any way. He is open and frank about the need for police in Winter Quarters, about those who left the Church, about the threat posed by challengers to Brigham Young such as James Strang who convinced more than 2,000 members to follow him instead of Young. Bennett is also quite clear that Brigham was not at all frank about where he was leading the Saints to and may not have settled on the final destination for some time. But he certainly got lots of advice from challengers and managed their threats while staying on his own course. The material on how Brigham managed the re-organization of the First Presidency and the log tabernacle is fascinating.

For me, the most inspiring aspects of this often heartbreaking story is the way they strove to work together as a community and to make this difficult exodus together or not at all. This was no haphazard operation. They companies were as organized as the people themselves would follow. Still, many suffered tremendously despite their faith, loyalty, prayers, and earnest devotion. The Lord does try and test His people. And these Saints, to my mind, passed the test.

This book briefly notes the 90 day trek from Winter Quarters to Salt Lake, but does not really discuss it in detail. The focus of this book is the journey from Nauvoo to the creation and use of Winter Quarters and the camps on the east of the Missouri River, as well. The sequel, which I am reading now and will review soon, deals with the journey to Salt Lake in more detail. Both are full of wonderful illustrations and reproductions of art (made later) of the events. Some are contemporary sketches from journals.

For anyone who wants to know real Mormon History, I think this book is an essential and marvelous resource. I have it on a privileged spot on my bookshelf. I hope you get a copy and put it in your own library.

Reviewed by Craig Matteson, Saline, MI
Gavigamand
Excellent review of events
Kulasius
Lots of great information, some put downs of church leaders too.
Cogelv
This is a fine work. Probably the best available overview of the period.
monotronik
Excellent scholarly, well-researched book that is worth a very careful reading to understand the Mormon experience at Winter Quarters. The footnotes are a vital part of the book. Highly recommended.