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eBook Lincoln and His Admirals download

by Craig Symonds

eBook Lincoln and His Admirals download ISBN: 0199751579
Author: Craig Symonds
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (October 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1187 kb
Fb2: 1368 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit mobi lrf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

His book Lincoln and His Admirals received the Lincoln Prize. The son of Lee and Virginia Symonds, Craig Symonds attended Anaheim High School then University of California, Los Angeles, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967

His book Lincoln and His Admirals received the Lincoln Prize Contents. 1 Early life and education. The son of Lee and Virginia Symonds, Craig Symonds attended Anaheim High School then University of California, Los Angeles, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967. Going on to graduate work, he obtained his . in history at the University of Florida in 1969 with a thesis on "The defense of the southwestern frontier, 1784-1794: a study in governmental relations.

Lincoln and His Admirals is simply superb and Craig Symonds' analysis of US Navy leadership during the Civil War is magnificent! The Lincoln-esque gems placed throughout the book made reading it a delight. The chapters on the Fort Sumter crisis and the Trent affair are incisive and the best discussions of these dramas I have ever read.

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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Abraham Lincoln began his presidency admitting that he knew "e;but little of ships,"e; but he quickly came to preside over the largest national armada to that time, not eclipsed until World War I. Writt. Written by naval historian Craig L. Symonds, Lincoln and His Admirals unveils an aspect of Lincoln's presidency unexamined by historians until now, revealing how he managed the men who ran the naval side of the Civil War, and how the activities of the Union Navy ultimately affected the course of history

Lincoln and His Admirals book.

Lincoln and His Admirals book.

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Lincoln and His Admirals. 2 5 Author: Craig L. Symonds Narrator: David de Vries. Download books offline, listen to several books continuously, choose stories for your kids, or try out a book that you didn't thought you would like to listen to. The best book experience you'd ever had.

In Lincoln and His Admirals, however, Craig L. Symonds argues that the Union navy’s contribution to the war . Although Symonds was already a well-respected historian, Lincoln and His Admirals is likely to be his definitive and most influential work. Symonds argues that the Union navy’s contribution to the war was important, multidimensional, and illustrative of the conflict’s larger social, political, and economic issues. Indeed, it won several awards, including the prestigious Lincoln Prize in 2009.

But Symonds also shows that Lincoln could act decisively. This is a book about the emergence and growth of Abraham Lincoln as a wartime commander in chief. Disappointed by the lethargy of his senior naval officers on the scene, he stepped in and personally directed an amphibious assault on the Virginia coast, a successful operation that led to the capture of Norfolk. To illustrate that evolution, it focuses on Lincoln’s relationship with, and management of, the United States Navy.

Craig L. Symonds is Professor Emeritus at the . Naval Academy and the author of ten previous books, including Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles that Shaped American History, which won the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Prize in 2006.

Abraham Lincoln began his presidency admitting that he knew "but little of ships," but he quickly came to preside over the largest national armada to that time, not eclipsed until World War I. Written by naval historian Craig L. Symonds, Lincoln and His Admirals unveils an aspect of Lincoln's presidency unexamined by historians until now, revealing how he managed the men who ran the naval side of the Civil War, and how the activities of the Union Navy ultimately affected the course of history. Beginning with a gripping account of the attempt to re-supply Fort Sumter--a comedy of errors that shows all too clearly the fledgling president's inexperience--Symonds traces Lincoln's steady growth as a wartime commander-in-chief. Absent a Secretary of Defense, he would eventually become de facto commander of joint operations along the coast and on the rivers. That involved dealing with the men who ran the Navy: the loyal but often cranky Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, the quiet and reliable David G. Farragut, the flamboyant and unpredictable Charles Wilkes, the ambitious ordnance expert John Dahlgren, the well-connected Samuel Phillips Lee, and the self-promoting and gregarious David Dixon Porter. Lincoln was remarkably patient; he often postponed critical decisions until the momentum of events made the consequences of those decisions evident. But Symonds also shows that Lincoln could act decisively. Disappointed by the lethargy of his senior naval officers on the scene, he stepped in and personally directed an amphibious assault on the Virginia coast, a successful operation that led to the capture of Norfolk. The man who knew "but little of ships" had transformed himself into one of the greatest naval strategists of his age. Co-winner of the 2009 Lincoln PrizeWinner of the 2009 Barondess/Lincoln Prize by the Civil War Round Table of New YorkJohn Lyman Award of the North American Society for Oceanic HistoryDaniel and Marilyn Laney Prize by the Austin Civil War Round TableNevins-Freeman Prize of the Civil War Round Table of Chicago
Comments: (7)
Yllk
An excellent review of Lincoln's admirals, and his relationship with them, as well as including the relationships other people in Lincoln's govt. with these admirals. Really informative. Much info. I hadn't read before. (I'm an avid C.W. fan) So, you are not wasting your money.

Only one complaint, and I don't know if it's really legitimate judging on this author's great presentation. I did feel like I wanted to know more of the personal lives of these admirals, and not just relationship with Lincoln. I must say the author does get into some of their personal loves quite well. I was looking for more.
Shadowredeemer
In the deluge of new books about the sixteenth president appearing in anticipation of the bicentennial of his birth, Lincoln and His Admirals stands apart. It begins to fill the void resulting from the frequent neglect of the naval aspects of the Civil War. For this reason alone, the book is worthwhile.

The book, however, is more than merely worthwhile. It is a comprehensive account of the events and personalities involved in this crucial phase of the Civil War that is told in a fine narrative style. Symonds provides a compelling story of how Lincoln's initial reluctance to command was replaced by an increasing confidence that led to his personal role in many great and small details of naval administration. This "sea change" was the product of Lincoln's perceptive intelligence and his relentless determination to preserve the Union.

Symonds includes informative portraits of many naval officers now almost lost to history and judiciously tallies their strengths and weakness. It did seem odd to me that he has comparatively little to say about Farragut or his torpedo-damning ascent of Mobile Bay. I was also surprised by the omission of the duel between Alabama and Kearsarge -- only the outcome is reported. Perhaps the author concluded that these events are already well-known. My only other criticism is that the first portion of the book would have been improved by relating the less familiar events afloat to those ashore that are much more widely known. At one point, I thought a timeline would have been helpful, but later, the author links the war at sea with the land war very well.

Finally, I have to say that this very good book has a very good dust jacket. In the foreground is a vivid image of the encounter between Monitor and Merrimack (or Virginia), but looming above it is the ghostly face of Abraham Lincoln. It is a perceptive introduction to this highly recommended book.
Alsanadar
I attended a lecture presented by the author on the story of the Monitor and Virginia (I prefer Merrimac). Mr. Symonds is all Navy; he taught at the US Naval Academy. He knows his material thoroughly. He is witty and engaging. Those qualities prompted me to buy this book. It exceded my expectations.

The book is much more than a discourse on Lincoln and his admirals. It is a concise and precise compilation on the US Navy during the Civil War. It gives much attention to Lincoln's crucial interactions with the Secretary of the Navy and his assistant as well as the admirals and officers of the USN. The narrative also provides in-depth attention to other participants such as engineers and US Army generals. And, all of this information is supported with excellent descriptions of the tactics and equipment used during the conflict. Mr. Symonds' explanations of the invention and use of ironclads is especially interesting.

The writing style and organization of the book is decidedly on the same level as works by other major authors such as Goodwin's Team of Rivals. The quality of the research and the synthesis of complex issues make this book a must-have for anyone interested in Linclon and just about any aspect of the Civil War. In addition, it offers a wealth of new perspectives on the transition of African Americans from slavery to freedom--thanks in substantial part to the efforts of the US Navy.
Andronrad
An interesting yet little known facet of the Civil War. Symonds tells the story in a narrative form keeping it interesting for the reader. Too often this type of book is very dry. It clearly illustrates the issues of government and politics in the time period have changed very little today. Mismanagement, intra service rivalry and political intrigue are just some of the issues Lincoln had to deal with, Sound Familiar?
The book increased my appreciation of Lincoln and reinforces the fact the he was one of our greatest presidents. He realized that the war at sea was an important part of overall strategy and struggled with his generals, the congress and some of his cabinet to realize this.
I strongly recommend the book to anyone with an interest in history, the Civil War and of course, Lincoln.
Miromice
Author’s books always flow along without getting caught up in minor details and minutiae. Two minor complaints. Maps hard to read or zoom when reading on Kindle. Also, a lot of emphasis on the politics of emancipation and future of slaves when freed, which is a topic for another book, not related to naval discussion. Some illustrations of various vessels described in text would be valuable.
Zulkishicage
This book provides a view of Abraham Lincoln's presidential leadership skills from the standpoint of Civil War naval affairs. It is not a history of the ships or average sailors of the period.

Professor Symonds relates how President Lincoln grew as a military leader during the war while handling the diverse crew of naval leaders that had stayed with the Union when the South first bolted. The Cabinet infighting between Welles, Seward, Chase etc. is nicely drawn, as are descriptions of foreign relations frictions brought about by actions at sea.

I liked that the author peppered his narrative with President Lincoln's small stories, often used by that great man to make serious points.