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eBook Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Three Tenant Families download

by John Hersey,James Agee

eBook Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Three Tenant Families download ISBN: 0395488974
Author: John Hersey,James Agee
Publisher: Mariner Books; First Thus edition (February 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 471
ePub: 1463 kb
Fb2: 1263 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr lrf mobi txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Americas

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is a book with text by American writer James Agee and photographs by American photographer Walker Evans, first published in 1941 in the United States.

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is a book with text by American writer James Agee and photographs by American photographer Walker Evans, first published in 1941 in the United States. The work documents the lives of impoverished tenant farmers during the Great Depression. Although it is in keeping with Evans' work with the Farm Security Administration, the project was initiated not by the FSA, but by Fortune magazine

Let us now praise James Agee, dead at 45. One can only assume that his heart swelled past bursting and exploded over his beloved Alabamian nightscapes as a starburst so marvelous as to be oft mistaken for Venus t. .

Let us now praise James Agee, dead at 45. One can only assume that his heart swelled past bursting and exploded over his beloved Alabamian nightscapes as a starburst so marvelous as to be oft mistaken for Venus to this da.This is the third time that I've attempted this book and I do not lay books down easily. The best way I can describe it is to say that it is like reading the teenage poetry of William Faulkner. Agee tries so hard to get to The Truth that he ends up with a lot of contextual melodrama.

Agee, James, 1909-1955, Farm tenancy, Social Conditions. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Houghton Mifflin Company Trade Book Archival Collection. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. inlibrary; printdisabled; bplhoughton; bostonpubliclibrary; americana. Boston Public Library. Uploaded by ruth-worboys on June 28, 2017. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Published nearly sixty years ago, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men stands as an undisputed American masterpiece .

Published nearly sixty years ago, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men stands as an undisputed American masterpiece, taking its place alongside works by Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman.

and this is still a timeless story, there are STILL too many families living on the edge their entire lives.

Physically Agee was quite powerful, in the deceptive way of uninsistent large me. Other author's books: Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Menu.

Physically Agee was quite powerful, in the deceptive way of uninsistent large men. In movement he was rather graceless. Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on the spot at night. Later, in a small house in Frenchtown, New Jersey, the work, I think, was largely night-written. Literally the result shows this; some of the sections read best at night, far in the night The first passage of A Country Letter is particularly night-permeated.

Personal Name: Agee, James, 1909-1955. Publication, Distribution, et. Boston Originally published: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1941. Boston. Houghton Mifflin, (c)1988, c1969. Physical Description: liv, 471 . p. of plates : ill. ;, 22 cm. General Note: Originally published: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1941. Geographic Name: Alabama Rural conditions. Geographic Name: Alabama Description and travel. Personal Name: Evans, Walker, 1903-1975.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on the spot at night

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Physically Agee was quite powerful, in the deceptive way of uninsistent large men.

Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on.

Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on the spot at night. With the most nearly representative of the three we lived a little less than four weeks, seeing them and the others intimately and constantly. At the end of August, long before we were willing to, we returned into the north and got our work ready. For reasons which will not be a part of this volume the article was not published. The title of this volume is Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. The tide of the work as a whole, this volume included, is Three Tenant Families.

Agee's colleague at Time in the 1940s, John Hersey, writes a major evaluation of Agee's work and the Agee legend in a new introduction to this literary classic. 64 pages of photos.
Comments: (7)
Kadar
This is an astounding chronicle, in equally evocative words and photographs, of life in the rural South amid the Great Depression. I purchased this as research for a stage production of To Kill a Mockingbird, which takes place in that time period in fictional Maycomb County, AL. I had never read the book before, although I was familiar with some of Walker Evans' photographs. I am completely blown away.
Naril
This work is touted by some as "one of the twentieth century's greatest pieces of literature." I wouldn't go that far, but the photos are incredible and I have to say the reader is placed right inside the tenant farmer's (Alabama) house and in the fields he tends. The time is the mid-1930s, in the depths of the Great Depression. Tenant farmers down South are struggling with deepening debt, chronic illnesses in their families (NO health care), land that is not arrable, and the hopeless, grinding poverty much of America suffered through in that era. The author, at times, sounds like he is attempting to imitate William Faulkner. The writing in places is highly complex, stream of consciousness stuff in some places. I like the book a lot but the reader must be very patient and willing to read methodically. It's not a breezy kind of style. It will also break your heart. The tenant farmer certainly had a rough go of it. Makes you wonder how much of this country is still in such dire straits.
Runehammer
Wow is this book a roller coaster ride. For me It went from deeply affecting and beautifully poetic to tedious and annoying. For a while I honestly thought this might be the best book I ever read. Then the pace slows . . . or stops even . . . as if you're spacing out along with the author and fixating on a floorboard or cheap picture on the wall. And then it seems like the author hands over the wheel to the photographer, who writes whatever pops into his head for pages upon pages. Or maybe its the same dude writing, in an altered state of mind, I'm not sure.

Anyway, to me this book is brave and profound. The brave part is the author's refusal to cash in on this experience by writing what he thinks we (or his bosses) want to hear. But then again he pretty much betrays his trusting hosts by snooping through their stuff and writing real personal stuff surely without their permission. The profoundness to me is the effective relaying of dignity amid the tragedy of a truly trapped situation.

If you have ever over-romanticized the south of old, or poor farm life, this book should cure you for good. It's not all perfect, but parts of it are. I would say its definitely worth the trip . . . just be ready for some detours.
White gold
It's hard to explain the power of this book. It's a cultural snapshot, but it's also a personal accounting of the coming-together of two cultures, one sophisticated, the other less so. It is the "less so" that is compelling. Highly recommend.
Abywis
Book is excellent but very deep. I found myself re-reading from time to time.
Reader be prepared for the author's projection of how he views the world and at times not so much about the subjects in his observations.
I think his advantage is being a New Yorker allowing him to see a world that is so foreign to him. Whereas a Southerner as myself would view more as not being odd or abnormal.
Coiriel
I was assigned to read this book in college. Historically, I've loathed anything I've ever been REQUIRED to read; I prefer to come to the decision as to whether or not I am going to read something on my own. However, I was very much hooked on this book within the first thirty pages or so. Now, having read it twice, it is easily in my top 5 favorite books ever.

While the book explores the day to day lives of some of the poorest to come out of extreme rural Alabama, the presentation is rather depth of content is what keeps me reading. Agee's words manage to mix more perception and mental connection than a journalistic account of what he and Walker experience. If you pace your reading and reference the photos as they are featured in the text (because they are grouped together in the middle, or at least they were in the edition I have), then it provides insight into Agee's level of perception...almost like when you ask someone if you can borrow their prescription glasses.

I can't recommend this enough. I can't assure you will enjoy it, because it is a lot more than what it looks and reads like at first...but it is certainly in no way a waste of your time and money to experience.
Moonworm
Photos by Walker Evans and text by James Agee...how could this not be excellent! Incredibly moving. Let us honor those merely trying to survive and feed their families .... for them, a meal is the ultimate trial. Agee and Walker's work centered around the working, and literally dirt poor in America, which should be a bounty of opportunity, some 70 years ago....and this is still a timeless story, there are STILL too many families living on the edge their entire lives. I hope this remarkable work never goes out of print, it's difficult to find now, thank goodness for Amazon.
One of the three books that have deeply influenced my life. From Agee's passionate prose and Evans's clear-eyed photographs, one can arrive at a deep understanding of what it means to be human, if understanding is a possibility.