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eBook African Knights: The Armies of Sokoto, Bornu and Bagirmi in the 19th Century download

by Conrad Cairns

eBook African Knights: The Armies of Sokoto, Bornu and Bagirmi in the 19th Century download ISBN: 1901543080
Author: Conrad Cairns
Publisher: Foundry (December 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 64
ePub: 1156 kb
Fb2: 1342 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi lit lrf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Africa

In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was . For those interested in Colonial warfare, there is something appealing about armies of heavy cavalary in quilted armor tooling around the African Savannah

In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was one of the most neglected parts of the African continent. For those interested in Colonial warfare, there is something appealing about armies of heavy cavalary in quilted armor tooling around the African Savannah. This is just the sort obscure topic a well meaning enthusiast can bite his teeth into. The African Knights" has all the virtues and weaknesses of an enthusiast's project. The book is well illustrated and the writing is earnest and workman like. Unfortunately, Conrad Cairns does not have the story teller's gift.

The African Knights book. Start by marking The African Knights: The Armies of Sokotu, Bornu & Bagirmi in the Nineteenth Century as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Knights : The Armies of Sokotu, Bornu and Bagirmi in the Nineteenth Century.

The African Knights : The Armies of Sokotu, Bornu and Bagirmi in the Nineteenth Century. In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was one of the most neglected parts of the African continent, and yet at the same time one of the most culturally sophisticated.

The African Knights: The Armies of Sokoto, Bornu, and Bagirmi in the 19th cent. i was reading this excellent book on portugal's colonial legacy in angola esp on its so-called egalitarian form of racial assimilation called Lusotropicalism

The African Knights: The Armies of Sokoto, Bornu, and Bagirmi in the 19th cent. i was reading this excellent book on portugal's colonial legacy in angola esp on its so-called egalitarian form of racial assimilation called Lusotropicalism. alot of it had to do with the gender ratio between the (white) male colonists and (white) female settlers, basically, more (white) female settlers eliminated the need for the (white) male colonists to partner with the (non-white) female natives, reducing the mestizo popn and imposing more segregative laws on both the latter and the former.

The African Knights: The Armies of Sokoto, Bornu and Bagirmi in the Nineteenth Century. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, a large-scale jihad was launched by the Muslim intellectual ‘Uthmān bn Fūdī (d. 1817) in Hausaland, present-day northern Nigeria. The British Occupation of the Sokoto Caliphate: The Military Dimension, 1897–1906. This jihad swiftly overwhelmed the Hausa kingdoms from 1804 to 1808, and led to the formation of a state commonly known as the Sokoto Caliphate.

In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was one of the most neglected parts of the African continent, and yet at the same time one of the most culturally sophisticated

In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was one of the most neglected parts of the African continent, and yet at the same time one of the most culturally sophisticated. During this period warfare among the peoples of the eastern Savannah, and in particular the three most significant native states - the Sokoto Caliphate, the ancient kingdom of Bornu, and the somewhat less ancient state of Bagirmi - was largely dominated by cavalry, and a significant proportion of these mounted troops were armored.

19th-century Egyptian monarchs‎ (7 P). Pages in category "19th-century monarchs in Africa". The following 124 pages are in this category, out of 124 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

Kingdom of Bagirmi, historic African state founded in the 16th century in the . In 1894 Massenya was destroyed by the army of the adventurer Rābiḥ az-Zubayr.

Kingdom of Bagirmi, historic African state founded in the 16th century in the region just southeast of Lake Chad. Europeans first learned about the existence of Bagirmi and the other powerful states of central Africa (Wadai Bornu-Kanem) when Dixon Denham penetrated the Lake Chad region in 1823. A vassal of Bornu in the 17th and 18th centuries, it fell to Wadai early in the 19th century and was repeatedly sacked by and forced to pay tribute to both states. Drought and the persecution of Muslim teachers promoted substantial migration out of Bagirmi in the 19th century.

African cuirass, Bornu, 19th to 20th century, iron and leather Dimensions: H. 18 7/8 i. Muhammad Ali Pasha was an Albanian commander in the Ottoman army, who became Wāli and self-declared Khedive of Egypt and Sudan. 18 7/8 in. (4. cm); W. 14 1/4 in. (3. cm); D. 11 in. (2. cm), Met Museum. The Khedive's Army of Egypt (The Turkish Egyptian Army), was part of the Ottoman Imperial Army until the outbreak of war in August 1914, using the same ranks, training, and similar uniforms. Worldantiques Antiques. Khedival Egypt, armor, weapons and info including the Sudanese Mahdist state.

In the 19th century the eastern Savannah (now divided between the countries of Nigeria, Niger, Mali, and Cameroon) was one of the most neglected parts of the African continent, and yet at the same time one of the most culturally sophisticated. During this period warfare among the peoples of the eastern Savannah, and in particular the three most significant native states – the Sokoto Caliphate, the ancient kingdom of Bornu, and the somewhat less ancient state of Bagirmi – was largely dominated by cavalry, and a significant proportion of these mounted troops were armored. This groundbreaking book covers the period that began with the Sokoto jihad in 1804 and ended with the extinction of the Savannah states by the European colonial powers at the turn of the 20th century. In addition to providing a brief outline history of the three states, it examines in detail the arms, equipment and methods of warfare used by their armored ‘knights’ and infantry, and includes in addition sections on their horses, artillery, flags, fortifications, and clothing. It is illustrated throughout with contemporary photographs and engravings.
Comments: (2)
Washington
An excellent reference on African history in the 19th C. The author is obviously enthused on the subject, the photo quality is good, and the text is well laid out. If you are studying African history, this book should be on your shelf.
Ochach
For those interested in Colonial warfare, there is something appealing about armies of heavy cavalary in quilted armor tooling around the African Savannah. This is just the sort obscure topic a well meaning enthusiast can bite his teeth into. "The African Knights" has all the virtues and weaknesses of an enthusiast's project. The book is well illustrated and the writing is earnest and workman like. Unfortunately, Conrad Cairns does not have the story teller's gift. The book is truncated and feels episodic in nature. If this topic interests you, spend the money and effort to read Joseph P. Smaldone's scholarly "Warfare in the Sokoto Caliphate". You might also enjoy Douglas Porch's highly entertaining "The Conquest of the Sahara". Both Smaldone and Porch are professional historians and you will immediately see the difference between the work of a well meaning enthusiast and a professional.