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eBook Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy) download

by Amy Mullin

eBook Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy) download ISBN: 052184438X
Author: Amy Mullin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (March 14, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 226
ePub: 1158 kb
Fb2: 1934 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr lrf docx lit
Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Womens Health

Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge ; New York. Cambridge University Press, (c)2005. Physical Description: ix, 214 p. ;, 24 cm. Title: Cambridge studies in philosophy and public policy

Publication, Distribution, et. Title: Cambridge studies in philosophy and public policy. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-211) and index. Rubrics: Pregnancy Moral and ethical aspects Social aspects Human reproduction Feminism Child care Pregnant Women psychology Child Care ethics Maternal-Fetal Relations Parenting Socioeconomic Factors

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare : Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor. Amy Mullin considers both parenting and paid childcare, and examines the impact of disability on this work.

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare : Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor.

We will read Amy Mullin’s. Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, experience, and reproductive labor. Both authors argue that there is something unique to women’s experience of pregnancy and childrearing

We will read Amy Mullin’s. and Lisa Baraitser’s. Maternal Encounters: The ethics of interruption. Both authors argue that there is something unique to women’s experience of pregnancy and childrearing. However, they take significantly different approaches to this topic. Mullin draws upon the work of phenomenologists, dependency theorists, and care ethicists. From this perspective, she claims that attending to women’s experience will allow us to form a new understanding of pregnancy and childrearing.

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge .

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge University Press, 2005). Selected Articles: Forthcoming Art, Imagination and Re-visioning the Maternal in Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: The Power of Critical Vision and Creative Engagement, ed. L. Ryan Musgrave, Springer, 2020. Children’s Hope, Resilience and Autonomy, Ethics and Social Welfare 2019, 13:3, 230-243. Nurturing Hope to Support Autonomy: The Role of Early Childhood Educators, Theorizing feminist ethics of care in early childhood practice ed. Rachel Langford

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare. Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor.

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare. Throughout this book I have argued for increased recognition of pregnancy, birthing, and childrearing as social activities that involve simultaneously physical, intellectual, emotional, and moral work from those who undertake them. This work calls for a number of skills and also requires broad social support if it is to be done well by pregnant women, birthing women, and male and female providers of childcare in a number of different kinds of social circumstance. The first three chapters of this book were devoted to philosophical analysis of pregnancy.

Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy: Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics .

Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy: Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and . Making Babies: Biomedical Technologies, Reproductive Ethics, and Public Policy. Netherlands: Springer, 1998. Simonstein, Frida, ed.

Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy). New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Everything Conceivable: How the Science of Assisted Reproduction Is Changing Our World.

This highly original book argues for increased recognition of pregnancy, birthing and childrearing as social activities demanding simultaneously physical, intellectual, emotional and moral work from those who undertake them. The first chapters contest misconceptions about pregnancy and birth such as the idea that pregnancy is only valued for its end result, and not also for the process.

When philosophers have turned their attention to the ethics of. .Pregnancy and birth can be approached from many philosophical angles

When philosophers have turned their attention to the ethics of reproduction, they have mostly focused on abortion, and to a lesser extent on various assisted reproductive technologies used to create a pregnancy. However, a number of thorny ethical issues can arise during the course of a continuing pregnancy, labor, and birth, and these are receiving growing attention in bioethics. Pregnancy and birth can be approached from many philosophical angles. Pregnancy raises interesting issues in philosophy of law, such as the appropriate legal status of the fetus and whether pregnancy ought to be legally classified as a disability.

Amy Mullin, Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge .

Amy Mullin, Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), fo. 6. rossRefGoogle Scholar. 44. Eisenberg, Murkoff, and Hathaway, What to Expect When You’re Expecting Pregnancy Organizer (New York: Workman Publishing, 1995).

This book argues for increased recognition of pregnancy, birthing and childrearing as social activities demanding simultaneously physical, intellectual, emotional and moral work from those who undertake them. Amy Mullin considers both parenting and paid childcare, and examines the impact of disability on this work. The first chapters contest misconceptions about pregnancy and birth such as the idea that pregnancy is only valued for its end result, and not for the process. Subsequent chapters focus on childcare provided in different circumstances and on the needs of both providers and receivers of care.