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eBook Creativity Workout: 62 Exercises to Unlock Your Most Creative Ideas download

by Edward De Bono

eBook Creativity Workout: 62 Exercises to Unlock Your Most Creative Ideas download ISBN: 1569756406
Author: Edward De Bono
Publisher: Ulysses Press; 1/31/08 edition (March 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1609 kb
Fb2: 1401 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: doc lit mobi rtf
Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Psychology and Counseling

Most creativity books offer the same idea in one form or another. Tarot cards are a nifty way to accomplish random stimulation. This book includes 62 creativity exercises that use random words to train your creative skills.

Most creativity books offer the same idea in one form or another. The exercises can be used for self training to sharpen your creative thinking skills as well as for producing actual creative results individually or in a group. I have used some of the methods tought in the book in creativity workshops I'm conducting and I have to say the results were very impressive.

Creativity Workout book. Learn to unlock these abilities with Creativity Workout. In 62 excercises designed by Edward de Bono, the world's leading creativity expert, you'll discover how to tap into your most original thinking. Each exercise is fun and simple and will get you in the creative state of mind necessary to think yourself to success. You'll learn to:,make connections. People like to use random words because it really frees them and easily gets their thougths out of the box.

The famed creative thinking expert Edward de Bono presents quick and fun exercises to improve ones creative thinking. Learn to unlock these abilities with Creativity Workout

The famed creative thinking expert Edward de Bono presents quick and fun exercises to improve ones creative thinking. In the time wasted doing the daily newspaper sudoku, you can do one of the exercises in this book and better develop a truly vital skill. Tap into your creative potential. You'll learn to: - make connections. think beyond your peers.

add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Learn to unlock these abilities with Creativity Workout. You'll learn to: -make connections. recognize possibilities. create opportunities show more. Format Paperback 177 pages.

Creativity Workout: 62 Exercises to Unlock Your Most Creative Ideas .

Creativity Workout: 62 Exercises to Unlock Your Most Creative Ideas (Large. In 1967 de Bono invented the now commonly used term 'lateral thinking' and, for many thousands, indeed millions, of people worldwide, his name has since become a symbol of creativity and new thinking.

Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques. If brainstorming is the only tool in your creative thinking toolbox, then you have not read this book. 5 Exercises to Get Your Creativity Unstuck. Find this Pin and more on Best Books Creativity by Denny McCorkle. Creative Activities Creative Skills Creative Art Boost Creativity Drawing Exercises Arts Ed Creativity Exercises High Art Haiku. The book "Unstuck" features 52 exercises, divided by time commitment, to help you beat creative block. Here we sample 5 for a work-week's worth of inspiration. Phases Design Studio. Inspiration for Designers.

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Another book by creative great Steven Johnson, Where Good Ideas Come . In this book Kelley shows you how you can do exactly that and start to unlock your brains potential.

Another book by creative great Steven Johnson, Where Good Ideas Come From looks at how certain individuals, certain societies, and certain companies come up with all the great ideas. He identifies seven patterns that are behind the greatest innovations of the ages. A wonderful book for anyone looking to unleash their creative side, but struggling to find the time. Danny Gregory fills Art Before Breakfast with practical advice and techniques for always finding the space to be creative. 24. Creativity, Inc. – Ed Catmull.

TAP INTO YOUR CREATIVE POTENTIALCreativity was once thought to be a talent bestowed upon a lucky few. Today it is understood as a skill that we can all learn, develop and apply. And in today's economy--with information available to everyone and support services outsourced overseas--creativity is the most valuable asset you can possess and the best way to get ahead.Learn to unlock these abilities with Creativity Workout. In 62 excercises designed by Edward de Bono, the world's leading creativity expert, you'll discover how to tap into your most original thinking. Each exercise is fun and simple and will get you in the creative state of mind necessary to think yourself to success.You'll learn to:•make connections•think beyond your peers•recognize possibilities•create opportunities
Comments: (7)
Funky
This book offers, essentially, a collection of ways to manipulate words randomly selected from the tables provided. The idea seems to be that these exercises will develop creativity skills that will be applicable in daily life. My main objection to this book is that no evidence is provided that this will actually work.

Other objections regard how the material is presented. The Introduction seems to be a random scattering of badly-written and often crackpot thoughts about creativity, the mind, the modern world, and the brilliance of the author. It's an embarrassment. An example: he says that 2000 years ago China was ahead of the West, but they subsequently fell behind because they neglected the importance of "possibility." I quote:

"What brought progress to a halt?
"The Chinese scholars started to believe you could move from 'fact to fact.' So they never developed the messy business of possibility (hypothesis, etc.). As a result, progress came to a dead end." (p. 7)

He goes on to criticize four major universities, including Harvard, for neglecting the fundamental importance of possibility. But he does not define what he means by "possibility," except in the already quoted "(hypothesis, etc.)." Literally, he rants about "possibility" for a full page (large print, lots of white space) but never makes clear what he means. "(hypothesis, etc.)" seems to suggest "scientific method." But he couldn't claim that Harvard neglects "scientific method," I presume. So the Introduction is pretty useless unless you need a pep talk on the wonderfulness of creativity.

I don't want to waste a lot of time on this book. Let's take a close look at one "exercise," the first of the 62. If you find this valuable, maybe this book is for you. It is called "Random Input." I'll quote the "Process" section in full:

"1. You clearly define your focus. Where and why do you want new creative ideas? It is important to be very clear about the focus. If you do not know what you are shooting at, you are very unlikely to hit the target!
2. You obtain a Random Word from the tables--using any of the methods indicated on pages 15-16.
3. You use the Random Word to stimulate new ideas for the defined focus." (p. 19)

So the process boils down to two critical points: "Where and why do you want new creative ideas?" and "stimulate." I think the "focus" is generally clear enough; but what about "stimulate"? He offers six points on "The Use of the Method"; of these, four warn you off of mistakes to avoid, such as taking the Random Word as an acronym and trying to figure out the words it stand for. These are nothing much. The two positive suggestions are these:

"4. You will probably need to work in concepts and values rather than simple associations.
5. At every point, look out for possibilities, values and new directions. Once a possibility has emerged, pursue that possibility." (p. 21)

This bears no resemblance to a step-by-step method.

He then goes on to describe using the Random Word "cloak" to stimulate "a new idea for a new restaurant." In this example, he presents "Immediate thoughts" and "Further thoughts." He makes no attempt to relate these "thoughts" to the previously-described "method." He summarizes his results in two conclusions:

"It is clear that two directions have emerged. The first direction is a 'theme' direction associated with 'cloak.'
The second direction is to do with the concept of 'cloaked,' 'masked,' 'disguised,' or 'hidden.'" (p. 22)

What he means by a "theme direction" is that the "new idea for a new restaurant" is to have a "cloak theme." His "second direction" could be more easily accomplished by checking a thesaurus under the heading "cloak."

I'm trying to be fair here and not just ridicule his results. In fact, the first exercise, "Random Input," seems to be the most thoroughly developed of the 62. I haven't read most of the others; they are shorter and the first half dozen offer nothing more interesting than the first one. But on looking ahead I see one about novel writing. I'll go ahead and post this and add more comments as I get further in the book--if I do. As it is, I'm allowing three stars for, really, no good reason. The reviews here so far are as sketchy and unsatisfactory as the book itself.

The first exercise constitutes an example of de Bono's "Lateral Thinking," as he points out. What's lacking here is the attention he pays to that concept in his book of that name (Lateral Thinking) which I read many decades ago. I found that book to be valuable and original, and I'd even say that I have returned to that concept on many occasions--it really affected my thinking in a positive way, and the term has become justly celebrated. Unfortunately, I think that de Bono has made a career of exploiting his early success with a series of increasingly thin and superficial rehashes on "creativity and how to get it." By all means, read de Bono's early books in preference to this one.

As for this book, I was looking specifically for a book on "things to do with word lists" because a few years ago I came up with some lists of what I call "tasty words" and I wanted to use these lists in some kind of systematic way to generate ideas for stories and poems. His first exercise, "Random Input," doesn't offer much of a method. If I try to apply it to the "focus" of "idea for a new poem," I would have "a poem about a cloak, or masking, or etc." I suppose that's better than nothing. But I think that if I look over a list of tasty words with the thought in mind of "new poem," I'd get at least this much. If I take a tasty word at random, and try to force it to give me an idea of a poem, I'd essentially have de Bono's "method."

This is not the first book to suggest using random stimulation to generate ideas. Most creativity books offer the same idea in one form or another. Tarot cards are a nifty way to accomplish random stimulation.

Further comments will follow.
Kakashkaliandiia
If you need a mental workout to keep your mind stimulated, or are stymied for ideas, this book will help. It is a course on manipulating words into ideas to help with problem solving. The book shows you how to link and build on ideas. The book also shows you how to work with number mapping. In the back there are word and number tables to use during a creativity session. This book can be used for anything from writing to project management. The subject matter is not easy to master, but nothing worthwhile is. This would be a very good ice breaker for team meetings and training classes.
Jonariara
We used this book in an MBA class. It was fun, but mostly because the instructor had a sense of humor about OUR sense of humor. You see, if you have trouble coming up with a random word, there's a table of appropriate random words in the back. That struck us as the funniest thing ever. This DeBono guy, he's pretty much the most Type A, uncreative, "creativity expert" ever. (We had to watch some of this videos.) That said, I have nieces & nephews who enjoy word-games so I might actually use this out of context for the fun of it... ignoring the table of random words.
TheMoonix
I am a teacher and I bought this book to have some short little exercises for students to do at the beginning of my class. I know the title is 62 Exercises...but I really only used a few of them. Many repeat the same basic idea.
Vetibert
This book should have been called: "Using the power of Random Words to boost your creativity", or "Random Words, Creative Thoughts". But the chances of me buying the book with such a title would have been slim, so I'm glad De Bono did not consult me on this.
This book includes 62 creativity exercises that use random words to train your creative skills. The exercises can be used for self training to sharpen your creative thinking skills as well as for producing actual creative results individually or in a group.
I have used some of the methods tought in the book in creativity workshops I'm conducting and I have to say the results were very impressive. People like to use random words because it really frees them and easily gets their thougths out of the box.
The usual De Bono style is evident - a bit of self praise and paranoia coupled with great in-depth insights and detailed instructions.
PanshyR
De Bono is the world renowned expert in creativity training and development, and he isn't afraid to let you know (smile). The introduction was probably the best part of the book, though it seems De Bono is somewhat arrogant (my take). The exercises are very repetitive- all based on using his random word lists. I would like to see more creativity in his creativity training.

I found it tedious to select words from his list randomly. Using DeBono's book one has to first consult a table of random numbers, or else roll 4 die, then use these numbers to index a single word. Too slow and makes one not want to follow up with more training. I can think of much better ways to find random words, so I must be pretty creative already (sarcasm).

The concept and method DeBono uses, however, I consider solid and worthy of use. Just find a faster simpler way.
deadly claw
Great book...came in on time as promised. The condition of the book was very good, just as advertised. Very pleased.
The exercises are ridiculously superficial. Pick a word and come up with as many ideas as you can by using that word. Give me a break.