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eBook 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior download

by Steven Jay Lynn,John Ruscio,Barry L. Beyerstein,Scott O. Lilienfeld

eBook 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior download ISBN: 1405131128
Author: Steven Jay Lynn,John Ruscio,Barry L. Beyerstein,Scott O. Lilienfeld
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (September 28, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1628 kb
Fb2: 1994 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Psychology and Counseling

A new book does an excellent job of mythbusting: 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology. Steven Jay Lynn is a Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at Binghamton

A new book does an excellent job of mythbusting: 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology. Some myths I had swallowed whole and the book's carefully presented evidence made me change my mind. Everything is meticulously documented with sources listed. Steven Jay Lynn is a Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at Binghamton. He is past President of the APA's Division of Psychological Hypnosis, and the recipient of the Chancellor's Award of the SUNY for Scholarship and Creative Activities.

Similar books to 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering .

Similar books to 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior (Great Myths of Psychology). Virtually every day, the news media, television shows, films, and Internet bombard us with claims regarding a host of psychological topics: psychics, out of body experiences, recovered memories, and lie detection, to name merely a few.

Scott O. Lilienfeld is a Professor of Psychology at Emory University. Barry L. Beyerstein (the late) was Professor of Psychology at Simon Fraser University and chair of the British Columbia Skeptics Society

Scott O. He is a recipient of the 1998 David Shakow Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Clinical Psychology from Division 12 (Society for Clinical Psychology) of the APA, past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology, and a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Beyerstein (the late) was Professor of Psychology at Simon Fraser University and chair of the British Columbia Skeptics Society.

50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior serves as an educational guide to critical thinking about psychology. Contained inside are 11 chapters categorizing the 50 into subtopics of psychology. This book discusses a number of most widespread and believed myths of popular psychology – a type of psychology that is not based on scientifically proven facts but are well known by the general public – and helps people learn how identify false claims

0 1 5 Author: John Ruscio,Scott O. Lilienfeld,Steven Jay Lynn,Barry L. Beyerstein Narrator: Walter Dixon. thinking skills through detailed discussions of each myth Includes over 200 additional psychological myths for listeners to explore Contains an Appendix of useful Web Sites for examining psychological myths. Download books offline, listen to several books continuously, choose stories for your kids, or try out a book that you didn't thought you would like to listen to.

Start by marking 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering . Psychological Myths/popular beliefs which should not anymore be believed without question: 1. Most people use only 10% of their brain power. This can be translated otherwise

Start by marking 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This can be translated otherwise. As it is said in the book, for even a simple task almost all parts of the brain become engaged. Lilienfeld is a Professor of Psychology at Emory University "Maybe we should pay more attention to books like 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Nature. Maybe we should pay more attention to books like 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Nature.

The authors use popular myths as a vehicle for distinguishing science from pseudoscience. The way in which the history of the myths is presented up to the critical but balanced discussion of each myth, is a great achievement. Organized around key topic areas of modern psychology such as brain functioning, perception, development, memory, emotion, intelligence, learning, personality, mental illness, and psychotherapy, this book will help students and laypersons to critically evaluate the information and misinformation that is generated by popular psychology"-From publisher description.

by Scott O. Lilienfeld & Steven Jay Lynn & John Ruscio & Barry L. . Beyerstein. Come let us be friends for once. 50 Great Myths of Human Evolution: Understanding Misconceptions about Our Origins. 38 MB·81 Downloads·New! 0 Great Myths of Human Evolution uses common misconceptions to explore basic theory and rese. The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes us Happier, Healthier and More Creative. 03 MB·86,949 Downloads.

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Comments: (7)
Hiclerlsi
This is an intriguing idea, but I felt the book stumbled on several levels.

First, the authors use an overly broad definition of 'myths'. I expected them to address myths that are widely accepted, such that most readers would be surprised to learn that their assumptions were wrong. But many chapters are about things which are widely believed, but not widely accepted.

If that distinction sounds murky, I'll use creationism as a clear example. About 40% of Americans believe in creationism,so it is widely believed -- but it's not widely accepted. If a lot of thoughtful writing began with the premise, "Everybody knows that God created humans in their present form, therefore...." then it would be a myth that needs debunking. But I've never seen any thoughtful writing based on that premise.

The authors do not address creationism, and there's no reason for them to; that crowd isn't likely to read this book. But they do include ESP as one of their myths -- 41% of Americans believe ESP exists, according to a Gallup poll. But those believers aren't likely to pick up this book, either.

Often, the authors overstate a belief so they can knock it down, such as "Myth #7: Adolescence is inevitably a time of psychological turmoil." By inserting "inevitably" they make it easy to disprove this. But how many people really think that adolescents ALWAYS go through turmoil? Perhaps I would have over-estimated the percentage (and just what is "turmoil", anyway?) but that doesn't mean there's a myth to be shattered, it just proves we can't all be up-to-date on every psychological study.

Myth #4: "Visual perceptions are accompanied by tiny emissions from the eyes." Do a lot of people truly believe this? I never suspected. But... so what? Let 'em believe. It makes no difference to me, and probably not to them either. If such beliefs are widespread, that's an interesting bit of trivia, but there's no need for a debunking crusade.

A few chapters did address issues on which it appears that I too readily swallowed conventional wisdom, and I was glad to see a contrarian position. But only a few.

50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior (Great Myths of Psychology) 1st Edition, Kindle Edition
by Scott O. Lilienfeld (Author), Steven Jay Lynn (Author), John Ruscio (Author), Barry L. Beyerstein (Author)

The subtitle, "Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior," is also over-reaching. Nothing is shattered here. I read some chapters, quickly skimmed others, and found no new thinking or analysis, they've simply collected data about some fuzzy ideas that float around. And much of it borders on trivial.

There were several other annoyances. Amazon says you can highlight and take notes in the eBook edition, but on my Kindle I could not. The authors endlessly insert source references such as this (Smith and Jones, 2005) parenthetically into the text, as many as five times on a page. This would have been less intrusive as chapter notes at the end.

For a lower-priced book I might feel more forgiving. This was not worth the relatively high price.

As a highly entertaining, less expensive, and very on-target book that covers similar though not identical material, I highly recommend Ben Goldacre's "I Think You'll Find It's a Bit More Complicated."
Gavigamand
Here are some myths I had always assumed had some truth in them: some people are left-brained, others right-brained; adolescence is always a time of psychological turmoil; when dying, or when loved ones die, people pass through five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance); intelligence tests are biased against certain groups of people; men and women communicate in very different ways (Mars vs. Venus); most people who were sexually abused as children develop personality disturbances in adulthood; adult children of alcoholics display distinctive symptoms; the incidence of autism has increased; abstinence is the only realistic option for alcoholics; shock therapy is physically dangerous and immoral. It turns out that there is no good evidence for any of these.

The method of this book is to describe a myth, to give survey evidence that most people believe it, to trace the source of the myth and to give experimental evidence showing that the myth is not true.

All of us read or hear such myths, and because we hear them so often, and because they are so often the basis of television shows and movies, we come to believe there is some truth in them. But unfortunately most of the time they are nothing more than folk tales. I was pleased to learn that there is a whole industry dedicated to finding out whether they are true or false. But I kept wondering what measures I could take to avoid assimilating false information, other than to forswear all television, movies, newspapers and the internet. I also kept wondering whether it is possible to know anything much about the psychology of human beings.

This book is measured, insightful, thorough and enlightening. One annoyance is that on virtually every page you will find words separated arbitrarily by spaces: gen erate, par ents, dis etangling, experi ment, uni versity, person ality, astonish ment, advant age, etc. I cannot imagine why this got through.