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eBook Churchill's Black Dog, Kafka's Mice, and Other Phenomena of the Human Mind download

by Anthony Storr

eBook Churchill's Black Dog, Kafka's Mice, and Other Phenomena of the Human Mind download ISBN: 034536547X
Author: Anthony Storr
Publisher: Ballantine Books (June 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 310
ePub: 1172 kb
Fb2: 1699 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mobi mbr docx
Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Psychology and Counseling

Anthony Storr asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work.

Anthony Storr asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work.

In other pieces, Kafka's existential insecurity is traced to his parents' prolonged absences during his childhood . rated the book as excellent. I bought the book, read it and came to two conclusions.

In other pieces, Kafka's existential insecurity is traced to his parents' prolonged absences during his childhood, while Isaac Newton, a self-punishing hypochondriac with a paranoid streak, is seen gaining mastery over the universe in reaction to his exaggerated sense of helplessness as an infant.

Start by marking Churchill's Black Dog, Kafka's Mice, and Other . Anthony Storr was an English psychiatrist and author. He was a child who was to endure the typical trauma of early 20th century UK boarding schools.

Start by marking Churchill's Black Dog, Kafka's Mice, and Other Phenomena of the Human Mind as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He was educated at Winchester, Christ's College, the University of Cambridge and Westminster Hospital. He qualified as a doctor in 1944, and subsequently specialized in psychiatry. Storr grew up to be kind and insightful, yet, as his obituary states, Anthony Storr was an English psychiatrist and author.

Creative ability, Creative ability, Genius and mental illness, Personality, Psychology. New York : Grove Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on June 22, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Three pieces deal with how Churchill, Kafka, and Newton were driven by their neuroses to use their creative . Essays on creativity, destructiveness, and other matters, by the eminent British psychiatrist Storr (Solitude: A Return to the Self, 1988).

Three pieces deal with how Churchill, Kafka, and Newton were driven by their neuroses to use their creative gifts-which, in turn, helped them stave off breakdowns and depressions. In ""The Sanity of True Genius,"" Storr finds creative people more likely to suffer mental illness, but also more able to ward it off through creative work Essays on creativity, destructiveness, and other matters, by the eminent British psychiatrist Storr (Solitude: A Return to the Self, 1988). Three pieces deal with how Churchill, Kafka, and Newton were driven by their neuroses to use their creative gifts-which, in turn, helped them stave off breakdowns and depressions.

Charles Anthony Storr, May 18, 1920 - March 17, 2001 Charles Anthony Storr was born on May 18, 1920 in London to a Reverend of Westminster Abbey and his wife. The two were first cousins, which may have lead to his poor health and depression. At the age of eight, he attended public school at Winchester and was very unhappy. He graduated from Winchester College and proceeded to Christ's Church in Cambridge where he met C. P. Snow who encouraged him to be moral and compassionate. Storr continued his medical studies at Westminster Hospital from 1941 to 1944, and then became a house physician.

Anthony Storr weighs and tests Freud's theory that creativity is the result of dissatisfaction by examining the impulses which drove such figures as Churchill, Kafka and Newton.

Anthony Storr weighs and tests Freud's theory that creativity is the result of dissatisfaction by examining the impulses which drove such figures as Churchill, Kafka and Newton

The essays by Anthony Storr in this uneven volume are tenuously tied together by the theme of creativity. Much of the evidence marshaled by Storr to validate his hypotheses about Churchill and others comes from this own rather idiosyncratic and eclectic approach to psychiatry.

The essays by Anthony Storr in this uneven volume are tenuously tied together by the theme of creativity. This is not to say that he does not utilize Churchill's own writings in his attempts to understand the man, but that he too often gives equal credence to his own biases.

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In this collection of mini-psycho-biographies, Storr contends that Winston Churchill's brave defiance of Hitler's onslaughter owed much to another battle the politician wagedhis lifelong bout with depression, which Churchill nicknamed "Black Dog." In his discussion of the relationship between genius and pathology, the author, a well-known British psychiatrist, makes much of Churchill's wet nurse and his "oral" personality, greedy for approval. In other pieces, Kafka's existential insecurity is traced to his parents' prolonged absences during his childhood, while Isaac Newton, a self-punishing hypochondriac with a paranoid streak, is seen gaining mastery over the universe in reaction to his exaggerated sense of helplessness as an infant.
Comments: (7)
Vuzahn
Sometimes I wonder if curiosity will get the best of me... I stumbled into this rare intellectual roller coaster ride, essentially falling head first into an exciting series of psychological case studies which truly gave my imagination a run for it's money. I picked up this book yesterday night and couldn't put it down. Elegantly crafted prose and masterful analytical dexterity give 'Churchill's Black Dog' a genuinely awe-inducing momentum--one is drawn in so effortlessly the only thing to do is throw up your hands and settle in for the duration. I had no intention of getting hooked on the whole of the text since my initial interest was confined to the chapters about Churchill and Kafka--but such intentions quickly fell by the wayside as I delved deeper into Storr's inspired, inquisitive journey through the annals of genius, manic-depression, madness, creativity, and through the lives of some of the most stunning, mysterious personas which continue to shape the modern world. I have one chapter left and I don't want to see the last page. I completely forgot myself in this book--and dread the idea that I will have to return to the other books I am currently reading, including a Tolkien-esqe fantasy that cannot compete with the ingenuity and literary style of Storr's exquisite compilation of essays. Fiction just cannot compete with the bizarre anthologies of the real world. I cannot believe this book is out of print (if, as another reviewer commented, it really is). I'm just surprised it was first published in 1965--it reads as if it were published last month. It might be out of date with respect to the state of psychoanalysis today, but unless one was well versed in such fields it would be almost impossible to tell otherwise. Highly highly highly recommended. Don't let this book slip through your fingers!
Shadowbourne
well worth anyone's time
Adrietius
good condition, as described
Water
Excellent!
Deeroman
Churchill and Newton analyses are particularly interesting of course.
The book does not reveal, but it is true, that Storr himself suffered from some of the same life experiences as Churchill.
Such as being sent to a boarding school at age 8.
Sensitively written,insightful, well worthwhile reading
Diab
I usually buy books based on reviews. The review I read with regard to Churchill's Black Dog.... rated the book as excellent. I bought the book, read it and came to two conclusions. First, the review, although it asseessed the book as excellent, underrated Churchill's Black Dog.... Second, the title was poor. A better title would have been "Phenomena of the Human Mind."
Jozrone
I can't imagine why this book is out of print. The author challenges the notion that those plagued by mental illness or glitches of the mind must be "fixed." Instead, these struggles can be used for good.