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eBook Introducing The Freud Wars: A Graphic Guide download

by Oscar Zarate,Stephen Wilson

eBook Introducing The Freud Wars: A Graphic Guide download ISBN: 1840463813
Author: Oscar Zarate,Stephen Wilson
Publisher: Icon Books (January 14, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 176
ePub: 1823 kb
Fb2: 1540 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf txt
Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Psychology and Counseling

Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis's most contested figure. Freud is universally recognized as a pivotal figure in modern culture. Yet the man and his work continually attract scandal, outrage and scientific suspicion

Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis's most contested figure. Yet the man and his work continually attract scandal, outrage and scientific suspicion. Was he a psychological genius or a peddler of humbug? Despite his atheism, did he invent a new religious cult? Is he to blame for disguising the prevalence of sexual abuse? Is there an Oedipus Complex? Was he a drug addict? A wittily illustrated glimpse behind the demonized myths to the heart of a red-hot debate. Categories: Psychology.

Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis's most contested figure.

Introducing the Enlightenment: A Graphic Guide. Freud has been described as an evil genius and one of the world’s great hypocrites

Introducing the Enlightenment: A Graphic Guide. Introducing Shakespeare: A Graphic Guide. Freud has been described as an evil genius and one of the world’s great hypocrites. And if all this were not enough, his theories have been blamed for alienating us from ourselves and undermining the very values upon which the whole of Western civilization is based. The Death of Psychoanalysis.

Oscar Zarate is one of the UK's leading graphic artists. He has illustrated numerous Introducing titles. His graphic novel A Small Killing won the Will Eisner Prize. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1. This shopping feature will continue to load items. He has illustrated numerous Introducing titles

Oscar Zarate is one of the UK's leading graphic artists. I challenge anyone who doubts this to examine the appendices of Jeffery Moussaieff Masson's famous critique of Freud's theories entitled "The Assault on Truth. The mistake Masson makes in his book is an unconscionable one: He offers up a critique that is much weaker than the examples of Freud's theoretical analyses intended to be exposed as flaws?

Introducing the Freud Wars: A Graphic Guide - Introducing series (Paperback). Freud is universally recognised as a pivotal figure in modern culture. Yet the man and his work continually attract scandal, outrage and scientific suspicion

Introducing the Freud Wars: A Graphic Guide - Introducing series (Paperback). Stephen Wilson (author), Oscar Zarate (author,illustrator). Was he a psychological genius or a peddler of humbug? Despite his atheism, did he invent a new religious cult? Is he to blame for disguising the prevalence of sexual abuse? Is there an Oedipus Complex? Was he a drug addict? A wittily illustrated glimpse behind the demonised myths to the heart of a red-hot debate.

Introducing the Freud Wars: A Graphic Guide - Introducing. Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis's most contested figure. Stephen Wilson (author), Oscar Zarate (illustrator). Paperback 176 Pages, Published: 06/09/2012. Was he a psychological genius or a peddler of humbug? Despite his atheism, did he invent a new religious cult? Is he to blame for disguising the prevalence of sexual abuse? Is there an Oedipus Complex?

Introducing Freud" successfully demystifies the facts of Freud's discovery of psychoanalysis.

Introducing Freud" successfully demystifies the facts of Freud's discovery of psychoanalysis. Irreverent and witty but never trivial, the book tells the story of Freud's life and ideas from his upbringing in 19th-century Vienna, his early medical career and his encounter with cocaine, to the gradual evolution of his theories on the unconscious, dreams and sexuality. Freud revolutionized the way we think about ourselves. His psychoanalytic terms such as Id, Ego, libido, neurosis and Oedipus Complex have become a part of our everyday vocabulary. But do we know what they really mean? "Introducing Freud" successfully demystifies the facts of Freud's discovery of psychoanalysis.

Introducing the Freud Wars (Paperback). Stephen Wilson, Oscar Zarate. Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis’s most contested figure

Introducing the Freud Wars (Paperback). Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis’s most contested figure. Was he a psychological genius or a peddler of humbug? Despite his atheism, did he invent a new religious cult? Is he to blame for disguising the prevalence of sexual abuse? Is there an Oedipus Complex? Was he a drug addict?

Compact INTRODUCING guide on the debates surrounding psychoanalysis's most contested figure. Freud is universally recognized as a pivotal figure in modern culture. Yet the man and his work continually attract scandal, outrage and scientific suspicion. Was he a psychological genius or a peddler of humbug? Despite his atheism, did he invent a new religious cult? Is he to blame for disguising the prevalence of sexual abuse? Is there an Oedipus Complex? Was he a drug addict? A wittily illustrated glimpse behind the demonized myths to the heart of a red-hot debate.
Comments: (6)
Nalmergas
This is clearly written in an enjoyable fashion that is necessary to help demystify the mythology that Freud spent his whole life creating. If you live in 1897 or 1927 you might believe that Freudville is a great place to live. If you don't think that addictive minds are self driven for their own glorification then Freudville is a the place for you and your children. Especially, the little girls who can be told that they are second rate human beings because they do not have a penis. And, of course, that this "...impressive unscientific mythology..." (Harris, p.75, Waking Up) is of true value along with Blavatsky who believed and promoted in 1875 that she was in contact with the "Great White Brotherhood." She was in psychic contact with the members of this brotherhood of course. Just as Freud was in psychic contact with the "unconscious" minds of his patients and could somehow interpreted their dreams. This was right before they gave him the money they owed him of course. Dream on and make sure you check out the Scientology website. Oh yes, and you might want to read William James' comments on the unconscious that were written 25 years before Freud's book on the unconscious. Fifteen arguments against the existence of an unconscious. Strangely enough, Freud use the flip side of these arguments in his "monumental contribution" to the world of psychology. But, yes, of course Freud "discovered" the unconscious--right?
Bys
Not bad. Information that helps round out an understanding.
Wat!?
I started with Introducing Quantum physics--and then was hooked on to this series. I got this book and the one on Jung together, it is amazing how much we have travelled in such a short period of time in psychiatric care, and how much these two have influenced even our current thought process. Its easy to see now ( at least for me)-- how Aristotles' thoughts held sway for a thousand years before anyone even questioned them.
Burgas
5 stars
Lamranilv
Sigmund Freud was great at two things for which he seldom gets enough credit: He was a "big picture ideas man," and a researcher of incomparable skill. In fact, he never wanted to be anything but a researcher -- and he was good at it. I challenge anyone who doubts this to examine the appendices of Jeffery Moussaieff Masson's famous critique of Freud's theories entitled "The Assault on Truth."

The mistake Masson makes in his book is an unconscionable one: He offers up a critique that is much weaker than the examples of Freud's theoretical analyses intended to be exposed as flaws? Thus, in relief, Masson's critique says nothing about Freud's analysis, and everything about Masson's own limited critiquing abilities.

As far as I can discern, this book, "The Freud Wars" is about a clash of ideas, not about science as such, or as practiced by Dr. Sigmund Freud himself. And in the ideas department there is certainly enough room for reasonable men and women to disagree about ideas and hypotheses, as this book aptly demonstrates. However, I think it makes the same category error made by Dr. Masson in attacking Freud's hypotheses rather than the research methods used to prove them, or the resulting findings that flowed from them.

It is true that Freud's theorizing was almost always posited in the form of a series of more or less plausible hypotheses -- a well accepted starting point practiced by most scientists in any field. Freud and his disciples then proceeded systematically to try to prove each of his hypotheses experimentally. Admittedly, his success at proofs were often a mixed bag, but not because he "cut corners" during the research phase. Like the appendices in Masson's book demonstrate, Freud's research was always of impeccably high standards.

As often as not, his proofs ran into difficulties because he was always so far ahead of his times that it was often the case that neither the biological nor the psychological sciences were yet able to provide a sufficient experimental platform or clear path to testing his hypotheses. I believe that throughout the history of science, this has been more the rule rather than the exception. So it does not surprise me that Freud's ideas would remain contentious. Freud's ideas were often novel and always slippery, making his hypotheses difficult to prove even under the best of experimental conditions.

As a result, sometimes Freud's hypothesizing got ahead of proven results, and thus were accepted by his acolytes and disciples as if proofs were "just around the corner," when in fact they remain open and unproven even today. Even Freud himself sometimes "jumped the gun" and proceeded as if proofs were a mere formality, a foregone conclusion as it were: as if the proofs themselves were just a matter of "going through the motions." That he and his disciples did this is regrettable, but these indiscretions cannot be used to stand-in for a body of work that, except for Einstein's Theory of Relativity and Darwin's Theory of Evolution, remains at the top of the intellectual food chain of Western civilization.

And in this regard, I frankly think these "wars over ideas" is a bit misguided, as the "scientific process" has its own built-in protection against over-exuberance or "jumping-the-gun" with unproven hypotheses. It's called "falsification:" No hypothesis is ever finally proven. And the fact that they all remain forever open to further testing and eventually being overthrown, is the very sine qua non of the scientific method Itself.

Arguments about the meaning of the "death instinct," the "Oedipal complex," the "Seduction Theory," or the "pleasure principle" are not quite the same thing as accusing Freud of engaging in sloppy research. The very fact that most of his disciples eventually disagreed with him was itself a sign of the health of the scientific methods they all practiced. If Dr. Freud could not handle the disagreements within his own ranks, as it seems he often could not, then this was a psychological problem, not a problem of science, of proofs, or of research methods.

This was certainly an entertaining read. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants a survey of the Freudian landscape of ideas. Four stars