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eBook Overcoming the Fear of Fear: How to Reduce Anxiety Sensitivity download

by Sherry Stewart,Margo Watt,Steven Taylor

eBook Overcoming the Fear of Fear: How to Reduce Anxiety Sensitivity download ISBN: 1572245581
Author: Sherry Stewart,Margo Watt,Steven Taylor
Publisher: New Harbinger Publications; 1 edition (January 2, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 216
ePub: 1348 kb
Fb2: 1531 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt lrf lrf lit
Category: Health and Diets
Subcategory: Mental Health

This book focuses on primarily on the physical symptoms of reactions to fear and how to overcome them. For the latter, the authors ask the reader to imagine how they would feel if the saw someone go through that.

This book focuses on primarily on the physical symptoms of reactions to fear and how to overcome them. The premise is that people who have high anxiety start with what would normal anxious reactions to an event, which then balloons out of control because the usual symptoms, shaking, nervousness, et. trigger their exponential increase. The culprit here is what the authors call Anxiety Sensitivity, or AS. The theory makes sense and, based on my own experience, us accurate. Initial normal symptoms trigger the first thought of Oh, oh, here we go, which then heightens the physical symptoms.

Anxiety sensitivity is the fear of anxiety-related sensations, a condition .

Anxiety sensitivity is the fear of anxiety-related sensations, a condition that affects approximately 16 percent of the population. People with high anxiety sensitivity often fear these bodily sensations even more than the situation that caused their anxiety in the first place. This fear of fear can lead them to avoid activities that might trigger their symptoms, and can cause other mental and physical problems down the road. Overcoming the Fear of Fear provides you with all the tools you need to stop fearing your anxiety symptoms for good. These techniques can help you reduce your anxiety sensitivity, prevent recurrence of panic attacks, and start living without fear. People with high anxiety sensitivity often fear these bodily sensations even more than the situation that caused their anxiety in the first place

Anxiety sensitivity is the fear of anxiety-related sensations, a condition that affects approximately 16 percent of the population.

by Sherry Stewart & Margo Watt & Steven Taylor. Don't ruin a good today by thinking about a bad yesterday. Let it go. ― Anonymous. The Philosophy of Psychology.

1 books of Sherry Stewart. Overcoming the Fear of Fear: How to Reduce Anxiety Sensitivity.

By: Sherry Stewart; Margo Watt. Publisher: New Harbinger Publications. Print ISBN: 9781572245587, 1572245581. The world’s eTextbook reader for students. VitalSource is the leading provider of online textbooks and course materials. More than 15 million users have used our Bookshelf platform over the past year to improve their learning experience and outcomes.

Put simply, it’s the fear of fear. In their book, Watt and Stewart outline a approach to reducing anxiety sensitivity. People who are prone to anxiety sensitivity tend to catastrophize, or automatically assume that the worst will happen. For instance, you might fear that your trembling might catch the attention of others or a racing heart might mean a heart attack. Here are a few tips you might find helpful. Changing your Thoughts. The stories we tell ourselves can heighten our anxiety. But the good news is that our stories also can diminish our anxiety.

Overcoming the fear of fear: How to reduce anxiety sensitivity. Oakland: New Harbinger Publications. The relation between anxiety sensitivity and depression in children and adolescents referred for anxiety. Watt, M. Stewart, S. & Cox, B. J. (1998). A retrospective study of the learning history origins of anxiety sensitivity.

Anxiety isn't all in your head. When you feel nervous, symptoms such as chills, sweating, heart palpitations, and shaking can affect your whole body. If you worry that others notice these anxiety symptoms or fear that they could be harmful to your health, you may have anxiety sensitivity. Anxiety sensitivity is the fear of anxiety-related sensations, a condition that affects approximately 16 percent of the population. People with high anxiety sensitivity often fear these bodily sensations even more than the situation that caused their anxiety in the first place. This fear of fear can lead them to avoid activities that might trigger their symptoms, and can cause other mental and physical problems down the road.

Overcoming the Fear of Fear provides you with all the tools you need to stop fearing your anxiety symptoms for good. You'll learn to use cognitive behavioral techniques that have been proven effective for people with anxiety sensitivity. These techniques can help you reduce your anxiety sensitivity, prevent recurrence of panic attacks, and start living without fear.

Comments: (2)
Dikus
I found the book to somewhat unfulfilling in that there was a lot theories in it and not real concrete examples. Could not pinpoint exactly what was missing, but just know it didn't make me say this is a great program and I'll follow it.
Juce
This book focuses on primarily on the physical symptoms of reactions to fear and how to overcome them. The premise is that people who have high anxiety start with what would normal anxious reactions to an event, which then balloons out of control because the usual symptoms, shaking, nervousness, etc., trigger their exponential increase. The culprit here is what the authors call Anxiety Sensitivity, or AS. The theory makes sense and, based on my own experience, us accurate. Initial normal symptoms trigger the first thought of “Oh, oh, here we go”, which then heightens the physical symptoms. The authors prescribe engaging in preventive exercise that mimics symptoms, so that when they appear in a future situation, they are familiar and there power diminishes. This is a version of the exposure therapy against phobias. For example, someone who experiences the fear of fainting would practice the symptom by spinning around on a chair to experience being dizzy (in a safe way, of course). The only advice for nipping the anxiety in the bud is to think at the extreme statistically: what is the likelihood that the thing I fear will happen (plane crashing)? What is the worst that will happen if I go full panic? For the latter, the authors ask the reader to imagine how they would feel if the saw someone go through that. What I found most useful is the idea of separating the initial symptoms (something normal) from the increased symptoms that follow. My analogy would be to think that because you ate one slice of pizza, you will inevitably eat the whole pie. Not true. They are to distinct events.