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eBook An Air That Kills download

by Francis Henry King,Francis King

eBook An Air That Kills download ISBN: 1934555274
Author: Francis Henry King,Francis King
Publisher: Valancourt Books (January 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 212
ePub: 1293 kb
Fb2: 1166 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mbr doc lrf lit
Category: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Francis Henry King CBE (4 March 1923 – 3 July 2011) was a British novelist, poet and short story writer. He worked for the British Council for 15 years, with positions in Europe and Japan.

Francis Henry King CBE (4 March 1923 – 3 July 2011) was a British novelist, poet and short story writer. He was born on 4 March 1923 in Adelboden, Switzerland, to a father in the civil service, brought up in India and sent back to England when his father was dying. As a boy, he was shunted around among aunts and uncles.

An Air That Kills book. Francis Henry King, CBE, was a British novelist, poet and short story writer. King was fairly young when he wrote this book but it has the sophisticated savagery of an old queen. The women are either pathetic or depraved creatures which "repulse" the civilized men. The fey young men and aging bachelors are desperate cartoons. He was born in Adelboden, Switzerland, brought up in India and educated at Shrewsbury School and Balliol College, Oxford.

By (author) Francis Henry King. Published in 1948, An Air That Kills is the third of Francis King's more than thirty novels. Widely acclaimed as one of the finest novelists of his generation, King displays in this early work all the imaginative energy and ardour of a young writer dealing with a theme which he clearly felt profoundly. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Francis King is a writer who has been around for a long time. He was born in 1923 and published his first book, To the Dark Tower, when he was 23 and an undergraduate at Oxford. His 40-plus works include poems, stories and autobiography. Later he says that that other writer died a long, long time ago.

King Francis (originally Prince Francis) was The Dauphin of France, later ascending to the throne as King Francis II after his father, King Henry II died. Francis was the son of the late King Henry and Queen Catherine. He married Queen Mary of Scotland, to whom he had been betrothed to since they were children. Before his marriage, Francis had a son, John Philip with Lady Lola out of wedlock.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9781934555279. Release Date:January 2008. Publisher:Valancourt Books.

Francis King As of 2014 six of his titles have been reprinted: An Air That Kills (1948), with.

jpg Francis Henry King (4 March 19233 July 2011) was a British novelist, poet and short story writer. He worked for the British Council for 15 years, with positions in Europe and Japan Early life and Council career. In 2008 Valancourt Books, a speciality small press, began reprinting many of Francis King's works. As of 2014 six of his titles have been reprinted: An Air That Kills (1948), with a new introduction by the Author. The Dark Glasses (1954), with a new introduction by Jonathan Fryer. The Dividing Stream (1951), with a new introduction by Paul Binding.

1948) A novel by Francis King. Mark Langworthy has just returned home after a stint as a colonial administrator in India. Once a promising writer, his dreams and idealism have been extinguished, and he returns stricken with malaria and fatigued in both body and spirit.

King, Francis (Xavier) (1904-?) Contemporary British author who also . In his third novel, An Air That Kills, there is a lyricism, often negated, in the spirit of Housman's poem whence the title comes.

I believe strongly in national character, and a recurrent theme of my books is the way in which people struggle to break out of the patterns of national behavior in which they have been imprisoned since birth.

by Francis Henry King, Francis King. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. ISBN 9781934555279 (978-1-934555-27-9) Softcover, Valancourt Books, 2008. Francis Henry King at LibraryThing.

Mark Langworthy has just returned home after a stint as a colonial administrator in India. Once a promising writer, his dreams and idealism have been extinguished, and he returns stricken with malaria and fatigued in both body and spirit. When he meets his nephew, Paul, an ingenuous orphan of eighteen and an aspiring writer, Mark sees in the boy a chance for redemption. Over the course of an English summer they form a close though sometimes difficult friendship, but when Paul begins a love affair with one of his uncle's former acquaintances, Anne, things begin to unravel. A series of circumstances threatens the bond they have developed, and when Anne suggests that Mark's interest in Paul may not be what it seems, both Mark and Paul will have to come to terms with their feelings and discover the true nature of love and friendship.

Published in 1948, An Air That Kills is the third of Francis King's more than thirty novels. Widely acclaimed as one of the finest novelists of his generation, King displays in this early work all the imaginative energy and ardour of a young writer dealing with a theme which he clearly felt profoundly. This 60th anniversary edition includes a new introduction by the author.

Comments: (2)
Paxondano
Mark Langworthy is home from India on a year of sick leave due to having contracted malaria. Staying with his mother and her companion, Tilly in Scotland where the air "is marvelous" and "everyone's so healthy," Mark, although only forty-four-years of age is filled with melancholy and the feeling of defeat--his life has not amounted to what he once had hoped. He has suffered a failed attempt to attend University as a youth, a failed marriage, failed relationships with others, a failed career as a writer, perhaps a failed military career as well, and his vitality, "once an inexhaustible source" has to "be conserved with the strictest of economy." When first he meets his eighteen-year-old nephew Paul who "has some idea of being a writer," Mark finds the youth "ill-mannered" and "not worth bothering about." Later, however, Mark realizes that what he perceived as rudeness and arrogance was actually a sign that the boy suffers loneliness and "acute shyness." Mark reflects, "I knew that the paralyzing effect of shyness lasts long after one has ceased to feel shy." Once engaged to Paul's deceased mother (who married Mark's brother instead), Mark slowly begins to win over his nephew and the two begin to bond in ways that will change both of their lives.

An Air That Kills (1948) is the third novel by acclaimed British writer Francis King and it has been re-issued in a 60th Anniversary edition published by Valancourt Books with an Introduction by the author who died in 2011.

King beautifully and movingly depicts the breaking down of the barriers between Mark and Paul. Mark learns to temper his verbal reactions and frustrations and becomes more "indulgent to" Paul's "social misdemeanours" while Paul learns to begin to open up and express his feelings in an honest fashion--something he has not been able to do with adults without suffering ill consequences. Their bond quickly becomes one of mentor to mentee as Mark helps the lad with everything from his clothing to his writing and moves on to become a bond of sincere and unique friendship. In spite of their closeness (or perhaps because of it), all becomes threatened when Paul begins to form a relationship with a neighbor girl, Anne, which deprives Mark of much of the time he has been spending with Paul--time which has brought new meaning and vitality to his life.

Although Mark and Paul and their relationship is the focus of An Air That Kills, King peoples his novel with a host of well-drawn minor characters. Curiously, nearly all of them are flawed, and often unhappy individuals to some extent or another. Two different characters have physical handicaps of some sort as well as spouses who are cheating on them--and they know their spouses are cheating. A youth about the same age as Paul stutters and annoys nearly everyone with whom he comes into contact. He is totally aware of others' attitudes toward him and yet, like a desperate puppy, laps up any amount of attention he is given. A powerful publisher is mocked and scorned behind his back by his employees and others who know him for being a homosexual who preys upon and takes advantage of others. Perhaps the most negative portrayals in the novel are of a number of female characters who are depicted as self-centered, scheming, artificial, demeaning of others, and who use their sexuality for their own gain with no concern toward loyalty or who they might hurt or even destroy. The lives King depicts in An Air That Kills are not happy ones.

An Air That Kills rings true because of King's uncluttered writing and the unique lives of his characters. Equally beguiling is the irony that permeates the novel from beginning to end. One of the earliest comments in the book is about the marvelous air of Scotland, yet the novel's title refers to air that kills and the atmosphere that surrounds Mark and Paul quickly turns poisonous when they leave Scotland and take up residence in London. Their close bond becomes ruptured and endangered because of innuendo, the selfishness of others, and self-doubt. Paul discovers that a love he has spurned from a simple local girl as being ridiculous may also have been his one chance at an innocent and enduring love.

The bond that is created between Mark and Paul is heartwarmingly depicted and the wall that becomes between them that threatens to forever separate them is equally heart-wrenching.

In spite of the aura of calamity that hovers over much of An Air That Kills and the tragic-filled existence of so many of the characters, King gives readers a conclusion filled with hope and optimism that, along with the rest of King's remarkable writing makes reading An Air That Kills a rich, engaging, and ultimately very fulfilling experience.
Cenneel
Mark Langworthy, an ill, aging author, is instantly taken with his teenaged nephew Paul the moment they meet. As the two grow closer over the summer, Mark becomes a father figure, a mentor, a protector to Paul. But are there other feelings and attractions as well? Complicating the relationship is Anne, an intensely unhappy woman from Mark's past who draws Paul in. As the summer progresses, emotions intensify, leading to confrontations and revelations. Part coming of age novel as well as a study of lost youth, An Air That Kills is a powerful psychological look at the complexities of relationships, both nurturing and toxic.