carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Prospect of My Arrival

eBook The Prospect of My Arrival download

by Dwight Okita

eBook The Prospect of My Arrival download ISBN: 1460959892
Author: Dwight Okita
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 16, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 277
ePub: 1757 kb
Fb2: 1809 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf mobi doc mbr
Category: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Okita’s book reminded me of Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land. With a surefire premise and a crisp, cool writing style Dwight Okita's THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL makes for enthralling reading.

Okita’s book reminded me of Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land. Superior science fiction makes the reader think about the world that could be and the world that is si It’s been a long time since I’ve read really original science fiction. Turning the "why bring a child into this world?" question on its head, Okita asks instead "why in the world would a child want to be born here?"

Dwight Okita Well, my third book is not yet done. Prospect of My Arrival (new novel) - 1 member - last activity Mar 29, 2012 08:30PM This is a new group for anyone who wants to discuss my debut novel THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL

Dwight Okita Well, my third book is not yet done. Working title: SLUMBER PARTIES FOR GROWN UPS. In it, I explore my fascination with the bonding effects of slumbe. oreWell, my third book is not yet done. Prospect of My Arrival (new novel) - 1 member - last activity Mar 29, 2012 08:30PM This is a new group for anyone who wants to discuss my debut novel THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL. Givewaway books have been sent out. For the 946 who This is a new group for anyone who wants to discuss my debut novel THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL.

Prospect has high hopes for himself, too, but right now he's just staring out the windows of Trevor's penthouse suite, watching the steady sweep of headlights across Lake Shore Drive. He is thinking about how high it is up here on the fifty-sixth floor

Prospect has high hopes for himself, too, but right now he's just staring out the windows of Trevor's penthouse suite, watching the steady sweep of headlights across Lake Shore Drive. He is thinking about how high it is up here on the fifty-sixth floor. But a high view and a high hope are two different things.

Prospect, please don't take this the wrong way, but your phone is only to be used for emergencies. No matter what happens at the end of my three weeks-I am still glad to meet yo. There is a funny pause, and his mother purses her lips together. If you keep calling me, you won't be in the present moment. The truth is: I can help you. But it's better if I don't," she says. Being lost is a natural part of life. Did you know that the average adult spends one third of his or her life being lost?" She lets out a laugh. She is deeply tickled. I'll let the two of you get to know each other better and do your Referral business," says his father.

Hear me waxing lyrical about the humour, poignancy and depth in a unique premise handled by an expert.

My poetry book is CROSSING WITH THE LIGHT.

My first two novels are THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL and THE HOPE STORE. Working on a third called BEFORE I DISAPPEAR. My poems have been in the Norton Intro to Poetry and various textbooks. My stage plays include The Rainy Season and Richard Speck. My poetry book is CROSSING WITH THE LIGHT. I am a member of League of Extraordinary Authors. Active as a Nichiren Buddhist in the SGI for over 25 years. Active with the writers community in Chicago and nationally.

The Prospect of My Arrival by Dwight Okita. Wrecking Civilization Before Lunch by John Ring. On May 27, 2009, Bill Warrington's Last Chance by James King was announced as the winner of that year's contest. Bill Warrington's Last Chance was published by Viking, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA). Sue Grafton, New York Times-bestselling author, said about the winning entry, "This is what reading is about and what a good book is supposed to d.

Dwight Holden Okita (born August 26, 1958) is a Japanese-American novelist, poet, and playwright. His work reflects his experiences as a third-generation Japanese-American (sansei), a gay man, and a Nichiren Buddhist

Dwight Holden Okita (born August 26, 1958) is a Japanese-American novelist, poet, and playwright. His work reflects his experiences as a third-generation Japanese-American (sansei), a gay man, and a Nichiren Buddhist. He studied English literature at the University of Illinois, Chicago. His first book of poems, Crossing with the Light, was published in 1992, and nominated for Best Asian Literature Book of 1993. Sarcasm & Lemons’s books on Goodreads books)

The Prospect of My Arrival by Dwight Okita. Sarcasm & Lemons’s books on Goodreads books). My Year in Books! See what I read in. THE PROSPECT OF MY ARRIVAL (a novel by Dwight Okita) - CHAPTER 1: About My Name. Sense Of Life Undercover Connect Environment Mysterious Space Creative Interview Personalized Items.

Dwight Okita's book, a little the worse for wear. In our Spring Books Issue we heard about the nuts and bolts of Chicago's publishing industry. But hey-you don't need a publishing house to get published.

A human embryo is allowed to preview the world before deciding whether to be born.  His name is Prospect. To help him make up his mind, he will meet a range of people including a greeting card writer, a sociopath, and Prospect's inscrutable mother, among others. Trish Mesmer is the scientist charged with counseling Prospect, though she has more hidden agendas then a centipede has legs. At the same time, Trevor Grueling grows increasingly committed to derailing the bio-experiment all together. This speculative tale is served up with equal helpings of whimsy, dread, and hope.  The book is literary fiction at heart, with a somewhat sci-fi premise, so the book may not appeal to hardcore sci-fi readers. Those who appreciate the trippy, modern world on display in the movie "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" or "Being There" may find themselves at home.
Comments: (7)
Fhois
[Originally posted on Goodreads]

Prospect, the first in an experiment to determine if a pre-born human would choose to be born or not, the premise being that choosing to be born would produce happier humans. Prospect meets Referrals, people intended to give him an overview of how they see life and get along. After three weeks, there's a big press conference for Prospect to deliver his decision.

Happiness isn't all it's cracked up to be. Nor are humans. Good and bad, we have to take it all in and decide what to do about it.

The book was merely okay until the last 10-15 pages or so. The idea of the consciousness of an embryo in the womb simultaneously existing in an artificially-created body and able to react as though verging on adulthood is, frankly, loony. But, you know, wave your hands with some advanced magic tech and you can kind of ignore it. Really, don't think too hard about it because it will break your brain.

Lots of parallels in the story about choosing to take one's life or the life of another, when all we really want is to not be alone. Happiness comes in many forms, but really, is happiness the ultimate goal? 84 people killed in Nice last night -- happiness gone: do we off ourselves in retailiation because we're not happy? Yet life continues, and something deeper, more profound must be discovered as the purpose in life.

Though sad, the ending of the story makes the rest of it worth reading. Not high on my list of recommendations, but not a waste of my time.
Gavinranara
The Prospect of My Arrival by Dwight Okita certainly has a unique premise. Prospect is an embryo who, through the miracle of science and the Pre-Born Project, gets to spend three weeks inhabiting a temporary body and spending time with “referrals” (some he would be in contact with in his life – like his mother – and others that he likely would never meet but represent different types of people) so he can ultimately make the decision of whether or not he wants to be born.

The book is very engaging. It is fast-paced. The characters are all very different from each other, mostly well rounded, and interesting. It’s a fascinating look at types of people and also points out that scientific experiments that depend on human interaction are completely uncontrollable. The Prospect of My Arrival kept me reading because I really wanted to know if Prospect would choose to be born or to return to the gene pool. I cared about some of the characters. A couple things bothered me, though. The style of writing is difficult sometimes. Every so often, I really felt like there was some deep-voiced announcer in my head patronizingly explaining things to me as I read. Also, the timeline makes no sense. Prospect’s older sister was the first (and apparently only other) pre-born and at the point Prospect is choosing to be born or not, she’s an older teen and yet Trish (the facilitator) says that she conceived the pre-born project three years ago. Very confusing. These are minor, though. The book as a whole is totally worth taking the time to read it.
Auridora
I give this book three stars for its sheer inventiveness, but I cannot say it was well-written. Its style was short, choppy and abrupt, and frankly, it read like a young writer's first attempt at a novel. There were some editing issues, a few very jarring, but mostly, it lacked finesse and form.

There was no science behind the science fiction and that made it hard for me to suspend disbelief and stay in the story. The story failed to segue properly between scenes. One reviewer mentioned that it felt like a play, with scenery and dialog handed out to the actors, and I like that comparison.

There were a few times I was prepared to ditch the book, but I decided I would push through to see what happened and what Prospect's decision would be. The ending was satisfying in some regards, and while a little depressing, it felt okay. The character development was so-so - there was too much stereotyping in them and the predictability of everyone's responses and thoughts was unsatisfying. Frankly, I liked the bad guys better than the good guys because in the end, everyone was self-serving and incapable of insight. Even Prospect, who, I assume, didn't have the capacity for much insight, failed to analyze anything was much intelligence, even though computer-assisted. And little was left to the reader's imagination; everything was spelled out in naive, choppy style.

So, kudos for a clever idea and the determination to put it out there. Still and all, the writing leaves much to be desired, and I'm left feeling a tad generous with three stars.