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eBook Where the Rainbow Ends download

by Jameson Currier

eBook Where the Rainbow Ends download ISBN: 1585670847
Author: Jameson Currier
Publisher: Overlook Books (September 1, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1427 kb
Fb2: 1232 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf azw docx doc
Category: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Currier gives us an uncanny insight in to the mind of Robbie never compromising the gritty realism, this novel tells it like it is. I would recommend this novel as essential reading not just for every gay men but for anyone who has ever has been touched by AIDS or who has had to struggle against adversity.

Sexy, romantic, sad and melancholy; this book takes us on a wonderful journey as we navigate the highs and lows of Robbie, a young gay "everyman". Through his eyes we witness the sexy hedonism of the Manhattan gay scene in the late 70's, the AIDS ravaged Reagan years of the early to mid 80's and the 90's AIDS activism of LA.

Where the Rainbow Ends book. you will find all of this and more within the pages of this most treasured novel.

Jameson Currier’s most popular book is Where the Rainbow Ends.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Jameson Currier's writings have appeared in many national publications and anthologies including The Mammoth Book of Gay Erotica, Best American Gay Fiction 3, and Best Gay Erotica. He lives in New York City. Библиографические данные. Where the Rainbow Ends: A Novel. Издание: иллюстрированное.

With Where the Rainbow Ends, acclaimed short story writer and journalist Jameson Currier has written more .

With Where the Rainbow Ends, acclaimed short story writer and journalist Jameson Currier has written more than another AIDS novel. I loved this book! epic and breathtaking in scope with an easy relaxed, fluent style; this book takes you on an incredible "gay odyssey" I have never read a novel that so effectively encompasses all aspects of gay life and sensibilities. Sexy, romantic, sad and melancholy; this book takes us on a wonderful journey as we navigate the highs and lows of Robbie, a young gay "everyman".

In 1998, Currier published his debut novel Where the Rainbow Ends, about a young gay man from the South who arrives to Manhattan in the late 1970s and falls in with a group of artistic friends, who are pulled apart and bonded together by the unexpected challenges of the AIDS epidemic. The novel was a shortlisted nominee for the Lambda Literary.

This powerful, compelling, and heartfelt first novel centers on Robbie Taylor, an optimistic and romantic young man who.

I saw the movie first this time, and really liked it, so I had to read the book. What I wouldn't give to have Cecilia Ahern's talent (and, yes, money)!

I saw the movie first this time, and really liked it, so I had to read the book. What I wouldn't give to have Cecilia Ahern's talent (and, yes, money)! She is such a great writer and every novel of h. .rs that I have read has real heart. This one has an interesting format; it's an epistolary novel.

When Robbie leaves his small town life to move to New York City, he is embraced by members of the gay community who help him in his new world, yet as the 1980s approach and the AIDS epidemic surfaces, Robbie finds himself struggling with new pain and loss. Reprint.
Comments: (7)
Benn
Was turned on to this author by bookstore owner in New Orleans. First read "A wolf at the door". Didn't realize same author. His language is fluid, and storytelling is above.
After reading Where the Rainbow Ends, will continually search for other novels by Jameson Currier.
Hallolan
Another wonderful story from this author, rich with emotions, wisdom and perspective. A Heart breaking and hopeful story of a life fully lived.
Qwne
I have easily read over a thousand books, at least, in my life. Only a very few (Pat Conroy's Beach Music and The Lords of Discipline; FelicePicano's Like People in History; Susan Howatch's The Wheel of Fortune) have ever moved me to tears. Jameson Currier's debut novel, Where the Rainbow Ends (Overlook Press, $24.95) moved me to tears more than once and, simply put, is one of the best pieces of gay literature I have ever read.The book covers 1979-93, or 14 years in the life of Robbie Taylor. Robbie is a 19-year-old Georgia boy when the novels opens. He has escaped an abusive, fundamental Christian father and run away to New York to begin his life anew. Robbie is not breath-takingly beautiful, nor does he have a desire to become a model or an actor. He is acarpenter. Once in New York, he befriends Vince, an aspiring playwright who begins to expose him to gay culture and life. Their friendship soonencompasses Denise, an artist beginning to explore her own lesbian nature; Jeff, a beautiful young actor beginning an interesting spiritualquest; and Nathan, who becomes Robbie's lover just before the AIDS epidemic begins sweeping through the gay community with its devastating fury.This book is not just about the AIDS epidemic. It is about gay life and love, and the families we create to provide love and comfort in the darkdays and to celebrate the many joys. Rather than focusing on and wallowing in the heavy melodrama that the AIDS epidemic seems to produce in most writers, Currier shows both the highs and lows. The lives of these incredibly well-drawn, three-dimensional people encompass all of the emotion that is found in gay/lesbian life. The laughter is there, as well as the tears. This book is about creating a sense of family, and most of all, it is about hope.In Robbie, Currier has created a gay Everyman we can all identify with, love, and root for. This is one novel that I was sorry to see end. With this work, Currier has established himself as one of the preeminent gay novelists, not just of the 1990s, but of all time. This book should berequired reading for every gay man, period.
Gosar
I loved this book! epic and breathtaking in scope with an easy relaxed, fluent style; this book takes you on an incredible "gay odyssey" I have never read a novel that so effectively encompasses all aspects of gay life and sensibilities. Sexy, romantic, sad and melancholy; this book takes us on a wonderful journey as we navigate the highs and lows of Robbie, a young gay "everyman". Through his eyes we witness the sexy hedonism of the Manhattan gay scene in the late 70's, the AIDS ravaged Reagan years of the early to mid 80's and the 90's AIDS activism of LA. Effectively incorporating historical fact with fiction, Currier has painted a fascinating portrait of Robbie and his four friends; their loves, losses, achievements and disappointments. Thematically there are many, many important issues relating to gay life and the homosexual identity being addressed here: questions of faith, religion, and spirituality and whether these can apply to a modern gay man. The importance of family; Currier raises the essential question, What constitutes a family? Is family by blood or is true family friendship? Issues regarding contemporary sexual politics are also discussed particularly the politics of AIDS activism and the attitudes that big business and government had towards the disease in the late 80's and early 90's. This is a beautiful, eloquent, sexy and at times a disturbing chronicle of the ravages of AIDS and the impact that the disease has had on a whole generation od gay men. Currier gives us an uncanny insight in to the mind of Robbie never compromising the gritty realism, this novel tells it like it is. I would recommend this novel as essential reading not just for every gay men but for anyone who has ever has been touched by AIDS or who has had to struggle against adversity.
Michael Leonard
Gholbirius
Currier is an accomplished short story writer, and it shows in this first novel; the reader repeatedly has a sense of closure, only to experience delighted relief that this is indeed long fiction and the more is to come. Packed with the stuff of life, this rewarding work might be termed a "gay immigrant" novel, a saga about men and women who leave their hometown and families, move to the big cities, and fashion new lives in an alien land. Currier (Dancing on the Moon: Short Stories About AIDS, Viking, 1993) takes his characters from the late 1960s, through the hedonistic 1970s, and into the AIDS-riddled 1980s and politically charged 1990s. Their stores are ones of profound loss -- of biological families, of friends, and of intimate relationships. It's little wonder that Currier draws clear parallels to the story of Job -- the underlying question is one of faith that, on the other side of pain, there is meaning after all. Recommended for public and academic libraries. Roger W. Durbin, University of Akron Library, Ohio Library Journal. October 15, 1998