carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » The Airway to Everywhere: A History of All American Aviation, 1937-1953

eBook The Airway to Everywhere: A History of All American Aviation, 1937-1953 download

by Walter David Lewis,William F. Trimble

eBook The Airway to Everywhere: A History of All American Aviation, 1937-1953 download ISBN: 0822935791
Author: Walter David Lewis,William F. Trimble
Publisher: Univ of Pittsburgh Pr; n edition (April 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1538 kb
Fb2: 1115 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw lit rtf lrf
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Transportation

This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer

This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer. The brainchild of self-styled inventor Dr. Lytle S. Adams and Richard C. du Pont, the company began as an airmail delivery carrier, taking advantage of the Experimental Air Mail Act passed by Congress in 1938. The Airway to Everywhere relates the exciting early days of airmail g tales of courageous pilots who scooped mail bags tethered to wires strung between poles on makeshift airfields.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on November 25, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

David Lewis and William F. Trimble, "The airway to everywhere: a history of All American Aviation, 1937-1953" University of Pittsburgh Press, 1988. Brian Butko, Paul Roberts, William F. Trimble. Pittsburgh history" Winter, 1993/94. Bettis: the field that brought airmail to Pittsburgh", Clairton, Pennsylvania: The Progress, July 1976.

Similar books and articles. William A. Tuccio, David A. Esser, Gillian Driscoll, Ian R. McAndrew & MaryJo O. Smith - 2016 - Pragmatics and Society 7 (1):30-56. The Airway to Everywhere: A History of All American Aviation, 1937-1953 by W. David Lewis; William F. William Leary - 1989 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 80:557-558. The Eagle Aloft: Two Centuries of the Balloon in America by Tom D. Crouch. The American Hegelians: An Intellectual Episode in the History of Western America," Ed. William H. Goetzmann.

The Airway to Everywhere book. This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer. The Airway to Everywhere relates the exciting early dayThe This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer.

This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline .

This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer.

Lewis, W. David (Walter David), 1931 . Trimble, William . 1947-. Note: Pittsburgh: University of Pittburgh Press; London: Feffer and Simons, c1988. David (Walter David), 1931-. Author: Trimble, William . Subject: All American Aviation (Firm) - History. Subject: Airlines - United States - History. In that vein, All American Aviation would become Allegheny Airlines, and later, . Air. Máis información.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

David and TrimbleWilliam . Pittsburgh, P. University of Pittsburgh Press, 1988. ix + 230 pp. Illustrations, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index.

David and TrimbleWilliam . Got it. We value your privacy.

This book chronicles the history of All American Aviation of western Pennsylvania, a commercial airline pioneer. The brainchild of self-styled inventor Dr. Lytle S. Adams and Richard C. du Pont, the company began as an airmail delivery carrier, taking advantage of the Experimental Air Mail Act passed by Congress in 1938. The Airway to Everywhere relates the exciting early days of airmail deliveryâ?”hair-raising tales of courageous pilots who scooped mail bags tethered to wires strung between poles on makeshift airfields. The story of this airline is placed within the context a typical twentieth-century American business pattern-where technological innovation is followed by development and commercial application, followed by government subsidies and corporate takeovers. In that vein, All American Aviation would become Allegheny Airlines, and later, U.S. Air.
Comments: (3)
Fenritaur
I was most interested in All American as someone whose military unit once used the Fulton surface to air extraction system, which built upon some work AA had done.

Lewis's book is an academic history with a bit of the dry and musty smell of a dissertation shaped up for publication -- no idea if that's what it is, but it's definitely an academic work. And the underlying subject matter and the characters involved make the material fascinating no matter how it is presented.
Endieyab
This talks about my fathers airport in the 1930-40's at Natrona Heights, Pa. Always looking for that history about him and his partners at that time. Book was recommended by a Natrona Heights, Pa. historian. Thanks to all.
Yanthyr
Lytle S. Adams, a descendant of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, clearly saw that smaller communiities were at a substantial disadvantage in the emerging field of airmail. The process of landing and take-off of airplanes was so time-consuming that it limited the number of stops an airplane could make to the larger communities with larger airports.

So he developed a plan to solve the problem, a problem which was similar to the difficulty of bringing electricity to rural areas (solved by the Rural Electric Administration and the cooperatives it spawned), bringing transportation to rural areas (solved by the U.S. Interstate Highway network), bringing television to rural areas (solved by the laying of cable to them).

His plan involved tecnnical ingenuity: the development of a device to hook on to an overhead cable where containers of mail would be be placed, so that mail could be picked up on regularly defined roots without a plane taking the trouble to land to take-off.

His idea gained political backing in the Roosevelt Administration and from the New Deal Democrats in Congress, because it fit in with their strategies to integrate isolated communities into the mainstream of American life. Through Roosevelt's daughter who had married into the DuPont family, he met Richard C. DuPont, an aviation enthusiast, who had the money and the skill to develop Adams' idea into a functioning company called All American Aviation.

The Adams-DuPont relationship had tragic personal overtones, although it was extremely productive in the long run. DuPont did not give Adams the financial rewards he hoped for,added insult to injury by reworking Adams' technology to make it more effective, and ultimately bought him out as the relationship became increasingly bitter and mutually distrustful.

And DuPont's dynamic corporate leadership--he had become head of the corporation at the age of 28-- led him to be offered to take over the U.S. Army's glider program as a special assistant to Army Air Forces Chief Henry H. "Hap" Arnold.

In this position, DuPont was testing one of the new motorless airships, when the craft fell into a spin, his parachute malfunctioned, and he fell to his death at the age of 33.

During World War II, the company's no-landing pickup system hit its peak in utilization, but it failed to make money and relied on governmental subsidies. After World War II, it faced the additional problem of steadily improving highways, which allowed mail to be picked up faster and cheaper without the no-landing pickup system.

With its back to the wall, All-American Aviation was offered a chance to become a passenger airline serving new or under-utilized routes. It leaped at this chance for financial salvation, and evolved over time into Alleheny Airlines and then U.S. Air.

The strengths of this book are many: detailed explanations of technology and technological changes, clear explanations of business strategy and the regulatory system, and concise explanations of both the internal politics of the company and the politics of Congress and the executive branch. This book is a great introduction to the field of airline regulation, a valuable addition to anyone's understanding of Pennsylvania business history, and a compelling case study of the importance and the limits of technological innovation.

The concise nature of the book--and its technological orientation--means that some intriguing political angles go uncovered. The irony of a descendant of rivals of two of 19th Century America's leading Democrats--party founder Thomas Jefferson and and party definer Andrew Jackson--relying on New Deal regulation and Democratic Party allies to start his business goes unmentioned. And the political analysis of the company's large base of Congressional support is matter of fact and unquestioning of motives and rationales.

Virtually no one who reads this book will ever look at the history of American air travel the same way again. This book is an inspiring example for those who seek to solve societal problems through business, and those who seek to grow new businesses from scratch. It offers a clear warning of the dangers--as well as the opportunities--posed by the search for venture capital.