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eBook Dreadnought, a history of the modern battleship, download

by Richard Alexander Hough

eBook Dreadnought, a history of the modern battleship, download ISBN: 0043590047
Author: Richard Alexander Hough
Publisher: Allen & Unwin; 2nd edition (1968)
Language: English
Pages: 268
ePub: 1843 kb
Fb2: 1214 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: doc docx txt mobi
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Transportation

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Dreadnought: A History of the Modern Battleship as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Hough, Richard, 1922-1999. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Richard Alexander Hough (pronounced how; 15 May 1922 – 7 October 1999) was a British author and historian specializing in maritime history. Hough married the author Charlotte Woodyatt, who he had met when they were pupils at Frensham Heights School, and they had five children including the author Deborah Moggach, the children's author Sarah Garland, and Alexandra Hough, author of the textbook, Hough’s Cardio Respiratory Care. Hough won the Daily Express Best Book of the Sea Award in 1972.

Richard Hough's "Dreadnought" is a definitive history of the dreadnought battleship from the design & construction of HMS DREADNOUGHT through to the battleships constructed and designed at the end of WWII. The book is a great read and details the impact of the namesake ship on the navies of the world and the arms race it initiated; culminating in WWI. This book is a good companion to the other "DREADNOUGHT" by historian Robert Massie; focused on that impact that the ship had on the path to WWI. Get them both.

The battleship era began with the launch of HMS Dreadnought in 1906 and ended when air power became the .

The battleship era began with the launch of HMS Dreadnought in 1906 and ended when air power became the dominant force. Many battleships remain household names and the losses of the Hood, Bismarck, Yamato and Arizona still echo through the decades because of their fascinating stories. Categories: History\Military History. Издательство: Periscope Publishing.

It is an irritation in a pretty standard description of this widely studied ship class.

Categories: Military Engineering. Dreadnought History of Mod Battle. By (author) Richard Alexander Hough, By (author) RH VALUE PUBLISHING.

The history of the First World War is dominated by the monumental battles of Northern France But the Great War was fought at sea as well as on land. And it witnessed the greatest naval battle of all time. The narrative follows the race to war, including the construction of the Dreadnought, the biggest, fastest, most heavily gunned battleship in the world; and against the backdrop of feuds, scheming, and personality clashes at the Admiralty, examines the triumphs and tragedies of the great battles and campaigns. Could the appalling losses have been avoided during the Dardanelles?

Published: New York, Macmillan.

Richard Alexander Hough (pronounced how; 15 May 1922 – 7 October 1999) was a British author and . Dreadnought: a History of the Modern Battleship. First Sea Lord: a life of Admiral Lord Fisher

Richard Alexander Hough (pronounced how; 15 May 1922 – 7 October 1999) was a British author and historian specializing in maritime history. The Daily Express is a daily national middle-market tabloid newspaper in the United Kingdom. It is the flagship of Express Newspapers, a subsidiary of Northern & Shell. First Sea Lord: a life of Admiral Lord Fisher. The Hunting of Force Z.

Comments: (2)
Umge
This book was first published in 1964 and unless it has been updated, it is very inaccurate and misleading. Mr. Hough divides the categories of battleships into three generations of dreadnoughts, first (Dreadnought, herself), second (Queen Elizabeth class, and third, the German pocket battleships onwards. This in itself is not misleading but he depends on old volumes of Janes Fighting Ships for individual class data and the line drawings found at the end of the book. Janes Fighting Ships was known to include data provided by different Navy Admiralties and this information was often deliberately inaccurate. Hough credits the Italian Littorio class with a speed of 35 knots when their sea speed was actually about 28 knots. The appendix with line drawings in the back credits the American Iowa class with 19 inch belt armor when they actually had inclined plates of 12.2 inches. Hough pursues the history of the dreadnought battleship from the building of HMS Dreadnought in 1906, to the British/German naval arms race prior to WWI, the events of WWI, the postwar naval building competition leading to the Washington Naval Conference of 1922 and the resulting modifications to existing ships as new construction was prohibited. He then proceeds to begin discussion of the last types of fast battleships, including the French Dunkerque, Richelieu, the British King George V, the US North Carolina and South Dakota, the Italian Littorio and German Bismarck. Finally, he describes the US Iowa class and the Japanese Yamato class. He states that there was no record of the Yamato ever having fired a full broadside due to concussive effects. Where he got that information I will never know. Yamato could and did fire full nine gun broadsides with no structural problems. In sum, this book is good for a high school student but the errors contained make it more than useless for the serious naval historian or warship enthusiast.
Coiril
I bought this book in 1968 and have re-read it several times. While it may lack the technical details of other studies on battleships it is an excellent overview of the battleship. It is an easy read, well illustrated, and interesting. If Mr. Hough would add a chapter that discusses the upgrades and deployment of the Iowa class battleships during the Gulf War I would by the book in a minute. I will admit I am no scholar of naval history or ship design, but I did and still do like this book. Fred Gage, Citrus Heights, CA