carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Terrain Analysis and Distributed Modelling in Hydrology (Advances in Hydrological Processes)

eBook Terrain Analysis and Distributed Modelling in Hydrology (Advances in Hydrological Processes) download

by K. J. Beven,I. D. Moore

eBook Terrain Analysis and Distributed Modelling in Hydrology (Advances in Hydrological Processes) download ISBN: 0471938866
Author: K. J. Beven,I. D. Moore
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (February 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1837 kb
Fb2: 1420 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw docx lrf doc
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Start by marking Terrain Analysis and Distributed Modelling in Hydrology as Want to Read .

Start by marking Terrain Analysis and Distributed Modelling in Hydrology as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. New techniques involving simulation visualization software and workstation computer power are considered.

Spatial hydrologic modeling; GIS-based hydrology; Hydrogeology; Hydrology Distributed hydrologic modeling within a GIS framework is the use of parameter maps derived . Hydrologic modeling and GIS. In: Goodchild, .

Spatial hydrologic modeling; GIS-based hydrology; Hydrogeology; Hydrology Distributed hydrologic modeling within a GIS framework is the use of parameter maps derived from geospatial data to simulate. Johnston, . Maidment, . GIS World Books, Fort Collins, CO (1996)Google Scholar.

This book is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an overview of hydrology and the hydrologic cycle, along . The final chapter highlights the importance of information analysis and decision making in hydrological work.

This book is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an overview of hydrology and the hydrologic cycle, along with the world's water resources and their utilization and management. Subsequent chapters deal with atmospheric thermodynamics and atmospheric circulation; analysis and measurement of precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, and interception; infiltration of groundwater; and reservoir and stream routing.

Hydrological Processes is an international journal devoted to the publication of original scientific and technical papers in hydrology. The objective of these communications is to improve our understanding of hydrological processes.

Based on requirement of distributed hydrological modelling and considering the real conditions of the arid and semi-arid regions in China, this paper develops a Distributed Time Variant Gain Model (DTVGM) by coupling th. .

Based on requirement of distributed hydrological modelling and considering the real conditions of the arid and semi-arid regions in China, this paper develops a Distributed Time Variant Gain Model (DTVGM) by coupling the mechanism and special digit information of water cycle with hydrologic system approach. DTVGM includes two components: one is runoff generation process on grid elements; the other is flow routing process based on ranked grids. At present, the runoff generation process is divided into two layers in the vertical direction: the upper layer is the surface flow; the lower layer is the subsurface flow.

Morphometric Analysis and Hydrological Inference for Water Resource . Terrain analysis and distributed modelling in hydrology. Keith J. Beven, I. D. Moore. McGraw-Hill Book Co, Singapore.

Morphometric Analysis and Hydrological Inference for Water Resource Management in Atrai-Sib River Basin, NW Bangladesh Using Remote Sensing and GIS Technique. Chow ., D. R. Maidment, L. W. Mays.

Terrain analysis based on digital elevation models is being increasingly used in hydrology (. Wilson and Gallant, 2000). Model elements in hydrologic and water quality models are sometimes delineated based on area draining directly to a channel segment with hillslope or overland flow length a parameter used to quantify for example hydrologic response time or erosion and sediment delivery (. hillslope length in the USLE methodology Wischmeyer and Smith, 1978).

This paper describes methods that use digital elevation models (DEMs) in hydrology, implemented as an ArcGIS . The Prediction of Hillslope Flow Paths for Distributed Hydrological Modeling Using Digital Terrain Models, P. Quinn, K. Beven, P. Chevallier, O. Planchon.

This paper describes methods that use digital elevation models (DEMs) in hydrology, implemented as an ArcGIS toolbar using Visual Basic and the ESRI object library. I describe generalized channel network delineation to objectively estimate drainage density and by using terrain curvature accommodate spatially variable drainage density. Hydrological Processes, 1991.

The color indicates confidence in model result using the signal to noise ratio (SNRm) for all considered sources of uncertainty: SNRm 1 (green); 0m<1 (orange); SNRm<0 (red).

3 Modeling Hydrological Processes in Arid Mountainous Regions – State of the Art. 5. Hydrological Model of the Upper Drâa Catchment. The Conceptual Model. The color indicates confidence in model result using the signal to noise ratio (SNRm) for all considered sources of uncertainty: SNRm 1 (green); 0m<1 (orange); SNRm<0 (red).

ABSTRACT Physically based, distributed hydrologic models often claim to be transferable because they represent the explicit physics governing water movement and storage

ABSTRACT Physically based, distributed hydrologic models often claim to be transferable because they represent the explicit physics governing water movement and storage. However, at some point, most models eventually make assumptions about which processes are important to represent accurately and which processes can be represented with shortcuts towards the goal of model efficiency. When shortcuts creep in, physically based models take steps towards becoming conceptual models

Leading authorities present the latest advances and anticipate future research directions in this rapidly growing field. New techniques involving simulation visualization software and workstation computer power are considered. Features concepts regarding direct application of newly obtained data and the use of derived indices to assess hydrological, geomorphological and ecological potentials or risk.