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eBook Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment: Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi Ports and Coasts download

by Stephen A. Curtis

eBook Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment: Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi Ports and Coasts download ISBN: 0784409315
Author: Stephen A. Curtis
Publisher: Amer Society of Civil Engineers (June 30, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 133
ePub: 1554 kb
Fb2: 1534 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt docx mobi doc
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Hurricane Katrina's winds and storm surge reached the Mississippi coastline on the morning of August 29, 2005. beginning a two-day path of destruction through central Mississippi; by 10 .

Hurricane Katrina's winds and storm surge reached the Mississippi coastline on the morning of August 29, 2005. CDT on August 29, 2005, the eye of Katrina began traveling up the entire state, only slowing from hurricane-force winds at Meridian near 7 . and entering Tennessee as a tropical storm. Many coastal towns of Mississippi (and Louisiana) had already been obliterated, in a single night.

'Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment'' brings together the results of a comprehensive evaluation led by ASCE's Coasts, Oceans, Ports, and Rivers Institute (COPRI). This committee report assesses the geographical impact of the hurricane upon coastal, port, harbor, and marine infrastructure, including levees.

Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hurricane Katrina Damage Assessment: Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi Ports and Coasts as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hurricane Katrina disaster relief. Frederic P. Miller, Agnes F. Vandome, John McBrewster. The disaster recovery response to Hurricane Katrina in. т 1660. The Good Pirates Of The Forgotten Bayous – Fighting to Save a Way of Life in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina. 2, 2005, New Orl. т 2688. Natural Disasters and Public Health – Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma.

Dozens of bridges and thousands of residential structures were damaged as a result of Hurricane Katrina

Dozens of bridges and thousands of residential structures were damaged as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Florida is one of the most storm-prone states in the United States, which. experienced several hurricanes such as Andrew, George, Earl, Opal, and Ivan in the last twenty years.

Hurricane Katrina was the costliest storm in . Adding to the destruction following Hurricane Katrina, fires burn in parts of New Orleans in an apocalyptic scene from early on September 3, 2005. history, and its effects are still felt today in New Orleans and coastal Louisiana. The storm struck the Gulf Coast with devastating force at daybreak on Aug. 29, 2005, pummeling a region that included New Orleans and neighboring Mississippi. Photograph by Vincent Laforet, The New York Times/Redux. Hurricane Katrina, explained.

Curtis SA (ed) (2007) Hurricane Katrina damage assessment: Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi ports and coasts, vol 3. American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, pp 98–101Google Scholar. Daly EM (2006) New Orleans, invisible city. Nat Cult 1(2)(Autumn):133–148, 135Google Scholar. Cite this chapter as: Hughes . 2012) New Orleans: An Environmental History of Disaster. In: Mendonca . Cunha . Chakrabarti R. (eds) Natural Resources, Sustainability and Humanity.

Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that made landfall on Florida and Louisiana in August 2005, causing catastrophic damage, particularly in the city of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, and over 1,200 deaths. Subsequent flooding, caused largely as a result of fatal engineering flaws in the flood protection system known as levees around the city of New Orleans, precipitated most of the loss of lives.

Hurricane Katrina, at one point a Category Five storm, caused millions of dollars in damage and left a death toll .

Hurricane Katrina, at one point a Category Five storm, caused millions of dollars in damage and left a death toll in the thousands. It was downgraded to a tropical storm about six hours later just northwest of Meridian, Mississippi, and became an extratropical low on Aug. 31. It was finally absorbed by a frontal zone later that day over the eastern Great Lakes, according to the NOAA. The flooding in New Orleans nearly a week after Hurricane Katrina hit, taken by NASA's EO-1 satellite on Sept.

This report assessing the damage to coastal, ports, harbors, and marine infrastructure, as well as the protection levees in New Orleans, resulting from the infamous 2005 hurricane was produced by the Ports, Harbors, and Marine Team of the Coasts, Oceans, Ports, and Rivers Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers. The report characterizes itself as a "broad brush overview" of damage along the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coast and to river and coastal ports in Louisiana. Aside from damage assessment, it also considers lessons learned regarding storm surge and wave action, wind forces, and engineering issues and policies. Some half or more of the volume consists of black and white photographs of hurricane damage. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)