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eBook Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation: Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation Berlin 1984, January 15–20 (Dahlem Workshop Report) download

by K.C. Marshall,W.G. Characklis,Z. Filip,MADILYN FLETCHER,P. Hirsch,G.W. Jones,R. Mitchell,B.A. Pethica,A.H. Rose,G.B. Calleja,J.A. Breznak,G.A. McFeters,P.R. Rutter

eBook Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation: Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation Berlin 1984, January 15–20 (Dahlem Workshop Report) download ISBN: 3540139966
Author: K.C. Marshall,W.G. Characklis,Z. Filip,MADILYN FLETCHER,P. Hirsch,G.W. Jones,R. Mitchell,B.A. Pethica,A.H. Rose,G.B. Calleja,J.A. Breznak,G.A. McFeters,P.R. Rutter
Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (January 24, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 426
ePub: 1253 kb
Fb2: 1717 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: docx mbr lrf lrf
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Filip, . FLETCHER, . Hirsch, . Jones, . Physiology of Cell Aggregation: Flocculation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae As a Model System.

Filip, . Mitchell, . Pethica, .

Breznak (Assistant), . McFeters (Assistant), . Rutter (Assistant) & 10 more.

Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation Berlin 1984, January 15–20. Aggregation Copolymer adhesion bacteria biofilm chemistry microbial ecology microorganism polymer structure surfaces. Bibliographic information. Conference proceedings. Activity on Surfaces. J. A. Breznak, K. E. Cooksey, W. Hamilton, F. W. Eckhardt, T. Hattori, Z. Filip et al. Pages 202-221. Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.

Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation book. usage of the terms substrate and substratum. Start by marking Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation: Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation Berlin 1984, January 15 20 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A. C. Marshall, G. McFeters. A substrate (p. substrates) is a material utilized by microorganisms, generally as a source of energy. A substratum (p. substrata) is asolid surface to which a microorganism mayattach. REFERENCES (1) Marshall, . Interfaces in Microbial Ecology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. The effect of solid surfaces upon bacterial activity.

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report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation, Berlin 1984, January 15-20. Held and published on behalf of the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft.

report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation, Berlin 1984, January 15-20 Published 1984 by Springer-Verlag in Berlin. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation: Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and . The curing process of the gluing formulation occurs in the course of time both in the bulk and on the substrate surface.

Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation: Report of the Dahlem Workshop on Microbial Adhesion and Aggregation Berlin 1984, January 15–20.

The adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces is influenced by long-range, short-range, and hydrodynamic forces. INTRODUCTION Any discussion of the physical chemistry of microbial adhesion is complicated by the nature of the particles and substrata concerned. In the study of particle adhesion using well-defined, nonliving systems, long-range forces are adequately described by DLVO theory (due to Derjaguin and Landau, and Verwey and Overbeek), and hydrodynamic forces can be controlled. Microorganisms are far from being "ideal" particles: they have neither a simple geometry, nor a simple, uniform molecular composition.