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eBook Up North: Where Canada's Architecture Meets the Land download

by Lisa Rochon

eBook Up North: Where Canada's Architecture Meets the Land download ISBN: 1552636909
Author: Lisa Rochon
Publisher: Key Porter Books (August 10, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1541 kb
Fb2: 1106 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt lit docx mobi
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Up North: Where Canada's. has been added to your Cart. LISA ROCHON is the architecture critic for The Globe and Mail.

Up North: Where Canada's. She holds a master’s degree in Urban Design from the University of Toronto, as well as a Certificat d’Etudes Politiques from L’Institut d’Etudes Politiques in Paris. Since 1997, she has been an adjunct professor in the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. She lives with her husband and four children in Toronto, Ontario.

Last fall, architecture critic Lisa Rochon released her much-anticipated book Up North: where Canada’s architecture meets the land

Last fall, architecture critic Lisa Rochon released her much-anticipated book Up North: where Canada’s architecture meets the land. In a recent interview, Rochon discussed some of her ideas behind the essays and interviews that identify and examine our relationship with the landscape and the buildings we construct and inhabit.

Up North: Where Canada's Architecture Meets the Land, Lisa Rochon's treatise on Canadian architecture, and . The best of Canadian architecture often seems deceptively modest, yet it is confident and self-possessed, it is ambitious yet unpretentious, it is thoughtful yet uncontrived

Up North: Where Canada's Architecture Meets the Land, Lisa Rochon's treatise on Canadian architecture, and Substance Over Spectacle, Andrew Gruft's exhibition and accompanying book, both attempt to define and raise the profile of our country's highest-calibre architecture. The best Canadian architecture, writes Gruft, is distinguished by its "resistance to the spectacular and pursuit of a more balanced approached. The best of Canadian architecture often seems deceptively modest, yet it is confident and self-possessed, it is ambitious yet unpretentious, it is thoughtful yet uncontrived. If all that sounds like a matchmaker's spin on a boring blind date, so be it.

Up North, where Canada's architecture meets the land. The Silton Chapel was featured in Lisa Rochon's publication of Up North. She described it as . .among the most primeval works of land architecture in the country. Our Lady of the Lake Chapel at Silton, Saskatchewan. August 2004 ·. · Character and Controversy Exhibition, Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon. The exhibition explored modernist architecture in Saskatchewan. The Silton Chapel was described as having a sublime connection to the prairie landscape.

Up North: Where Canada’s Architecture Meets the Land" by Lisa Rochon (Au. Masters of Architecture Series: "Barton Myers Selected and Current Works" by Barton Myers and Stephen Dobney, Images Publishing Group.

Up North: Where Canada’s Architecture Meets the Land" by Lisa Rochon (Aug. 2004), Key Porter Books, pp. 139, 145-146, 148, 168, 215-216, 239, 253, 254-255. Brave New Houses; Adventures in California Living" by Michael Webb (2003), Rizzoli, New York, pp 156–163.

The legacy of Canadian architecture grows out of the landscape, a landscape that. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The legacy of Canadian architecture grows out of the landscape, a landscape that is mythic in its scale and power.

3. Description this book The legacy of Canadian architecture grows out of the landscape, a landscape that is mythic in its scale and power. Up north, architecture rarely competes with the awe- inspiring forces of nature. com/o59mf7n if you want to download this book OR. Recommended.

Lisa Rochon, Toronto architectural critic and design strategist, notes this most recent period is defined by greater confidence and delight in architectural expression with more attention paid to human scale and the beautiful use of materials. Right up until the 1990s, many heritage buildings were torn down in Toronto, but Rochon believes that the city has entered a new phase where City Hall, residents and developers generally agree on the importance of introducing new buildings while at the same time preserving quality heritage architecture to enhance public spaces where possible.

The legacy of Canadian architecture grows out of the landscape, a landscape that is mythic in its scale and power. Up north, architecture rarely competes with the awe-inspiring forces of nature. It digs into the side of a hill or a mountain, or it rises up to match the temper of the land. In Canada, there is an unabashed intimacy between architecture and landscape.How do award-winning Canadian architects continue to distinguish themselves in the world`s hyper-market of design? By doing what theyve been doing since the 1940s: making meaningful, authentic sense of modernism. The award-winning architecture that Canadians are producing today is not a concoction brewed up to suit the globalized aesthetic of design. It belongs to a legacy of intelligence in architecture that began on the West Coast: human-scaled, finely crafted architecture that heightened the sense of place. Over the past several decades, the best Canadian architects have developed a modern design language that never abandoned a strong sense of place. Original analysis and insights are drawn from the author`s extensive experience as the national architecture critic and her in-depth interviews with the gurus of Canadian architecture: Frank Gehry, Eberhard Zeidler, Raymond Moriyama, as well as the younger superstars such as Bruce Kuwabara, the Patkaus and Shim-Sutcliffe Architects.