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eBook A World of Rivers: Environmental Change on Ten of the World's Great Rivers download

by Ellen Wohl

eBook A World of Rivers: Environmental Change on Ten of the World's Great Rivers download ISBN: 0226904784
Author: Ellen Wohl
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (November 30, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 368
ePub: 1510 kb
Fb2: 1510 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: rtf doc lrf mobi
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Ellen Wohl's A World of Rivers gives a fantastic and in depth introduction to understanding the world's greatest rivers and the effects of human interactions with them

Ellen Wohl's A World of Rivers gives a fantastic and in depth introduction to understanding the world's greatest rivers and the effects of human interactions with them.

A World of Rivers book. That rivers are complex ecosystems is something I always knew, but the world of complexity in rivers really comes to life with this book. I like her method of using the journey of a drop of water across the world. We, like rivers, are all connected.

A World of Rivers explores the confluence of human and environmental change on ten of the great rivers of the world. Ranging from the Murray-Darling in Australia and the Yellow River in China to Central Europe’s Danube and the United States’ Mississippi, the book journeys down the most important rivers in all corners of the globe. Wohl shows us how pollution, such as in the Ganges and in the Ob of Siberia, has affected biodiversity in the water. But rivers are also resilient, and Wohl stresses the importance of conservation and restoration to help reverse the effects of human carelessness and.

A World of Rivers explores the confluence of human and environmental . Now this is a brilliant book She brings out so many fascinating aspects of rivers that I found this to be . . Now this is a brilliant book. The style is lucid, and Ellen really manages to bring the rivers to life. She brings out so many fascinating aspects of rivers that I found this to be a book that is both enjoyable, and one that can be used as a reference.

By Ellen Wohl She has chosen to examine ten of the world’s major river systems to learn how they are bearing up under th.

The author, a professor of geosciences, is distinctly more objective and even hopeful than many of her environmentalist contemporaries would be in her approach to this wide-ranging subject. She has chosen to examine ten of the world’s major river systems to learn how they are bearing up under the onslaught of human development. All have been assaulted in various ways and degrees by humans.

Far from being the serene, natural streams of yore, modern rivers have been diverted, dammed, dumped in, and dried up, all in efforts to harness their power for human needs. But these rivers have also undergone environmental change.

This listing is for A World of Rivers : Environmental Change on Ten of the World's Great Rivers by Ellen Wohl (2010, Hardcover) : Ellen Wohl (2010) I. This listing is for A World of Rivers : Environmental Change on Ten of the World's Great Rivers by Ellen Wohl (2010, Hardcover) : Ellen Wohl (2010) ISBN 9780226904788: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780226007601. Release Date:November 2012.

This book explores the confluence of human and environmental change on ten of the great rivers of the world. Ranging from the Murray-Darling in Australia and the Yellow River in China to Central Europe's Danube and the Mississippi, the book journeys down the most important rivers in all corners of the globe.

Far from being the serene, natural streams of yore, modern rivers have been diverted, dammed, dumped in, and dried up, all in efforts to harness their power for human needs. But these rivers have also undergone environmental change. The old adage says you can’t step in the same river twice, and Ellen Wohl would agree—natural and synthetic change are so rapid on the world’s great waterways that rivers are transforming and disappearing right before our eyes.

            A World of Rivers explores the confluence of human and environmental change on ten of the great rivers of the world. Ranging from the Murray-Darling in Australia and the Yellow River in China to Central Europe’s Danube and the United States’ Mississippi, the book journeys down the most important rivers in all corners of the globe. Wohl shows us how pollution, such as in the Ganges and in the Ob of Siberia, has affected biodiversity in the water. But rivers are also resilient, and Wohl stresses the importance of conservation and restoration to help reverse the effects of human carelessness and hubris.

            What all these diverse rivers share is a critical role in shaping surrounding landscapes and biological communities, and Wohl’s book ultimately makes a strong case for the need to steward positive change in the world’s great rivers.

Comments: (5)
Ganthisc
Now this is a brilliant book. The style is lucid, and Ellen really manages to bring the rivers to life. She brings out so many fascinating aspects of rivers that I found this to be a book that is both enjoyable, and one that can be used as a reference.

That rivers are complex ecosystems is something I always knew, but the world of complexity in rivers really comes to life with this book.

I like her method of using the journey of a drop of water across the world. We, like rivers, are all connected.

Brilliant. I am waiting for an updated edition!
AnnyMars
I am very impressed by the depth and "readability" of Wohl's book. She covers a huge amount of information, presents excellent data backed by observation, anecdote, and research, and gives the reader a solid journey through the most important and troubled water systems of our world.

As another reviewer wrote, the only possible issue I could take with the book is the lack of discussion of the cultural backgrounds of the peoples and places along the rivers in question and how those relate to the story of the river's health - or lack thereof. But, to her credit, Wohl makes it clear that she is not going into this subject matter, but rather looking at the rivers from a factual human impact and environmental standpoint.

Short story: this is a great book, at times troubling, and gives the reader insight into the challenges facing the world's most important rivers.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Wohl uses the writerly device of the migrations of a drop of water through these systems. I don't think it works particularly well, although it does make the point that world rivers are part of a vast system of water flows over and under and through the land.

She has useful detail on river dynamics and rivers in a general sense. The strength of the book is the detail on each river, allowing a sort of compare and contrast of the past and the present situation of each. The ten rivers are by no means all of the most important, but exemplify all the others. Each has things unique to its history--the Ob faces pollution from nuclear waste from the former Soviet Union's weapons programs, the Ganges features a reverential kind of pollution from cremations on its banks, the Mississippi has been altered almost beyond recognition by the Army Corps of Engineers. The context and situation of each river would be a book to itself, but Wohl manages to provide significant context and does it readably. The environmental changes she describes include in particular, dams.

I found the chapters on the Amazon and the Congo to be the most interesting, because of my interest in Brazil and the Congo. Other readers may differ. Rivers worldwide are worth finding out about, particularly as water becomes scarce. Future conflicts are likely to emerge over the Nile (between Egypt and Ethiopia), the Tigris and Euphrates (Turkey and Iraq), the Colorado (USA and Mexico) and Chinese interest in Siberian waters. Her book covers only ten of many important rivers, but it is a very good start for anyone interested in rivers. Look at a map and see which major rivers in Southeast Asia originate in China, and you'll see why rivers may be sources of conflict.
Ttyr
Ellen Wohl's A World of Rivers gives a fantastic and in depth introduction to understanding the world's greatest rivers and the effects of human interactions with them. She divides the book into twelve chapters and covers the ten greatest rivers in the world: The Amazon, The Ob, The Nile, The Danube, The Ganges, The Mississippi, The Murray-Darling, The Congo, The Chang Jiang, and The Mackenzie. There is also an introductory and conclusive chapter that both illustrates the importance of these rivers and gives an easy-to-read style that explains the contents of the book very succinctly. She also separates the chapters by inserting a creative interlude taking an artistic form. They all tell the epic journey a water droplet takes to get from the mouth of the Amazon to the Atlantic ocean or from the mouth of the Nile to the Mediterranean Sea, etc. Ellen Wohl's book is a fun and informative read, letting the reader know just how much to know in order to have a basic understanding of the world's great rivers and human impact thereon.
Wohl states her purpose early on in the introductory chapter as to "explore how the changes humans impose can impoverish the rivers, and by extension impoverish all the many creatures that rely on both of them." She goes on to explain that of the ten rivers covered only three remain relatively untouched by humans and the other seven are "undergoing rapid change" (Wohl, p. 2). From the first sentence of each chapter does the information start flowing from the page. There are no pointless introductions or meaningless paragraphs that drag on, but rather she exemplifies the rivers by describing them very concretely. The chapter in which she describes the Amazon is a wonderful sample of how she writes about the rivers and their components. She illustrates that the Amazon watershed stretches from the wester shoreline of the Pacific Ocean all the way to the eastern shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean and is the largest watershed in the world.
In her chapter on the Nile the entire fluvial process is elucidated, starting from the mouths of both Lake Victoria and Lake Tana (the beginning of the White Nile and the beginning of the Blue Nile). Covering every aspect of the hydrologic cycle in both the White and Blue Nile and then continuing once they convene, Wohl shows the reader exactly the comfortable proportion of facts and narration to make these sections easy to read.
The book as a whole is a wonderful initiation into the study of fluvial systems in the world and holds a multitude of information on the world's ten largest rivers. The message is conveyed in an easy to follow style and the fact-based information is happily coupled with integrating interludes that take a more creative look at the chapter covered prior. The book's main point, the human's impact on the rivers, is shown throughout each chapter even if the river still remains for the most part untouched and leads the reader to follow up with her thesis by sparking a sense of curiosity in the reader and a desire to travel to these far off places of beauty which has been subject to so many a poem.
However, as the book is targeted towards the ten biggest rivers in the world it may not speak as passionately to some as the content does not touch upon the smaller fluvial systems that may be closer to home. This is hardly a large diminishing factor in the overall quality of the work, but merely a side note and spoiler that some may be expecting upon reading the book.
This is a fantastic volume on the world's largest fluvial systems that should be in the bookshelves of each who studies or has some sort of interest in the rivers that host such beautiful parts of the natural world.