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eBook Home Studio Setup: Everything You Need to Know from Equipment to Acoustics (The Mastering Music Series) download

by Ben Harris

eBook Home Studio Setup: Everything You Need to Know from Equipment to Acoustics (The Mastering Music Series) download ISBN: 0240811348
Author: Ben Harris
Publisher: Focal Press; 1 edition (February 4, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 200
ePub: 1155 kb
Fb2: 1640 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf lit lrf mobi
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Start reading Home Studio Setup (The Mastering Music Series) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Start reading Home Studio Setup (The Mastering Music Series) on your Kindle in under a minute. One can learn a great deal here about home studio construction, get a good refresher on basic acoustic principles (or learn them for the first time), and be happily informed about what's happening in the DAW world; however, I was left with as many questions as I began with.

Whether you have a ton of equipment or just the basic gear this book offers an all you need to know to setting up, running and getting . In three parts Harris walks you thought Acoustics, Equipment and Recording Technique.

Whether you have a ton of equipment or just the basic gear this book offers an all you need to know to setting up, running and getting great sound from a project studio. From the basics of acoustic treatment to techniques to solve problems specific to your room, and from offering explanations and information of equipment to how to record and create a great mix. In no time you'll be recording, producing great music in your very own studio.

Home Studio Setup book. Whether you have a ton of equipment or just the basic gear, this book offers details on all you need to know about getting great sound from a project studio. In three parts, Harris walks you through acoustics, equipment, and recording techniques.

HOME STUDIO SETUP Whether you have a ton of equipment or just the basic gear this book offers an all you need to know to setting up, running and getting great sound from a project studio.

Home Studio Setup" is intended to be an all in one guide for setting up a home studio. The Cover of the Book "Home Studio Setup" by Harris Source. The Strengths of Home Studio Setup. If you are completely new to music production, audio recording and electronics, this book gives you a good introduction from the true start, dedicating the first chapter to acoustics and relating this immediately to a studio’s layout. Home Studio Setup provides information on how to build your studio, including cost saving alternatives to the professional grade products and the pros and cons of different materials.

Download Setup: Music from to Acoustics Series) (The Equipment Studio Home Mastering Know Need You to Everything pdf for free. Download Home Studio Setup: Everything You Need to Know from Equipment to Acoustics (The Mastering Music Series) book.

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Setting up a home recording studio doesn’t need to cost a fortune. You only need 8 pieces of equipment to set up a home recording studio that can produce radio-worthy tracks. Most people spend WAY too much on equipmen. hen what they should be focusing on is their SKILLS. Learn your gear inside out before you even consider upgrading. Before you consider acoustic treatment, you need to make sure to organize your room in the right way. It’s easier to start with an empty room. This gives you a blank canvas to work with. Keep reading if you want to learn what those item. Home Studio Setup: Treating Your Acoustics.

Whether you have a ton of equipment or just the basic gear this book offers an all you need to know to setting up, running and getting great sound from a project studio. In three parts Harris walks you thought Acoustics, Equipment and Recording Technique. From the basics of acoustic treatment to techniques to solve problems specific to your room, and from offering explanations and information of equipment to how to record and create a great mix. In no time you'll be recording, producing great music in your very own studio. * Provides information on how to make the right decisions when buying and installing equipment, learn how to set up a quality studio* Covers recording technique, teaches how to make high quality mixes * Covers acoustics and studio design, understand acoustics without going down the road of becoming a professional acoustician
Comments: (7)
Jaiarton
Home Studio Recording attempts in it's slender volume to lay out the basics for home recording. The problem with technology books is that the technology becomes outdated quickly. At the end of the day, the best books avoid talking about specific technologies and spend more time talking about general ideas that can be applied to a variety of different types of gear. A good audio engineering book from 10 years ago is still valuable today, simply because the basic laws of acoustics haven't changed, most microphone types are the same, miking and audio techniques are pretty much the same.

This is not to say that there isn't a need for reference materials on audio technology that are current and feature new solutions, but the problem here is that desktop audio production changes fairly rapidly. Were any audio production books talking about the ubiquitous Antares Autotune a few years back? This is why the internet was invented ;-)

So, this book is in a difficult place. As one reviewer has already pointed out, the author is enamored with ProTools, but there are so many options for audio composition and production tools now that choices are specialized; we have Abelton Live, Reason, Logic, Cubase......all are good tools that work best for some things versus others.

I have an old-ish (5 years old) copy of the "Audio in Media" textbook. It is a little more generalized, but I think it also provides a better overall introduction to audio engineering for someone just getting started. Warning - it is a textbook - so it is kind of dry - but it also works well as a good introductory text to recording, and as the title suggests, using audio in various types of media. It is a pretty good reference book for this reason, which is why I have held on to my copy. While DAW technology will continue to change, knowing how to mike a stringed instrument well has not changed radically in the last 10 years.
Shistus
I wish I could give the book 3.5 stars because what actually IS covered generally is covered quite well: for instance, the entire section on acoustics (not to mention the helpful acoustical tidbits peppering the lessons along the way) is fabulously done. I took a college-level course in Acoustical Physics, and this book offers NO misinformation. Well done!

However, I spend my time as a private music teacher and professional free-lance performer who teaches a variety of percussion instruments, want to get into recording myself playing numerous percussion instruments, and desire to create a decent home-setup where I can record students' audition/demo pieces. I can envision that a large number of people purchasing this book are instrumental musicians who don't play in a band. If you are one of these people, this book is probably going to leave you with a LOT of unanswered questions as it did me.

A big surprise is that the author suggests a number of micing techniques, as well as very generally pointing out what types of microphones (dynamic, ribbon, condenser...) work best for what general instrument groups (mainly in one chart on one page), but he offers very little in tangible tips on micing techniques that don't involve, say, voice or acoustic guitar or drum kit, and even on those, the information is pretty thin, suggesting essentially that you need to experiment. True, but it would be nice to have some solid reference points and tips to start with. Does the author have no experience to offer in recording instruments other than rock/jazz bands? Why not even a few tips on recording acoustic piano? Euphonium? Flute? Should I choose ribbon mics, dynamics, or condensers (or a combination of several) to record that incredibly complex acoustic beast called the marimba? Timpani? Even in just my world of "percussion," there's a lot more going on than just the drum kit. Huge gaps here.

Another big annoyance are the constant references to his pretty spare website. I've spent a lot of time on the site, and I really haven't found much that is helpful. The site simply looks as though it is at the early stages of being "in process." Since it's clearly supposed to be an equal companion to the book in terms of reference material, one would expect to find much more on it; however, it appears to be more of a project that he got behind on while trying to bring his book to press. Disappointing, though I hope the site does ultimately offer what it promises. It could be an excellent resource.

Being somewhat new to the emerging DAW world, I did learn an incredible amount about what is possible, though not all of it is practical, especially given my needs -- much of my recording will be done with nobody at the controls (I expect this is true of many or most musicians here), so why should I choose to use a laptop rather than a simple console that takes down the tracks to mix later? Does one really need a DAW in such a case? What are the merits of using a DAW versus a simple digital mix board that records to SD cards, creating multiple tracks I can mix later with software that offers fewer on-the-fly options that nobody is going to be there to fiddle with anyway? Is he a ProTools Only person and just doesn't have experience in another area? If so, this book really is more about becoming a home studio-engineer rather than a musician who'd like to record at home. This just seems to be another yawning chasm devoid of data.

Perhaps this is an unfair "pet peeve," but this reader gets annoyed by the claims of a guide that promises to teach you "Everything You Need to Know" but comes up incredibly short of that promise. One can learn a great deal here about home studio construction, get a good refresher on basic acoustic principles (or learn them for the first time), and be happily informed about what's happening in the DAW world; however, I was left with as many questions as I began with.

While this book was well worth reading and taught me much that will prove useful, and I plan to refer back to it frequently, it (and especially the promises of its companion website) did not teach me "Everything [I] Need to Know...." I don't get the feeling the author would claim that himself, as he frequently says that more in-depth texts are available on this or that subject, so did the publisher push that deceptive subtitle onto the text?