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eBook Technologies and Management Strategies for Hazardous Waste Control download

by Office of Technology Assessment

eBook Technologies and Management Strategies for Hazardous Waste Control download ISBN: 1410219496
Author: Office of Technology Assessment
Publisher: University Press of the Pacific (January 25, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 420
ePub: 1697 kb
Fb2: 1641 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt rtf docx doc
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

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Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Стр. 116 - Code defines hazardous waste as a solid waste, or combination of solid wastes, which because of its quantity, concentration, or physical, chemical, or infectious characteristics may - (A) cause, or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible, or incapacitating reversible illness; or (B) pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment.

Office of Technology Assessment. Page Count 410. Collections. Office of Technology Assessment Reports Collection. Показать полную информацию. Office of Technology Assessment. Related Items in Google Scholar.

Technologies and Management Strategies for Hazardous Waste Control. The assessment was originally undertaken at the request of the House Com-mittee on Energy and Commerce. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 83-600706. For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, . Government Printing Office, Washington, . The focus of the study was to be on technological.

Authors: Office of Technology Assessment Staff United States Congress United States . Feel free to highlight your textbook rentals. Included with your book.

Authors: Office of Technology Assessment Staff United States Congress United States Congress Staff. Free shipping on rental returns. 21-day refund guarantee Learn More. Plus a special surprise from Chegg! Learn More. Hazardous waste management, by: Dawson, Gaynor W. Published: (1986). Hazardous waste management engineering, Published: (1987). Technologies and Management Strategies for Hazardous Waste Control. Government Printing Office, 1983. uperfund Strategy Summary. Government Printing Office, 1985. erious Reduction of Hazardous Waste Summary. Government Printing Office, 1986a. ransportation of Hazardous Materials. Government Printing Office, 1986b. rom Pollution to Prevention: A Progress Report on Waste Reduction.

Hazardous-waste management - Hazardous-waste management . If leachate is generated, monitoring and control systems must be provided. Landfilling of hazardous solid or containerized waste is regulated more stringently than landfilling of municipal solid waste.

The most desirable is to reduce the quantity of waste at its source or to recycle the materials for some other productive use. Nevertheless, while reduction and recycling are desirable options, they are not regarded as the final remedy to the problem of hazardous-waste disposal.

Hazardous waste management is an area of the waste management field concerned with the proper containment, management, and disposal of wastes which could be considered hazardous. In this paper, we use a multicriteria evaluation method, namely VIKOR, for various hazardous waste treatment. alternatives under fuzzy environment.

SOURCE: Office of Technology Assessment. 1) Still have some waste to manage

SOURCE: Office of Technology Assessment. 1) Still have some waste to manage. umes of nonhazardous waste by removal of hazardous constituents to forma concentrated hazardous waste, For example, metal-finishing rinse water is rendered nonhazardous by sepa-ration of toxic metals.

This report presents the analyses, findings, and conclusions of OTA's study of the Federal program for the management of nonnuclear industrial hazardous waste --an issue that has now reached national prominence and widespread congressional attention. OTA's findings and conclusions concerning the technical components of the Federal hazardous waste program complement current activities which have focused more on administrative problems and issues. Our work offers a number of opportunities, at this critical time, for examining solutions to national hazardous waste problems. In conducting the study, OTA analyzed a wide range of views --from the technical community, industrial sectors which generate hazardous waste, the waste management industry, the environmental community, State and local officials, Federal agencies, and the lay public. As a result of that effort, OTA identified four policy options --beyond maintaining the current Federal program-- which could form the basis for an immediate and comprehensive approach to protecting human health and the environment from the dangers posed by mismanagement of hazardous waste. One near-term option addresses the means to improve the technical effectiveness of the current regulatory structure. The other near-term option provides a nonregulatory or market approach to achieving a number of desired goals. Both of these options are compatible with the two longer term options, one of which deals with introducing waste and facility classifications into the regulatory structure, and the other which focuses on achieving greater integration of Federal programs, agencies, and statutes concerned with hazardous waste.