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eBook No Downlink: A Dramatic Narrative About the Challenger Accident and Our Time download

by Barbara Haveland,Claus Jensen

eBook No Downlink: A Dramatic Narrative About the Challenger Accident and Our Time download ISBN: 0374120366
Author: Barbara Haveland,Claus Jensen
Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (January 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 397
ePub: 1242 kb
Fb2: 1707 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf rtf mbr doc
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering

Claus Jensen (Author), Barbara Haveland (Translator) .

Claus Jensen (Author), Barbara Haveland (Translator). ISBN-13: 978-0374120368. In a gripping narrative that comprises a strong cautionary tale, Jensen, a Danish professor of literature, views the Challenger disaster as a prime example of the crippling bureaucracy of large organizations. One of the first books of the Challenger disaster, this is a good general discussion of that event as well as a decent analysis of NASA's perceived "downfall" from the heights of the Apollo program to the stressed, over-ranging attempts at cheap, monthly launches of the Shuttle.

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Jensen, Claus, 1949-. Uniform Title: Challenger, et teknisk uheld. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

The book dramatically recounts the story of Challenger, including the hectic preparations (influenced by everything . Barbara J. Haveland (born 1951) translates fiction, poetry and drama from Danish and Norwegian to English.

The book dramatically recounts the story of Challenger, including the hectic preparations (influenced by everything from Vice President Bush's travel plans to missing spare parts) and the postmortem investigation spearheaded by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman. features works by many leading Danish and Norwegian writers including Peter Hoeg, Ib Michael, Jan Kjaerstad and Linn Ullmann.

The Challenger explosion, ten years ago next month, was the most .

The Challenger explosion, ten years ago next month, was the most traumatic setback to the US space program to date. Here, a Danish professor of literature and space-travel enthusiast tries to put it in context. Using mostly secondary sources, Jensen explains that, from the start, there were conflicts between the scientific and political arms of NASA. But during the Apollo missions, the space program was held together by the common goal of putting an American on the moon.

A Dramatic Narrative about the Challenger Accident and Our Time.

book by Claus Jensen  . Sounding a warning about our dangerous reliance on technology and its complex infrastructure, this intriguing study of the Challenger tragedy argues that the disaster was inevitable because of the perilous interrelationship among politics, big business, and science.

The book dramatically recounts the story of Challenger, including the . With elegance and wit, Claus Jensen traces the history of rockets, from Wernher von Braun to the development of the "NASA culture. Less a history of just the Challenger disaster, Jensen writes of the history of rocket development in the first section at some length, a distance some readers who prefer focus on the Challenger accident may not wish to travel.

ISBN 13: 9780374120368.

Farrar, Straus, Giroux, New YorkGoogle Scholar. Levack BP (1987) The witch-hunt in early modern Europe. Longman, LondonGoogle Scholar. Marx D (2001) Patient safety and the ‘‘just culture’’: a primer for health care executives. Columbia University, New YorkGoogle Scholar. McLean B, Elkind P (2004) The smartest guys in the room: the amazing rise and scandalous fall of Enron. Portfolio, New YorkGoogle Scholar. O’Neill B (2012) Concordia provides no morality tale.

1996) The Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture and Deviance at NASA.

New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux. 1987) Challenger: A Major Malfunction. Garden City, NY: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-23877-0 Vaughan, Diane. 1996) The Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture and Deviance at NASA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Sounding a warning about our dangerous reliance on technology and its complex infrastructure, this intriguing study of the Challenger tragedy argues that the disaster was inevitable because of the perilous interrelationship among politics, big business, and science.
Comments: (4)
Halloween
Having checked this book out several years ago from the local library, I couldn't wait to get my own copy, and I'm enjoying it just as much the second time around. Very well written and suspenseful, even though I know the 'end' of the story.

There are many, many sub-stories behind the Challenger disaster. This book does a great job of piecing all of them together into one coherent time line.
Onoxyleili
It's a 'must read' for anyone remotely interested in the Challenger disaster.
Ironrunner
I read this book because it seemed to be the only book in print that most closely approximated the one for which I was looking: a straight-forward history of the Challenger disaster. (Another, similar leading book about the disaster seemed to reduce the subject to a risk management study, or so I surmised from its descriptions and reviews, which is not at all what I wanted!) While the sections of this book that are actually about the shuttle disaster are riveting, they only make up about one-half the book, the remainder being a history of rocketry and space exploration up to the time of the shuttle. I could have done without this extra information, not that it was dull, but it was superfluous in the context of a book that seemed on the surface to be primarily about the Challenger disaster. I think an editor should have advised the author to squeeze the first half of the book into a single chapter or introduction, and then to go directly into the shuttle disaster. Also, because the book was originally written in a non-English language and then translated into English, there seem to be some odd or awkward phrases throughout the work. The translator's most peculiar habit is to switch from past to present tense, which I found distracting, along with the author's tendency to use incomplete sentences, which, while I understand was a stylistic choice on his part, forces careful readers to stop and re-read sentences in order to make sure they didn't miss something. It's a book worth reading, but I don't think the definitive book on this subject has yet to be written, especially since the author did not rely on any of his own interviews with persons close to the subject (such as NASA personnel and astronauts' families).
Glei
One of the first books of the Challenger disaster, this is a good general discussion of that event as well as a decent analysis of NASA's perceived "downfall" from the heights of the Apollo program to the stressed, over-ranging attempts at cheap, monthly launches of the Shuttle. Jensen gives a balanced account of the Launch decision making (although, I agree with the previous reviewer that he could have provided much more technical detail) and subsequent investigation(s) and does a fair job at blaming the right people without seeming to point the finger. Overall, a good starting point for details of the accident, it'll probably make you pursue other accounts (like D. Vaughn's "Challenger Launch Decision").