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eBook An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students download

by Ron Berger

eBook An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students download ISBN: 0325005966
Author: Ron Berger
Publisher: Heinemann; 1st edition (July 30, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 156
ePub: 1927 kb
Fb2: 1277 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc mbr rtf mbr
Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

Ron Berger is one of the most remarkable teachers in America today

Ron Berger is one of the most remarkable teachers in America today. He sets incredibly high standards in his classes and his students measure up to those standards. Yet Ron Bergers authentic standards bear little resemblance to what passes for standards in todays test-obsessed America. For an independent reading project, I chose to read An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students by Ron Berger, published by Heinemann. I was intrigued by the premise of this book as my family is currently in the midst of remodeling our home.

An Ethic of Excellence book. Others have written that Berger's ethic is hard to engender or apply at the high school level since he, a primary teacher with block scheduling, has "one group of students whom I see almost all day" (141). I am currently in this camp of "How can I do this?" thinkers, but I am open to be persuaded otherwise.

An Ethic of Excellence Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students Ron Berger Heinemann Portsmouth, NH Heinemann A division of Reed Elsevier Inc. 361 Hanover Street Portsmouth, NH 03801–3912 ww. einemann. There is an appetite for excellence. After students have had a taste of excellence, they’re never quite satisfied with less; they’re always hungry.

I have students whose lives are generally easy and students with physical disabilities, and health or family problems that . The key to excellence is this: it is born from a cultur. nce children enter a culture with a powerful ethic, that ethic becomes their nor. hat they know.

I have students whose lives are generally easy and students with physical disabilities, and health or family problems that make life a struggl. n the end, they need to be proud of their work and their work needs to be worthy of pride. ) He attributes remarkable & demonstrable success to a hard earned culture of the school that instills an ethic of. excellence. I don’t believe there’s a shortcut to building a new culture. the process of schooling itself imbues values – we have no choice about this.

Yet, as all good books are wont to do, the ideas Ron Berger puts forth are timeless and timely, which leads me to muse that perhaps this book should be shelved under classics?

Yet, as all good books are wont to do, the ideas Ron Berger puts forth are timeless and timely, which leads me to muse that perhaps this book should be shelved under classics? Or, maybe even in a genre I’ve named, iconoclastic professional literature? In any case, An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students did not disappoint.

He argues for a paradigm shift - a schoolwide embrace of an "ethic of excellence. RON BERGER has been a public school teacher in western Massachusetts for 25 years

He argues for a paradigm shift - a schoolwide embrace of an "ethic of excellence. A master carpenter as well as a gifted teacher, Berger is guided by a craftsman's passion for quality, describing what's possible when teachers, students, and parents commit to nothing less than the best. RON BERGER has been a public school teacher in western Massachusetts for 25 years. Bibliographic information. An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students.

Co-authoring a book with Deborah Meier on the topic of assessment. Under contract with Teachers College Press, to be published June 2017.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for An Ethic of Excellence: Building a. .

An Ethic of Excellence Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students by Berger 9780325005966 (Paperback, 2003) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 10 to 12 working days. Read full description.

Ron Berger, Howard Gardner, Deborah Meier. Drawing from his own remarkable experience as a veteran classroom teacher (still in the classroom), Ron Berger gives us a vision of educational reform that transcends standards, curriculum, and instructional strategies. He argues for a paradigm shift - a schoolwide embrace of an "ethic of excellence.

Schools 1 (2), 166-170, 2004. Seeing like a state: How educational policy misreads what is important in schools. M Knoester, P Parkison. Educational Studies 53 (3), 247-262, 2017. The flat world and books about education reform. American Journal of Education 119 (4), 633-639, 2013.

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Comments: (7)
Butius
For an independent reading project, I chose to read An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students by Ron Berger, published by Heinemann. The paperback is 156 pages and priced currently on Amazon at $21.55. I was intrigued by the premise of this book as my family is currently in the midst of remodeling our home. I have really come to notice and appreciate the craftsmanship of the different skilled workers who have dedicated their talents to our project. Ron Berger is a carpenter but also a teacher, and profoundly extends this idea of craftsmanship to the sphere of education.
Berger is direct in explaining there are no quick fixes and no proven steps for success in this endeavor. This may be frustrating to some, but I agree with his assessment and appreciate his clarification. Berger provides well-developed ideas and specific examples but places the responsibility on teachers to understand their own unique environments and apply the information he presents.
Berger organizes his ideas into three “toolboxes.” His first toolbox, “School Culture of Excellence,” suggests the power of culture by posing the question, “What if being normal in a school, fitting in, means caring about your work and treating others with respect?” (P36) Berger believes relationships are essential in shaping this sort of culture, and opposes the notion that bigger is better in education. He contends that although facilities should not be poorly maintained, community is lost in our movement in education towards larger districts offering more amenities. While I agree with much of Berger’s assessment on school culture, I am disappointed that Berger does not offer much past a condolence that teachers, in reality, have little to no control over this area.
Berger devoted the most time to his second toolbox “Work of Excellence.” Berger’s emphasis on utilizing models particularly resonated with me. I personally find it so much easier to critique than create. I would rather have an example, identify areas of excellence and areas for improvement, and then apply this knowledge to my own undertaking. Berger explains that he uses a variety of models to encourage creativity, but I believe originality would still be at risk and a disadvantage to consider for this practice.
I appreciated that Berger emphasized quality over quantity, and the expectation of multiple drafts for work. He contrasted this to his experience as a student where “the norm was one draft; anything else was a failure.” (P89) Berger shared how often in his travels that others assumed he was sharing the work of gifted students because of the quality. The quality, however, was a result of hard work and revisions, not innate ability. I found this encouraging and believe this reflects how quality and success in the real world are achieved as well.
I was impressed with the opportunities that Berger designed for students to interact with adults and publicly display their work. I am often surprised at my own kids’ ability or lack of ability to interact appropriately in certain situations, and definitely believe this is a useful skill. I also think Berger identified a very important motivator with students displaying their work publicly. Even in my house project, each craftsman is excited to share their work with my family. They have taken the time needed to complete it to the best of their ability and they are proud of it. They want others to see it and appreciate it. I believe this is true a thousand times over for students and can be employed through so many different avenues.
Finally in the second toolbox, I liked Berger’s insistence that projects do not have to be viewed as additional activities. In his classroom, they are standard aligned curriculum. I appreciate his dedication to work being completed in the classroom instead of assigning projects primarily as homework. I believe this more fairly supports all students to be successful since resources and support at home can vary significantly. Berger also stresses giving students important work; work that they know matters. I agree this engages students and improves effort.
In his third toolbox, “Teaching of Excellence,” Berger empathizes that teaching is a calling which makes the desire of educational decision makers to “teacher-proof curriculum” (P126) especially heartbreaking. Berger laments the increasing number of teachers who feel “isolated, self-protective, and insecure.” (p128) Berger contrasts the United States to other countries where teachers are better supported and better results with students are observed. As with the first toolbox, while I appreciate Berger’s insight and agree with much of his analysis, there is not much provided for teachers to be able to improve this area.
I would recommend this book to educators as an inspiration to revitalize your passion for excellence and a continued treasure of resources upon which to reflect. Berger described the portrait of a teacher who did not care and poignantly concluded that the teacher probably did not begin that way. This book is a good start down a better path. As Berger exhorts, “start small…do something well and build from there.” (P152)
MOQ
This book is simply extraordinary. What you have here is not politically correct mumbo-jumbo, nor radical institution bashing. This book is the result of 25 years of Berger refining his own craft (one of many, in fact), namely being a good teacher, evaluating what works and what doesn't, thinking about it deeply, observing patterns, and delivering them in this gem of a book with dozens of anecdotes to prove his points.

Berger's insight into learning, society, community, politics and human nature is astounding. If you yourself are the kind of person who think deeply about this kind of thing you will find that Berger summarises your conclusions in simple sentences with huge impact. I've never thought "exactly, that's exactly what I think" while reading a book as much as this one.

My field is music education and more specifically composition in music education. I have folders and folders of beautiful work made by children who reworked and reworked draft after draft. I felt the pressure of the paperwork to move onto the next part of the syllabus, but resisted it to allow students more weeks to refine their work and make something truly jaw-dropping. Transformative. Inspirational.

This is the approach that Berger takes - but there's so much more in this book. It points out that the route to success (by which he means both happy, engaged children *and* better grades) is not always easy, and involves more of a philosophical approach to our jobs as teachers (and leaders in our communities) than taking up a bunch of dot points to follow. There's a lifetime of hard work to do. And then he shows why it's worth it.
I'm a Russian Occupant
Berger's anecdotes and reflections are very captivating can be easily read within a few hours. I believe his project & research based approach with high expectations of students and rework until quality is achieved works and should be a championed approach to engaging students' learning through authentic projects and community impact. I just wish he had more examples of how this could be implemented in secondary education where a teacher can only hold students for an hour a day instead of in elementary school, where a teacher can teach interdisciplinary projects more easily because they hold dominion of the students for the whole day and can devote hours each day to a singular project. Practicality-wise, our secondary & middle schools simply are not going to switch to a 1 teacher format, so I wonder what the best way to is to wrap some of his work into higher grade teaching, because it truly is valuable.
Zorve
This book provides a completely different side to educational practice as opposed to the typical focus on the asumption that high test scores are the only gauge of student learning and pre-scripted curriculum, canned instruction, and narrow administrative evaluation are the only ways to achieve that "high level of learning". In other words, if you are looking for a quick fix approach to improving student test scores, you will not glean much from this book. Mr. Berger offers an approach to quality student learning though authentic learning experiences for kids as well as ongoing learning for the teachers working alongside their students. Using his experience as a carpenter as a backdrop for his success as a teacher, Mr. Berger provides three toolboxes that collectively provide a clear picture of what an excellent school culture, excellent student work, and excellent teaching look like. As a secondary school principal constantly looking for ways to improve his school, this book provided a tremendous example of what is possible in public education. If you are serious about quality change in our schools - this is a must read for you and for your staff.