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eBook The University of Toronto: A History download

by Martin Friedland

eBook The University of Toronto: A History download ISBN: 0802044298
Author: Martin Friedland
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; First Edition edition (March 15, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 784
ePub: 1429 kb
Fb2: 1461 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf lit txt azw
Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

1 online resource (xiii, 764 pages) : "The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions.

1 online resource (xiii, 764 pages) : "The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions. In this history of the University from its origin as King's College in 1827 to the present, Martin Friedland brings personalities, events, and changing visions and ideas into a remarkable synthesis.

The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions

The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions. Covering the history of the University from its origins as King's College in 1827 to the present.

The history of the University of Toronto as recounted by Friedland is intimately connected with events outside the University

The history of the University of Toronto as recounted by Friedland is intimately connected with events outside the University. The transition in Canadian society, for example, from early dependence on Great Britain and fear of the United States to the present dominance of American culture and ideas is mirrored in the University. There too can be seen the effects of the two world wars, the cold war, and the Vietnam war. As Canadian society and culture have developed and changed, so too has the University. The history of the University in a sense is the history of Canada.

Martin Friedland, . His book The University of Toronto: A History was published in 2002, on the 175th anniversary of the University's foundation. is University Professor and James M. Tory Professor of Law Emeritus at the Faculty of Law. He holds a . omm. from the University of Toronto, and a P. and L. from Cambridge University. Professor Friedland taught at Osgoode Hall Law School until 1965 when he joined the University of Toronto as an associate professor. He was promoted to professor in 1968 and served as dean from 1972-1979.

The University of Toronto book. Covering the history of the University from its origins as King's College in 1827 to the present, Martin Friedland weaves together personalities, events, and intellectual ideas to create a scholarly, yet highly readable history that includes maj The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions.

Two histories of the University of Toronto have been published, one in 1906 and one in 1927. The author of several books on legal history, Professor Friedland brings to this task an accomplished eye and ear and a status as a long time member of the University community. Since the latter volume appeared, no comprehensive history of the University has been published. Professor Friedland's text is accompanied by over 200 maps, drawings and photographs.

The history of the University of Toronto as described by Friedland is intimately connected with events outside the University

The history of the University of Toronto as described by Friedland is intimately connected with events outside the University. Transitions in Canadian society such as that from the early dependence on Great Britain and fear of the United States to the present dominance of American culture and ideas can be seen mirrored in the University

Two histories of the University of Toronto have been published, one in 1906 and one in 1927. Professor Friedland’s text is accompanied by over 200 maps, drawings and photographs.

Martin Friedland of University of Toronto, Toronto (U of T) Read 26 publications, and contact .

In this history of the University from its origin as King's College in 1827 to the present, Martin Friedland brings personalities, events, and changing visions and ideas into a remarkable synthesis.

The University of Toronto is Canada's leading university and one of Canada's most important cultural and scientific institutions. Covering the history of the University from its origins as King's College in 1827 to the present, Martin Friedland weaves together personalities, events, and intellectual ideas to create a scholarly, yet highly readable history that includes major figures such as Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan, and dramatic events such as the admission of women in the 1880s, the University College fire of 1890, the University's contributions during the First and Second World Wars, and the student protests of the 1960s.

In researching and writing the book Friedland drew on archival records, private diaries, oral interviews, and a vast quantity of secondary literature. He also drew on his own knowledge of the University as a student in the 1950s, and later as a faculty member and dean of law who was involved in some of the issues he discusses.

The history of the University of Toronto as described by Friedland is intimately connected with events outside the University. Transitions in Canadian society such as that from the early dependence on Great Britain and fear of the United States to the present dominance of American culture and ideas can be seen mirrored in the University. One can also trace the affects of the two World Wars, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. As Canadian society and culture developed and changed through the latter half of the twentieth century, do too did the university: this university's history is the history of Canada and all Canadians.

The first history of the university in seventy-five years, The University of Toronto: A History will be published to coincide with the University's 175th anniversary. Anyone who attended the University or who is interested in the growth of Canada's intellectual heritage will enjoy this compelling and magisterial work.