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by Michael S. Katz,Susan Verducci,Gert Biesta

eBook Education, Democracy and the Moral Life download ISBN: 1402086253
Author: Michael S. Katz,Susan Verducci,Gert Biesta
Publisher: Springer; 2009 edition (October 21, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 146
ePub: 1898 kb
Fb2: 1737 kb
Rating: 4.2
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Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

Focuses on the interactions between education, democracy and the moral life.

Focuses on the interactions between education, democracy and the moral life. Engages with the role of moral education and moral issues more generally in democratic education. Written by recognised international experts. eBook 51,16 €. price for Russian Federation (gross).

The essays in this book explore the interconnections between democracy, education and the moral life. Rarely are all three engaged and integrated at once so that issues in political and moral theory apply directly to critical issues in education

The essays in this book explore the interconnections between democracy, education and the moral life. Rarely are all three engaged and integrated at once so that issues in political and moral theory apply directly to critical issues in education.

Education, Democracy and the Moral Life. Michael S. Katz, Susan Verducci, Gert Biesta. Скачать (pdf, 903 Kb).

Springer 9789048123551 : Explores the interconnections between democracy, education and the moral li. Focus is placed on the consequences of globalization for democracy, especially in light of the exclusion that global policies impose on many citizens. More importantly, if democracy does require some kind of exclusion, is the idea of global democracy then rendered paradoxical? Is it possible to create a democracy on a global level?

Michael S. Katz, P. Susan Verducci, P. Where democracy, education, and the moral life intersect, certain opposites collide to become self-contained. 1 Suspending the law of noncontradiction can be a risky endeavor.

Michael S. Education, Democracy, and the Moral Life. Centuries after Aristotle proposed it, the Persian philosopher Avicenna wrote: Anyone who denies the law of non-contradiction should be beaten and burned until he admits that to be beaten is not the same as not to be beaten, and to be burned is not the same as not to be burned.

All the essays in this volume, with the exception of those by Gert Biesta, Susan Verducci, and Michael Katz, were developed from l- tures given as part of the series.

Start by marking Education, Democracy and the Moral Life as Want to Read . All the essays in this volume, with the exception of those by Gert Biesta, Susan Verducci, and Michael Katz, were developed from l- tures given as part of the series

Start by marking Education, Democracy and the Moral Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. All the essays in this volume, with the exception of those by Gert Biesta, Susan Verducci, and Michael Katz, were developed from l- tures given as part of the series. The general This volume has its origin in the Francis T. Villemain Memorial lectures at San Jose State University - a lecture series established in 1992 to honor the memory of 1 Dean Francis T. Villemain. Dordrecht/Boston: Springer Science + Business Media. The philosophy of education. Boulder, C. London: Paradigm Publishers. ISBN 978-1-59451-53 hardcover.

This volume has its origin in the Francis T. Villemain Memorial lectures at San Jose State University – a lecture series established in 1992 to honor the memory of 1 Dean Francis T. Villemain. All the essays in this volume, with the exception of those by Gert Biesta, Susan Verducci, and Michael Katz, were developed from l- tures given as part of the series. The general rubric of the lectures was “democracy, education, and the moral life” – a title reflecting Villemain’s lifelong love of the work of John Dewey whose preface to his famous work in 1916, Democracy and Education, suggested that the purpose of education was to develop democratic ci- zens, citizens infused with the spirit of democracy and the capacity to think and act intelligently within democratic settings. Of course, for Dewey, democracy was not to be conceived of as merely a political form of government, but as a shared form of social life, one that was inclusive rather than exclusive and one that was capable of adapting to the changing features of contemporary social and political reality. Francis T. Villemain’s appreciation for the intersections of the values of dem- racy, education, and the moral life was heightened by his doctoral work at Teachers College, Columbia University in the 1950s – where Dewey’s legacy remained a powerful one. But it also continued during his career at Southern Illinois University where he collaborated in compiling and editing the collected works of John Dewey.