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by Sharon L. Nichols,David C. Berliner,Nel Noddings

eBook Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools download ISBN: 1891792369
Author: Sharon L. Nichols,David C. Berliner,Nel Noddings
Publisher: Harvard Education Press (March 1, 2007)
Language: English
ePub: 1297 kb
Fb2: 1885 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

Nichols and Berliner show how the pressures of high-stakes testing erode the validity of test scores and distort the . Sharon L. Nichols is an assistant professor at the University of Texas at San Antonia

Nichols and Berliner show how the pressures of high-stakes testing erode the validity of test scores and distort the integrity of the education system. Their analysis provides a comprehensive intellectual framework for arguments against high-stakes testing, while putting a compelling human face on the data marshaled in support of those arguments. Nichols is an assistant professor at the University of Texas at San Antonia. David C. Berliner is the Regents’ Professor of Education at Arizona State University in Tempe.

6 How High-Stakes Testing Undermines Public Education and the Teaching Profession While Also Destroying Both Teacher . Nichols thanks T. L. GOOD and M. M. McCASLIN. Berliner is grateful to B. J. BIDDLE, U. CASANOVA, and. N. gage.

6 How High-Stakes Testing Undermines Public Education and the Teaching Profession While Also Destroying Both Teacher and Student Morale.

Sharon L. Nichols, David C. Berliner, Nel Noddings. For more than a decade, the debate over high-stakes testing has dominated the field of education. This passionate and provocative book provides a fresh perspective on the issue and powerful ammunition for opponents of high-stakes tests.

Collateral Damage How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools Nichols and Berliner provide a hard-hitting and thoughtful critique of today’s overreliance on high-stakes testing

Collateral Damage How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools. Nichols and David C. Berliner, foreword by Nel Noddings. ebook Pub. Date: March 2007 ISBN-13: 978-1-61250-080-5. Nichols and Berliner provide a hard-hitting and thoughtful critique of today’s overreliance on high-stakes testing. This is a must-read for anyone concerned about the unintended consequences of education reform. Paul D. Houston, Executive Director, American Association of School Administrators.

Nichols and Berliner illustrate both aspects of this corruption, showing how the pressures of high-stakes testing erode the validity of test scores and distort the integrity of the education system. Their analysis provides a coherent and comprehensive intellectual framework for the wide-ranging arguments against high-stakes testing, while putting a compelling human face on the data marshalled in support of those arguments. Download Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools by Sharon L. Berliner, Nel Noddings free.

Is high-stakes testing distorted, broken, or corrupt? In Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America s Schools, notable . Sharon L Nichols, Sharon Lynn Nichols, David C Berliner. Place of Publication.

Is high-stakes testing distorted, broken, or corrupt? In Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America s Schools, notable authors investigate how trumping the importance of testing detracts from education s effectiveness and integrity.

Collateral Damage book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Collateral Damage: How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Collateral Damage : How High-Stakes Testing Corrupts America's Schools. Many years ago an educator from Britain and I were discussing the direction that public education in America was taking. by David C. Berliner and Sharon L. Nichols. After a while, my visitor remarked, "What a shame.

Collateral damage: How high-stakes testing corrupts America's schools. SL Nichols, DC Berliner. education policy analysis archives 14, 1, 2006. The inevitable corruption of indicators and educators through high-stakes testing. High-stakes testing and student achievement: Updated analyses with NAEP data. S Nichols, G Glass, D Berliner. education policy analysis archives 20, 20, 2012.

Berliner, David . Nichols, Sharon L. (2007-03-12). High-Stakes Testing Is Putting the Nation At Risk". Collateral damage: how high-stakes testing corrupts America's schools. Harvard Education Press. Nichols, Sharon . Berliner, David C. (March 2005). The Inevitable Corruption of Indicators and Educators Through High-Stakes Testing" (PDF). (2007). ISBN 978-1-891792-36-6.

Drawing on their extensive research, Nichols and Berliner document and categorize the ways that high-stakes testing threatens the purposes and ideals of the American education system. For more than a decade, the debate over high-stakes testing has dominated the field of education. This passionate and provocative book provides a fresh perspective on the issue and powerful ammunition for opponents of high-stakes tests. Their analysis is grounded in the application of Campbell’s Law, which posits that the greater the social consequences associated with a quantitative indicator (such as test scores), the more likely it is that the indicator itself will become corrupted—and the more likely it is that the use of the indicator will corrupt the social processes it was intended to monitor. Nichols and Berliner illustrate both aspects of this “corruption,” showing how the pressures of high-stakes testing erode the validity of test scores and distort the integrity of the education system. Their analysis provides a coherent and comprehensive intellectual framework for the wide-ranging arguments against high-stakes testing, while putting a compelling human face on the data marshalled in support of those arguments.
Comments: (7)
Mejora
I read this as a textbook and I really liked it. The book reads as someone telling you stories from what they have seen in their lifetime. As an educator, I could relate to the stories, and see it in my everyday life. It was really easy to relate to, and would recommend to anyone who wants to learn more about education.
Onaxan
This is one of a series of independent scholars who have exposed the horror and emptiness of the practice of using standardized
test to make decisions for students, teachers, and schools. It is just too bad that most state legislators simply won't take the time to read this and other books that have made public the misuse of tests and why.
Daron
This was required for my legal and ethical issues in education course. It's a real eye-opener.
Helo
I think all teachers and parents should read this book. Very interesting studies cited to explain what has happened over the years to our education system.
Rishason
Current administrators and teachers can greatly benefit from the eye opening issues discussed in this book. Powerful anecdotes and thoughtful solutions are offered.
Dagdatus
Great
Tar
Berliner and Nichols take on high-stakes testing at a critical time in this book. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is currently up for renewal and revision, and the broad, bipartisan coalition that passed the initial legislation must decide whether to strengthen the law, modify the law, or radically dismantle it. Berliner and Nichols argue against high-stakes testing due to the corruptive influence of high-stakes tests on educators, students, and parents. Much of their evidence is taken from extensive research in the newspapers along with some analysis of the types of programs and results achieved in states thus far.

A great deal of their analysis rests on applying Campbell's Law to the arena of high stakes test. Campbell's Law states that any time a sociological measure is attached to high stakes consequences, the efforts of people to avoid the high stakes consequences will corrupt the effectiveness of the indicator. Anyone familiar with NCLB will have heard complaints about how the law drives educators to teach to the test; this work goes into far greater detail and systematically analyzes how high-stakes tests are not merely stressful, they invalidate what they are trying to measure. There are many powerful stories in this books of diplomas denied, educators demoralized, and children injured by high-stakes tests. Anyone who has been hurt by NCLB will gather food from this work.

Unfortunately, this book will not sway the politicians who are committed to NCLB very much. Opponents will attempt to muster their own stories of how schools were motivated to get their act together when they had to fear the consequences of the law. At times, Berliner and Nichols accuse their opponents of more sinister motives and do not give them too many olive branches that might lead present supporters of the NCLB and the progressive opposition to break bread and agree that they all want to help children. Partisan politics is the order of the day I suppose, and I feel that truly great books of politics work to transcend those partisan politics and build foundations for effective collaboration.

Still, I found this book a helpful statement of opposition to NCLB that crystallizes many of the frustrations I've encountered when I've tutored SAT. You see families pouring money into the exams and educators manipulating data and you know that you're measuring how well people play the game as well as how much they know of the tested content.

This is a passionate book that will be helpful for educators frustrated by NCLB looking for energy and motivation to organize and strengthen their analysis of the failings of the law.

3.5 stars

--SD
This is perhaps the most important book to date on the perverse effects of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and its mandates for high-stakes testing. The authors provide irrefutable evidence of the problems of a school accountability system which relies on a single indicator--test scores. They explain how when a single social indicator is used to measure something, it corrupts the very thing it is attempting to measure. The authors provide example after example of how the pressure to raise test scores has led to questionable ethical behavior which is harmful to students, schools, and our nation as a whole.

Despite the depressing content, the authors write in a highly accessible and entertaining style, and even manage to interject a bit of humor to lighten the heavy burden which comes when one comtemplates the implications of their findings.

It is a must read for all educators, parents, and policy makers. Indeed, I hope the latter will read this book and make changes the authors suggest for a more reasonable acountability system.