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eBook Developing Talent in Young People download

by Dr. Benjamin Bloom

eBook Developing Talent in Young People download ISBN: 034531509X
Author: Dr. Benjamin Bloom
Publisher: Ballantine Books; First Edition edition (January 12, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 572
ePub: 1911 kb
Fb2: 1267 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw doc txt lrf
Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

Start by marking Developing Talent in Young People as Want to Read .

Start by marking Developing Talent in Young People as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Benjamin S. Bloom was an American educational psychologist who has made contributions to the classification of educational objectives and to the theory of mastery-learning. Books by Benjamin S. Bloom.

The dramatic findings of a ground-breaking study of 120 immensely talented individuals reveal astonishing new information on developing talent in young people

The dramatic findings of a ground-breaking study of 120 immensely talented individuals reveal astonishing new information on developing talent in young people

Bloom's book lays out in great detail his hypothesis that great achievement is the result of training, coaching, and perserverence-not the result of genetic endowment. There has been a growing number of writers on the subject who agree with him-that a person's capabilities are not predetermined or fixed at birth but may be significantly shaped and developed by environment. Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase. This is a great book and suitable for anyone working with children.

Developing Talent in Young People. New York: Ballantine Books. Eisner, Eliot W. "Benjamin Bloom: 1913-1999. pdf on April 10, 2009. Torsten Husén, Benjamin S. Bloom, in: Joy A. Palmer (ed), Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day, London - New York: Routledge, 2001, pp. 86–90.

A Long-Term Commitment to Learning - Generalizations About Talent Development show more. Format Paperback 557 pages. Dimensions 13. 9 x 210 x 3. 7mm 73. 8g. Publication date 01 Apr 1985. Publisher Random House USA Inc. Imprint Ballantine Books Inc.

Developing Talent in Young People, by Benjamin Bloom. The Social Animal, by David Brooks

Developing Talent in Young People, by Benjamin Bloom. The Social Animal, by David Brooks. Talent is Overrated, by Geoff Colvin. One way to do this is to speed things up-to force yourself to do the task faster than you normally would.

Bloom (U. of Chicago, Northwestern) directed a four-year study of the development of talent in children-based on retrospective interviews with ""world-class"" achievers (under age 40) in specific fields, supplemented by talks with the achievers' families and teachers. The results, presented in this long, formal report, are thoroughly unsurprising: ""Exceptional levels of talent development require certain types of environmental support, special experiences, excellent teaching, and appropriate motivational encouragement at each stage of development.

New York: Ballantine Books. Hayes, John R. (1989), The Complete Problem Solver.

Bloom, Benjamin S. (E. (1985), Developing Talent in Young People. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Kaufman, Herbert (1960), The Forest Ranger. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press. March, James G. and Herbert A. Simon (1958), Organizations.

University of Chicago. Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals, Handbook 1: Cognitive Domain" "Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Volume 2: The Affective Domain" "Stability and Change in Human Characteristics" "All Our Children Learning" "Developing Talent in Young People" "Learning for Mastery". Some people may say that my convictions and how the environment can be a vital infleunce has led to the development and establishmnt of the Head Start Program in the United States.

The dramatic findings of a ground-breaking study of 120 immensely talented individuals reveal astonishing new information on developing talent in young people.   • The Nature of the Study and Why It Was Done  • Learning to Be a Concert Pianist  • One Concert Pianist  • The Development of Accomplished Sculptors  • The Development of Olympic Swimmers  • One Olympic Swimmer  • Learning to Be a World-Class Tennis Player  • The Development of Exceptional Research Mathematicians • One Mathematician: “Hal Foster” • Becoming an Outstanding Research Neurologist  • Phases of Learning  • Home Influences on Talent Development  • A Long-Term Commitment to Learning • Generalizations About Talent Development
Comments: (7)
MilsoN
Bloom's book lays out in great detail his hypothesis that great achievement is the result of training, coaching, and perserverence--not the result of genetic endowment. There has been a growing number of writers on the subject who agree with him--that a person's capabilities are not predetermined or fixed at birth but may be significantly shaped and developed by environment.

The author claims that there are very few predictors of a child's future success and great achievement can be "grown" by parents, coaches, schools, and constructive mentors and role models. Bloom's study looked at the childhoods of 120 success stories from several vocational fields and his findings showed no correlation between ultimate success and IQ in such fields as music, science, medicine, chess, and sports. What seemed to count for most of the successful individuals was the enthusiastic support of their family, early exposure to required chores, the development of a sound work ethic, lots of practice and determination, and coaching by devoted teachers.

One of the more interesting parts of this book is the explanation of how our brains and skills develop. Humans, it seems, are quite different from animals, and very different from ants and bees. While they are primarily predetermined by inborn instincts and coded behavior, humans arrive with a vast potential to develop as needed by whatever environment they encounter. It all has to do with something called myelin sheaths that insulate our nervous system and allow specific development of whichever parts of our body are exercised. Thus, our brains and hard wiring are able to grow stronger, just like your biceps, by intensive use, practice, and concerted effort. A newborn gazelle can stand up and flee the lion whereas a human infant is helpless--but years later the gazelle has learned nothing new, while the grown infant may graduate from MIT, discover a new vaccine, and pilot a jet plane.

The positive aspect of Bloom's findings is that it can be applied to helping children grow: They need a rich stimulating environment to fully develop, they require more hands-on experience and less coddling, they need positive feed-back and encouragement, and they must learn to apply themslves, to work hard, and develop self-reliance and determination. The author gives many interesting case studies of parents that provided such advantages for their children and details how they did it, and the time periods required to gain positive results.

The book also explains how current parenting and schooling practices frequently work counter to the ways they should. Children often get negative messages; allowed an over-extended childhood and adolescence that limits their growth, or are not forced to learn how to apply themselves to a task at hand. Such limited development can result in a growing number of "adult children" who have never fully grown up. And he faults teachers because they not only cannot predict which children will succeed, but give preference to those with the narrow set of capacity for memorization and test taking skills. Those so favored receive an "accumulative advantage" by getting special advancement and training even though others may have greater potential for numerous important vocations.

All in all, it is a very interesting and informative book. It can be read in pieces from time to time, and the chapters are all useful independent of each other. But taken as a whole, the book lays out the case for a different type of training needed for our kids, and reveals the large amount of "wasted talent" that comes from not recognizing the many new findings about how our brains and bodies develop.
Twentyfirstfinger
This is a great book and suitable for anyone working with children. Similar in nature, but preceeding Stephen Covey's work in 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, this book looks at common traits among talented young people across a multitude of disciplines. The USOC uses this work as a core fundamental in how coaches should work with kids. While this research and book was written in 1985, current research from Carol Dweck, PhD, and author of Mindset, supports the notion that the "talent" that we see is just a snapshot, a result, of a young persons true talent which is their self-motivated desire. As Bloom states, 100% of young high level performers had, at a young age, a parent, teacher or coach that GAVE them, (not forced on them) a desire for learning or a love of the game. This works in music, math, sports, or anything. You can't get to the top on talent alone! Desire, especially self-motivated desire, which leads to effort is the key! Read it and be transformed in how you work with children!
Talvinl
This book provides crucial information in the field of talent development. The longitudinal studies explain the challenges and possible methods of bringing forth the highest accomplishments for anyone interested in this area. Dr. Bloom is without question an authority on this subject and this is a must read for educators, parents and others in a position of guiding people to their best possible results.
Mitars Riders
Great book!
Winasana
This was a very eye-opening book. I got my friends reading it too.
Meri
During the years I wrote parenting columns for a newspaper and taught parenting classes I used this book repeatedly. It provides researched based guidance for parents who wonder when to start their kids in athletics, artistic, and academic activities and how much to encourage, support and push them. It is also a pleasant, interesting and easy read.
Muniath
This was a gift and my friend really likes it.Thanks a lot for great service.I recommend this book to the public.
Most people are not aware that work of Benjamin Bloom has had drastic influence on the US education. And what do we have to show for it? Not much really. I will dare say that sad state of affairs in our education was partially started by this book and work of its author.

Dr. Bloom starts of by cherry picking wrong examples. Yes, it is impressive to participate in Olympics or a piano competition; but it is far from significant for our world or even on personal level. We don't really know that his examples ended up being the way we would like our children to be.

If we choose wrong examples, observe wrong sets of data, and then proceed to draw wrong conclusions the results are bound to be simply bad. Our modern education in the US is the best proof that we know very little about what it takes to develop talent in young people; following Dr. Bloom's recommendation has brought about general resistance to learning among students and narrow minded focus on measurable results among teachers (how do you measure "understanding" or "happiness" or "interest"?).

Whatever it takes to nurture the next Einstein or da Vinci will not be found in this book.