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eBook Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education download

by Evan Watkins

eBook Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education download ISBN: 0823229823
Author: Evan Watkins
Publisher: Fordham University Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1799 kb
Fb2: 1155 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit doc txt mbr
Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

In Class Degrees, Evan Watkins argues that reforms in vocational education in the 1980s and 1990s can explain a great deal about the changing directions of class formation in the United States, as well as how postsecondary educational institutions are changing. Responding to a demand for flexibility in job skills and reflecting a consequent aspiration to choice and perpetual job mobility, those reforms aimed to eliminate the separate academic status of vocational education.

In Class Degrees, Evan Watkins argues that reforms in vocational education in the 1980s and . Class Degrees - Evan Watkins.

In Class Degrees, Evan Watkins argues that reforms in vocational education in the 1980s and 1990s can explain a great deal about the changing directions of class formation in the United States, as well as how postsecondary educational institutions are changing. As choice begins to replace the selling of individual labor at the core of contemporary class formation, the result is a sort of waste labor left behind by the competitive process.

In Class Degrees, Evan Watkins argues that reforms in vocational education in the 1980s and 1990s can explain a. . They transformed it from a "cooling out" to a "heating up" of class expectations.

Critics see a narrowing of focus to career objectives at the expense of a more broad-based humanities education and the citizenship training necessary to a democracy. There has been much less discussion, however, of the reform initiatives intended to change actual vocational education programs.

Watkins, Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education (New York . Class degrees: Smart work, managed identities, and the transformation of higher education.

Watkins, Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education (New York: Fordham University Press, 2008). A current truism holds that the undergraduate degree today is equivalent to the high-school diploma of yesterday.

He is the author of Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education . This is a valuable work for those in both education (educators in general as well as those in cultural or literacy studies) and business

This is a valuable work for those in both education (educators in general as well as those in cultural or literacy studies) and business. The better we understand what we are really doing and how we have tried doing it, the better we can consciously and systematically teach or utilize those resources.

One of America's foremost scholars of work, class, and education at the top of his game. GCatherine Prendergast, University of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Watkins, Evan. Published: New York : Fordham University Press, 2008.

Class Degrees: Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher.

Class Degrees : Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education.

book by Evan Watkins. Class Degrees : Smart Work, Managed Choice, and the Transformation of Higher Education.

A current truism holds that the undergraduate degree today is equivalent to the high-school diploma of yesterday. But undergraduates at a research university would probably not recognize themselves in the historical mirror of high-school vocational education. Students in a vast range of institutions are encouraged to look up the educational social scale, whereas earlier vocational education was designed to “cool out” expectations of social advancement by training a working class prepared for massive industrialization.

In Class Degrees, Evan Watkins argues that reforms in vocational education in the 1980s and 1990s can explain a great deal about the changing directions of class formation in the United States, as well as how postsecondary educational institutions are changing.

Responding to a demand for flexibility in job skills and reflecting a consequent aspiration to choice and perpetual job mobility, those reforms aimed to eliminate the separate academic status of vocational education. They transformed it from a “cooling out” to a “heating up” of class expectations. The result has been a culture of hyperindividualism.

The hyperindividual lives in a world permeated with against-all-odds plots, from “beat the odds” of long supermarket checkout lines by using self-checkout and buying FasTrak transponders to beat the odds of traffic jams, to the endless superheroes on film and TV who daily save various sorts of planets and things against all odds.

Of course, a few people can beat the odds only if most other people do not. As choice begins to replace the selling of individual labor at the core of contemporary class formation, the result is a sort of waste labor left behind by the competitive process. Provocatively, Watkins argues that, in the twenty-first century, academic work in the humanities is assuming the management function of reclaiming this waste labor as a motor force for the future.