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by Jay P. Greene

eBook Education Myths: What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools--And Why It Isn't So download ISBN: 074254978X
Author: Jay P. Greene
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (January 9, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 280
ePub: 1296 kb
Fb2: 1261 kb
Rating: 4.6
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Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

In doing so, he convincingly disproves 18 common beliefs about public education.

In doing so, he convincingly disproves 18 common beliefs about public education. Perhaps Greene's greatest achievement is to explain why we should be deeply disturbed at the performance of our public schools, but not despair over the prospect of improving them.

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Education Myths: What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe about Our Schools-And Why It Isn’t S.

Education Myths: What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe about Our Schools-And Why It Isn’t So. Jay P. Greene, with Greg Forster and Marcus A. Winters. Foreword by James Q. Wilson. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, In. Buried within this book is a powerful if familiar argument: the American education system is worse than we think and won’t improve unless we change the incentive structure that drives it. Resource levels are hardly the main problem, say the authors; nor is increasing them a likely solution to our schools’ ills

Education Myths What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools-And Why It Isn't So by Jay P. Greene and Publisher Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Education Myths What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools-And Why It Isn't So by Jay P. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780742577879, 0742577872. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780742549784, 074254978X.

Written by. Greene. Manufacturer: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Release date: 9 January 2006 ISBN-10 : 074254978X ISBN-13: 9780742549784.

Jay P. Greene4 ஆகஸ்ட், 2005. Jay Greene provocatively shows that much of what people believe about education policy is little more than a series of myths advanced by the special interest groups dominating public education. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ிருப்பப் பட்டியலில் சேர். 1. 9 மின்புத்தகம் - $ . 9.

Jay Greene talked about his book Education Myths: What Special-Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools - and Why It Isn’t So, published by Rowman and Littlefield Publishers. He argued that special interest groups are dominating public education. In his book he examined eighteen beliefs about American education that he found to be false, . that schools need more money, that poor and immigrant children can’t do as well as other kids, and that school vouchers aren’t effective.

Jay Greene provocatively shows that much of what people believe about education policy is little more than a series of myths advanced by the . Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 4 Ağu 2005 - 280 sayfa. How can we fix America's floundering public schools?

Jay Greene provocatively shows that much of what people believe about education policy is little more than a series of myths advanced by the special interest groups dominating public education. How can we fix America's floundering public schools? Conventional wisdom says that schools and teachers need a lot more money, that poor and immigrant children can't do as well as most American kids, that high-stakes tests just produce teaching to the test, and that vouchers do little to help students while undermining our democracy. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?

What Special Interest Groups Want You to Believe About Our Schools-And Why It Isn't So. by Jay P.

How can we fix America's floundering public schools? Conventional wisdom says that schools and teachers need a lot more money, that poor and immigrant children can't do as well as most American kids, that high-stakes tests just produce teaching to the test, and that vouchers do little to help students while undermining our democracy. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong? Jay Greene provocatively shows that much of what people believe about education policy is little more than a series of myths advanced by the special interest groups dominating public education.
Comments: (7)
Thofyn
Some of the claims suffer from a levels of analysis problem. Funding does matter, but looking across school systems or states won't reveal how funding is used within school systems or within schools. The driving factor is teacher salaries, which are generally tied to experience and local housing economics. Better teachers move to better neighborhoods when those areas offer better salaries. It's a good book to start with, but each one of the points raised could use better research and more evidence. In general, I was disappointed with the quality of the work.
Whitescar
This is truly a great book for anyone interested in better understanding our education system and the ever-present politics surrounding it. Many may consider this book heretical but I thought it was well written and as unbiased as possible.
TheJonnyTest
I don't need lengthy intellectual arguments to understand that it is better to have parents decide where their children go to school, what they are taught, and how resources are distributed. This country was founded upon the concept of individual liberty and the "public" schools(they are government schools, not public schools) have taken this portion of our liberty away.
Dogrel
I care deeply about the education of America's youth. I have worked with an illiterate fifth grader and second graders who did not know a dime from a quarter. High school education rates are currently around 70% with that number around 50% for Hispanics and blacks. Clearly there are problems in the world of public education. Unfortunately, while many have correctly diagnosed a problem in public education too often the wrong cure has been prescribed. "Education Myths" by Jay Greene addresses many of the ineffective cures currently in vogue throughout the country.

The book is full of hard hitting and vitally important facts. For example, dollars spent per student have doubled from $4,479 dollars per year in 1971 to $8,745 per year in 1999. (All numbers have been adjusted for inflation) Yet during this time period scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress test have been flat. Simply throwing more money into the current arena without first correcting major systemic problems would be a major mistake.

This book is a must read for anyone concerned with public education in America.
Ttexav
And that one key myth is that the critics of the Powers that Be in education are, to quote one of the reviewers below, "right-wing" propagandists. Indeed, given the unfortunate political polarization of education policy in America, perhaps this book's greatest liability is the endorsement from Jeb Bush that appears on its cover.

For the most part, Jay Greene backs his claims up with references to specific studies, and one indication that he isn't distorting the data is that his critics haven't found fault with his data. The one exception I found was in his discussion of the Special Education Myth, in which he simply asserts that "any growth in neurological disorders caused by increased numbers of low-birth-weight babies has been more than offset by improvements in the prevention of such disorders in other areas, such as improved prenatal medicine, safe child car seats, and reductions in exposure to lead paint."

Greene does argue, convincingly, that the growth in special ed numbers is largely due to financially-motivated re-classifications. And, if students are generally less teachable than they used to be, it may be more because of teaching failures in the lower grades. But can we be sure that incoming kindergartners aren't less (or more) teachable than they used to be? It would be interesting to survey veteran kindergarten teachers--ones who've remained in the same schools for 20-30 years.

It would also be nice if Greene had included some of the myths that inform current teaching practices and curriculum choices--though these could fill a whole nother book.

These concerns aside, this is a hugely important book that convincingly debunks most of our most debilitating myths--and the left-wing and (yes!) right-wing assumptions that sustain them.
Blacknight
"Education Myths" is one of those "love it or hate it" books. Liberals who have bought into these myths will despise the "reality checks" Greene gives while conservatives will applaud his meticulous debunking of them. Are schools underfunded? Are teachers underpaid? Do smaller class sizes raise student achievement? Does teacher credentialing result in better performance? Do vouchers work? Greene reviews the research on these and other "hot button" issues to demonstrate that the conventional wisdom is very often wrong.