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eBook Preparing Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expectations for Student Learning: New Directions for Higher Education, Number 96 download

by Elizabeth A. Jones

eBook Preparing Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expectations for Student Learning: New Directions for Higher Education, Number 96 download ISBN: 0787998230
Author: Elizabeth A. Jones
Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (January 13, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 120
ePub: 1105 kb
Fb2: 1509 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt lrf lit rtf
Category: Educ
Subcategory: Schools and Teaching

Employers, policymakers, faculty, leaders in higher education, and the public all are concerned about the development and achievement of key cognitive abilities and communication skills by undergraduates. This is the 96th issue of the quarterly journal "New Directions for Higher Education.

A new measure of conversational experience: The speaking extent and comfort scale (SPEACS). Assessment Journal, 6, 2, 189-202

New directions for higher education: Vol. 96, Preparing competent college graduates: Setting new and higher expectations for student learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Larson, . Backlund, . Redmond, . & Barbour, A. (1978). A new measure of conversational experience: The speaking extent and comfort scale (SPEACS). Assessment Journal, 6, 2, 189-202. MacAlpine, J. M. K. (1999, March). Improving and encouraging peer assessment of student presentations. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 24, 1, 15-25. MacIntyre, J. R. & McDonald, P. D. (1998, October). Public speaking anxiety: Perceived competence and audience congenial- ity.

In E. Jones (e., Preparing Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expec-tations for Student . Transforming Higher Education: A Vision for Learning in the 21st Century. Ann Arbor, MI: Society for College and University Planning. Ehrmann, S. C. (1995)., Preparing Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expec-tations for Student Learning. New Directions for Higher Education, No. 96, pp. 81-92. DeNisi, A. and Shaw, J. B. (1977). Ewell, P. and Jones, D. P. (1996).

Preparing competent college graduates: Setting new and higher expectations for student learning. 96. Essential skills in writing, speech and listening, and critical thinking for college graduates: Perspectives of faculty, employers, and policymakers. National Center for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment Project Summary. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University. Loacker, . and Palola, E. (1981)

Preparing competent college graduates: Setting new and higher expectations for student learning. University Park, PA: National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment.

The setting of clear and high expectations for student learning is necessary to help undergraduates reach more advanced levels of. .This is the 96th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Higher Education.

The setting of clear and high expectations for student learning is necessary to help undergraduates reach more advanced levels of achievement. In this volume, the contributors use the results of a nationwide study conducted by the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment to identify specific ways institutions can help undergraduates attain the advanced thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills needed in today's society and workplace.

The current US agenda for global learning encompasses institutions of higher education, faculty, and students

Few institutions, however, have strategically embraced the challenge of developing a mission or agenda for global learning  . The current US agenda for global learning encompasses institutions of higher education, faculty, and students. Few institutions, however, have strategically embraced the challenge of developing a mission or agenda for global learning.

higher education sector can respond to student expectations and how students themselves can engage in.Across all subjects of study, the primary purpose for students entering higher education was to improve their career prospects and as a pathway for career enhancement.

higher education sector can respond to student expectations and how students themselves can engage in enhancing higher education. In the selection of participants the aim was to represent the diversity within UK higher education, including parttime, mature, international and European Union students. Students expected institutions to offer advice and guidance to support them in developing their employability for. 9. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Abstract: How can we habituate learners and workers to engage in thoughtful, fair-minded problem solving, decision making, and professional judgment? Demands for skillful and fair-minded thinkers arise today in every professional field and in our civic and personal lives.

Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expectations for Student Learning

The rationale for this work and some of the findings were recently published in Jones's (1996), Preparing Competent College Graduates: Setting New and Higher Expectations for Student Learning. Part One Expected Student Outcomes for Speaking and Listening: Basic Communication Course and General Education The following student outcomes represent some of the expectations for students taking a basic communication course and/or participating in the general education requirements of a school. Basic course or general education students need speaking and listening skills that will help them succeed in future courses and on the job.

Employers, policymakers, faculty, leaders in higher education, and the public all are concerned about the development and achievement of key cognitive abilities and communication skills by undergraduates. The setting of clear and high expectations for student learning is necessary to help undergraduates reach more advanced levels of achievement. In this volume, the contributors use the results of a nationwide study conducted by the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment to identify specific ways institutions can help undergraduates attain the advanced thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills needed in today's society and workplace. Collectively, these chapters represent work and intiatives aimed at setting more explicit requirements for student learning that are informed by society's expectations. The contributors also describe innovative teaching strategies that can enhance student learning. This is the 96th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Higher Education.