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eBook Human Nature and Public Policy: An Evolutionary Approach download

by A. Somit,S. Peterson

eBook Human Nature and Public Policy: An Evolutionary Approach download ISBN: 1403962855
Author: A. Somit,S. Peterson
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2003 edition (July 3, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 266
ePub: 1297 kb
Fb2: 1891 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf mobi lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

An Evolutionary Approach. STEVEN A. PETERSON is Director of the School of Public Affairs and Professor of Politics and Public Affairs at Penn State Harrisburg.

An Evolutionary Approach. price for USA in USD (gross).

Arguing for an evolutionary perspective, this book directly challenges the Standard Social Science Model (SSSM) on which public policy has often been based. The SSSM maintains that human behavior is solely the product of culture and learning. In sharp contrast, the Evolutionary Model (EM) holds that our behavior flows from the interaction between learning and culture, on the one hand, and biological factors-especially our evolutionary legacy-on the other. These different approaches to human behavior understandably lead to divergent conceptions of sound domestic and foreign policy.

From Human Nature to Public Policy: Evolutionary Theory Challenges the Standard Model Albert Somit and Steven A. Peterson . Peterson Chapter 2 From Theory to Practice: Caveat Emptor Lionel Tiger Part 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5. Chapter 6. Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter . He is active in the European Sociobiological Society and the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences.

Albert Somit, Steven Peterson and the contributors to this volume are all the more convincing that they are not extremists. They do not overstate the case for a sociobiological approach.

Human Nature and Public Policy: An Evolutionary Approach. Albert Somit, Steven A. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb).

These different approaches to human behavior understandably lead to divergent .

These different approaches to human behavior understandably lead to divergent conceptions of sound domestic and foreign policy. Arguing for an evolutionary perspective, this book directly challenges the Standard Social Science Model (SSSM) on which public policy has often been based.

Start by marking Human Nature and Public Policy: An Evolutionary .

Start by marking Human Nature and Public Policy: An Evolutionary Approach as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Somit and Peterson's Human Nature and Public Policy)," Current Anthropology 45, no. 4 (August/October 2004): 564-565.

ACCEPT & CONTINUE.

Human nature and public policy: An evolutionary approach, 3-18, 2003. A Somit, SA Peterson, WD Richardson, DS Goldfischer. Rational choice and biopolitics: A (Darwinian) tale of two theories. A Somit, SA Peterson. PS: Political Science & Politics 32 (1), 39-44, 1999. Observing Supreme Court oral argument: A biosocial approach. JN Schubert, SA Peterson, G Schubert, S Wasby. Politics and the Life Sciences 11 (1), 35-52, 1992. The political behavior of older Americans. SA Peterson, A Somit.

Arguing for an evolutionary perspective, this book directly challenges the Standard Social Science Model (SSSM) on which public policy has often been based. The SSSM maintains that human behavior is solely the product of culture and learning. In sharp contrast, the Evolutionary Model (EM) holds that our behavior flows from the interaction between learning and culture, on the one hand, and biological factors-especially our evolutionary legacy-on the other. These different approaches to human behavior understandably lead to divergent conceptions of sound domestic and foreign policy. The SSSM views human behavior as essentially plastic and thus readily changed by governmental action. Disagreeing, the Evolutionary Model sees that malleability as seriously limited by our species' evolved propensity for aggression, status seeking, xenophobia, ethnocentrism, and hierarchical social structures.
Comments: (2)
Zulurr
Yet another book that misses the point. I deduce that from the description. HINT. discovering that primitive man, the noble savage of Rousseau, was not noble, and was in fact a brutal savage, is NOT evidence for conservative political ideology. (capitalism). Evidence that we used to be more brutally competitive than we are now is evidence for PROGRESS. Progressives are free of the noble savage now. 2. To use evidence of brutality in ancient man as evidence for embracing brutality, commits the NATURALISTIC FALLACY. If we understand these brutal drives, we can override them with civilized behavior and the rule of law. That is exactly what is happening. Culture evolves too, and we get a little more democracy with every generation. Even war casualties go down over time. The fact that the savage was NOT noble is evidence for the left, and Rousseau was wrong about the noble savage.
spark
This book is a bit uneven. Some of the chapters don't seem to fit too well (such as the Zak chapter). However, the book's argument--that evolutionary theory suggests different policy solutions to problems than standard social science theory--is nicely illustrated by other chapters. Chapters by Ellis and McGuire/Gruter and Blank all get one thinking that a knowledge of human nature might be very helpful in figuring out how we might address public problems.

Thus, while it is regrettable that some chapters wander away from the book's theme, those chapters that address the central issues of the book (as outlined in the introductory essay) serve a valuable purpose.