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eBook Racial Profiling in Canada: Challenging the Myth of 'a Few Bad Apples' download

by Frances Henry,Carol Tator

eBook Racial Profiling in Canada: Challenging the Myth of 'a Few Bad Apples' download ISBN: 0802087140
Author: Frances Henry,Carol Tator
Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 2nd ed. edition (July 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1296 kb
Fb2: 1346 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf rtf lrf mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Racial Profiling in Canada book.

Racial Profiling in Canada book. In this comprehensive and thought-provoking work, Carol Tator and Frances Henry explore the meaning of racial profiling in Canada as it is practised not only by the police but also by many other social institutions. The authors provide a theoretical framework within which they examine racial profiling from a number of perspectives and in a variety of situations.

Tator and Henry develop these central claims through the use of several theoretical models and quantitative and qualitative data. The theoretical perspectives from which these authors draw are rich and varied. The authors explicitly single out four theoretical perspectives to explain the ubiquity of racial profiling in Canada: whiteness studies, blackness studies, racial profiling and danger racialization theory, and discourse analysis (pp. 21-37).

In this comprehensive and thought-provoking work, Carol Tator and Frances Henry explore the meaning of racial .

In this comprehensive and thought-provoking work, Carol Tator and Frances Henry explore the meaning of racial profiling in Canada as it is practised not only by the police but also by many other social institutions. In October 2002, the Toronto Star ran a series of feature articles on racial profiling in which it was indicated that Toronto police routinely target young Black men when making traffic stops.

Carol Tator and Frances Henry. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006

Carol Tator and Frances Henry. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006. The Star series generated a heated debate over this issue between the Toronto police authorities, authors of the newspaper articles (and the Star as an institution), and local authorities.

Frances Henry of York University, Toronto with expertise in Qualitative . Racial profiling in Canada: Challenging the myth of ‘a few bad apples’.

Racial profiling in Canada: Challenging the myth of ‘a few bad apples’.

Tator, . and F. Henry. Racial Profiling in Canada: Challenging the Myth of a Few Bad Apples. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Winter, J. and R. Cribb. RCMP acknowledges using phone trackers to collect Canadians’ cellular details’. Toronto Star, April . oogle Scholar. Authors and Affiliations.

Racial Profiling in Canada : Challenging the Myth of a 'Few Bad Apples'. by Carol Tator and Frances Henry. The articles drew strong reactions from the community, and considerable protest from the media, politicians, law enforcement officials, and other public authorities.

Racial Profiling In Canada: Challenging The Myth Of A Few Bad Apples. This book on racial profiling begins with a story. Discourses Of Domination. Challenging Racism In The Arts. He Had the Power: Pa Neezer, the Orisha King of Trinidad. The narrative of "Peter Owusu-Ansah's Nightmare", written by Carol Goar appeared in the Toronto Star on August 15, 2004. His story is repeated daily on the streets of Toronto and in towns and cities across Canada These stories provide a huge body of evidence that challenge the dominant narratives of White authorities that racial profiling does not exist.

Tator, Carol & Frances Henry. Chapter 3, pp. 55-58 & pp. 71-91. Recommended: Bahdi, Reem. No Exit: Racial Profiling and Canada's War Against Terrorism. Osgoode Hall Law Journal 41:293-317. Movie American History X Viewing: 14:35 – 16:30 pm, 04/6/2018 Location: TBA Responses due: 5 pm, 04/12/2018 Alternate movie for students who have requested and been granted exemption from watching American History X by instructor.

In October 2002, the Toronto Star ran a series of feature articles on racial profiling in which it was indicated that Toronto police routinely target young Black men when making traffic stops. The articles drew strong reactions from the community, and considerable protest from the media, politicians, law enforcement officials, and other public authorities. Although the articles were supported by substantial documentation and statistical evidence, the Toronto Police Association sued the Star, claiming that no such evidence existed. The lawsuit was ultimately rejected in court. As a result, however, the issue of racial profiling - a practice in which certain criminal activities are attributed to individuals or groups on the basis of race or ethno-racial background - was thrust into the national spotlight.

In this comprehensive and thought-provoking work, Carol Tator and Frances Henry explore the meaning of racial profiling in Canada as it is practised not only by the police but also by many other social institutions. The authors provide a theoretical framework within which they examine racial profiling from a number of perspectives and in a variety of situations. They analyse the discourses of the media, policing officials, politicians, civil servants, judges, and other public authorities to demonstrate how those in power communicate and produce existing racialized ideologies and social relations of inequality through their common interactions. Chapter 3, by contributing author Charles Smith, provides a comparison of experiences of racial profiling and policing in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Chapter 7, by Maureen Brown, through a series of interviews, presents stories that demonstrate the realities of racial profiling in the everyday experiences of Afro-Canadians and ethno-racial minorities.

Informed by a wealth of research and theoretical approaches from a wide range of disciplines, Racial Profiling in Canada makes a major contribution to the literature and debates on a topic of growing concern. Together the authors present a compelling examination of the pervasiveness of racial profiling in daily life and its impact on our society, while suggesting directions for change.