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eBook Congress: The Electoral Connection, Second Edition download

by David R. Mayhew

eBook Congress: The Electoral Connection, Second Edition download ISBN: 0300105878
Author: David R. Mayhew
Publisher: Yale University Press; 2 edition (November 10, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 216
ePub: 1938 kb
Fb2: 1641 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mobi docx mobi mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Any short list of major analyses of Congress must of necessity include David Mayhew’s Congress: The Electoral Connection.

Any short list of major analyses of Congress must of necessity include David Mayhew’s Congress: The Electoral Connection. It is a pleasure to have this aged-in-the cask classic reissued, and the foreword by Arnold and preface by Mayhew are a valuable bonus. Mayhew's book on Congress seems to be the best thing on the subject.

In this welcome updating of his agenda-setting classic, David Mayhew cogently defends his original methodology and finds that divided government remains no less productive of important legislation than unified government. Written with Mayhew’s usual clarity and grace, this is a book to be enjoyed by beginning and veteran students of Congress alike. Gary Jacobson, professor of political science, University of California, San Diego.

Mayhew's book on Congress is considered a classic of political science literature

Mayhew's book on Congress is considered a classic of political science literature. It's short (under 200 pages), and though in some ways it has become dated, it still goes a long way toward explaining the primary goals and activities of Congress-people.

Congress: The Electoral Connection is a book by David Mayhew that applies rational choice theory to the actions of American Congressmen. Mayhew argues that Congressmen are motivated by re-election

Congress: The Electoral Connection is a book by David Mayhew that applies rational choice theory to the actions of American Congressmen. Mayhew argues that Congressmen are motivated by re-election. Mayhew uses pieces from Anthony Downs's and Richard Fenno's works to build his own argument and present his own rational choice model for members of Congress. Mayhew claims that the book is theoretical; it pursues an argument and considers the implications for exploratory purposes.

The book also contains a new preface by the author. Any short list of major analyses of Congress must of necessity include David Mayhew’s Congress: The Electoral Connection.

Find all the study resources for Congress : The Electoral Connection by David R. Mayhew.

Find all the study resources for Congress : The Electoral Connection by David R. Congress : The Electoral Connection.

David R. Mayhew (born May 18, 1937) is a political scientist and Sterling Professor in the Political Science Department at Yale University. He is the author of eight influential books on American politics, and is widely considered one of the leading scholars on the American Congress. Mayhew has been a member of the Yale faculty since 1968. He has also taught at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst College, Oxford University, and Harvard University.

Bibliographic information.

References to this book. Congress: The Electoral Connection Volume 26 of Yale studies in political science. Yale University Press, 1974. 0300130015, 9780300130010.

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Comments: (7)
Gashakar
I was looking for a book about Congress & how elections play a role in their decision making (or lack thereof). This book is about Congress & how elections play a role in their decision making (or lack thereof). I think I may have succeeded.
Thundershaper
Book was needed for Poly Sci class on Congress. It was a very good and informative read on how American legislature works. Would recommend as an easy read for anyone taking a class on congress or interested in reading up on how Congress functions.
Micelhorav
Great
MilsoN
I would recommend this product to others because it was a very interesting read so far and helps you to learn more
Broadraven
I had to read this book for my political science class and it was very informative on what drives politicians to seek and retain office. However, the language was hard to understand and I was highly bored reading this.
Malarad
The goals of individual congressmen have a significant impact on the quality and power of Congress as an institution. The exact role of Congress is a much debated issue but it can be safely stated that at a minimum, Congress is to make quality public policy, which in aggregate, benefits the nation as a whole. The extent to which this is achieved is in large part dependent on the willingness and ability of Congress as a collection of individual goals and desires to strive toward this end.
David Mayhew assessed that the main goal of congressmen was to gain re-election. In this never ending quest for popular support, the legislative and oversight duties of congressmen takes a back seat to advertising, credit claiming and position taking. In other words, Congress' vast resources are expended in allocating benefits to small constituencies and not toward responsible, cohesive and nationally oriented public policy. Staff and office material are used for keeping in touch with constituents and casework. Committees are platforms for position taking and pork barrel politics. And parties and party leaders focus on doling out favors, setting agendas and protecting the habits and routine of the organization. This results in delay, narrow policies directed at small segments of the population, a tendency to favor the legislative preferences of organized constituencies, especially those with a proven power to deliver money, manpower and votes, and finally symbolism. The end product is poor public policy with little cohesion and direction.
Mayhew's assessment of what drives individual members of Congress could be debated. But his conclusion that the policy making is fragmented and disjointed is difficult to argue with.
Nicearad
David Mayhew's Congress: The Electoral Connection examines the activities of the individuals and the specifics of the institutions of the US House of Representatives, in an effort to determine the primary goals of House members elected to serve America and their constituents in the House. The thinking is that understanding House members' motivations better will allow observers to predict their actions.

He's well qualified to address this topic, having taught at Yale on political and legislative institutions since 1968.

Mayhew concludes that the main motivation behind what United States Congressmen say and do is not the best interests of the folks back home or even the well-being of their country - they are mainly concerned with their own reelection. In fact, he goes further, dismissing the idea that reelection is one of many motivations of Congressmen, saying that they are "...indeed, in their role [in Washington] as abstractions, interested in nothing else." He goes on in this book to display evidence, in the name of activities of Congresspeople and the policies and institutions of the House of Representatives, that supports his thesis well.

Don't be dismissed by the book's brevity and breezy tone. It's packed with insight and supportive data. And, don't think that this 1974 book is irrelevant to today's Congress. The themes and pressures ring true to today's world.

The conclusions are disheartening to those of us hoping for more from our elected leaders, but Mayhew's tone isn't cynical, just factual. Congress: The Electoral Connection is a foundation on which a library of research has been conducted on US political institutions. Political science students and those interested in how the direction of our country is set should read it.