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eBook Get out, Explore, and Have Fun!: How Families of Children with Autism or Asperger Syndrome Can Get the Most out of Community Activities download

by Lisa Jo Rudy

eBook Get out, Explore, and Have Fun!: How Families of Children with Autism or Asperger Syndrome Can Get the Most out of Community Activities download ISBN: 1849058091
Author: Lisa Jo Rudy
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers; 1 edition (June 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1449 kb
Fb2: 1967 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf lrf rtf mobi
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Many families with a child with autism or Asperger Syndrome feel that involvement in the community is not for them.

Many families with a child with autism or Asperger Syndrome feel that involvement in the community is not for them. As the parent of an 18 year old autistic son who has gotten out there, explored, and had fun, I can say that Lisa has done an excellent job compiling not only lists of possible activities, but the good and potential bad of each as well as tips on how to make sure the experiences are valuable ones.

Many families with a child with autism or Asperger Syndrome feel that involvement in the community is not for them

Many families with a child with autism or Asperger Syndrome feel that involvement in the community is not for them. Since 2006, she has been the 'About. com Guide to Autism' (ww. utism. com), a part of The New York Times Company.

Lisa Jo Rudy, author of Get out, Explore, and Have Fun! How Families of Children with Autism or Asperger Syndrome Can Get the Most out of Community Activities and writer for ww. utismafter16. com and ww. uthenticinclusion. Giving or attending parties with a child on the autistic spectrum can be immensely challenging, and what should be fun for both of you can end up in distress and chaos

Find out more about Jeanette's incredible journey in her book,,i Finding a. .

Find out more about Jeanette's incredible journey in her book,,i Finding a Different Kind of Normal: Misadventures with Asperger Syndrome.

63 Fun Questions to Get Your Kid Talking Around age 7, a child with Asperger's usually becomes aware that he is.Interests include building things out of Legos, paper, sand, and wood or just about anything they can find. Nick: I like building things.

63 Fun Questions to Get Your Kid Talking. Children ask questions-lots of questions. Around age 7, a child with Asperger's usually becomes aware that he is "different" from the other kids in the class. It took me six weeks to build a paper city because I kept getting new ideas.

Autism Facts and Figures. You’ve gotten the help your child needs. No matter how exhausted you are, get your child out in the community. A salute to mothers of children with autism. Autism Speaks does not provide medical or legal advice or services. Learn about Screening. And perhaps as you’re enjoying a latte (which I hope you are, you deserve it), you wonder what’s next. First of all, make sure you savor the moment. It was a struggle with us with Justin (I have the tiny little bitemarks on my body to prove it) but getting him out so he could have a repertoire of leisure activities was crucial to his happiness and to our family’s.

Asperger syndrome is a form of autism. How Asperger syndrome is diagnosed. The problematic history of Hans Asperger. Autism, including Asperger syndrome, is much more common than most people think. People with Asperger syndrome may find difficulty in social relationships and in communicating.

I have a child with classic autism, another with Asperger’s and a third with . Educate yourself about autism (or whatever other difficulties the child may have). Do not be judgy about your friend's parenting.

I have a child with classic autism, another with Asperger’s and a third with learning difficulties. Having a friend to support you can be invaluable. She may need you to help explore what local services can offer in the way of respite care. 7. As the child grows older, their differences may become more apparent. Respect the knowledge they have about their child.

Summer vacation can be difficult for some children on the autism spectrum. Here are some tips on how parents can help their child deal with transitions related to summertime activities. Комментарии отключены. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Get Out, Explore, and Have Fun! : How Families of Children with Autism Or Asperger Syndrome Can Get the Most Out of Community Activities. Yazar:: Rudy, Lisa Jo. Baskı/Yayın Bilgisi: (2010). Relationship Development Intervention with Young Children : Social and Emotional Development Activities for Asperger Syndrome, Autism, PDD and NLD. Yazar:: Gutstein, Steven E. Baskı/Yayın Bilgisi: (2002).

Many families with a child with autism or Asperger Syndrome feel that involvement in the community is not for them. This book sets out to change that, with a rich and varied menu of suggestions for how such families can take full part in community life and support the strengths and interests of their child at the same time. Informal learning experiences can be the key to self-discovery, communication, self-confidence, and even independence for many children on the autism spectrum. Only outside the four walls of school will your child truly discover their own passions, abilities, and social peers.

Get Out, Explore, and Have Fun is a guide to what's out there, how to find it, and how to make it work for your family. The book includes hints and tips for involving your family in the right community activities, from sport to science; information on museums, arts organizations and science institutions as venues for an enjoyable and enriching day out for the family; and resources and ideas for helping your child build on their strengths, interests, and preferred learning styles to explore life in the community. Handouts about autism are included, as well as handouts suggesting ways in which organisations and institutions can successfully include young people with autism in their activities.

This book will open the door to community inclusion, creative exploration, and social learning.

Comments: (7)
Watikalate
Lisa Jo Rudy gives some practical ways to be involved in the community. Her suggestions not only are helpful now, but they are also helpful in planning for the future. Her wisdom can be used to empower kids with special needs to grow into adults who are at home in their communities.
Modigas
A little background is in order. I have a 10 yr old son with Autism. He was born with a chromosomal deletion (8p23.1) that can cause severe behavioral issues. He also has some physical challenges. In the beginning we were too busy, bluntly, keeping him alive to worry about getting out--in fact the first two years we were on quarantine keeping him in to keep germs and sickness out. Then when we were medically out of the woods more his behaviors became so challenging we (like the author of this book) had him kicked out of every preschool he attended. By age 5 he was in a lock down psych ward -- and we were being told he would need to be institutionalized for the remainder of his life. They gave him so many labels we couldn't keep them straight. We had people in and out of our lives constantly -- leaving us with no privacy, no sense of family, and little sense of hope. Enter a nurse from the ward who took me aside and told me she thought my son might be autistic (not bipolar, ADHD, depressed, or any other of the things all the Doctor's wanted to dx him with) and encouraged us to take him to the regional center for evaluation. Turns out that was correct and we finally turned the corner.

I say this because if this book can be applied to my situation, where my sons history included behaviors like severe perseveration, violence, and limited food choices (amongst many other things), it can apply to nearly anybody's situation with an autistic kid. Really.

The author starts by addressing many of the common issues/thoughts/ideas that come up when you are the parent of an autistic kid. From ignorance to fear to guilt it's covered. For me and my family most of our thought centers on behavior -- how will my son behave? What will they think of me in light of his behavior? The author not only deals with this issue but promptly states that there will be times when things don't go well. Toughen up mom. Keep trying. That's a message that is good for me to hear. It is all too easy to sit in the apartment and handle my son doing things he likes to do and take a break from the world. She does not come across as preachy either.

I very much appreciated the author's guilt free way to get this across. I don't know how other parents feel but I feel guilty. Since my son was little just getting through the day was a major challenge. As he got older and his behaviors a bit better we ventured out a little but even a trip to Target is fraught with problems - he could run (he's an escape artist) or push someone or just melt down. Taking him anywhere is just so challenging that the effort hardly seems worth it. Yet I would like to give him some of the same opportunities other kids have. Let's not even speak about the way this affects his NT (normal) sister who, like the authors daughter, is very close to her brother.

In Get Out, Explore, and Have Fun! the author provides fairly detailed information about many types of outings. Sports, museums, performing arts, social clubs, camps, and more. Each chapter provides a really well done encapsulation of the type of outing, challenges, resources, who it might be appropriate for and some real world family stories (often her own) as well as all sorts of hints and tips. She includes a couple of chapters for how to present inclusion to the groups or outing locations including sample proposals. There is also a resource section in the back.

For those of you who understand acronyms like ABA, RDI, etc she used Greenspan's floortime with her son and she also mentions Garnder's multiple intelligences and Gray's social stories. These will all be familiar things if you have done any amount of research into Autism and Aspergers.

So what's my plan? My daughter is very into drama and theatre. Since my son loves TV and movies I decided that this would be the chapter we would work on first (my son hates sports and is not very good at them and really struggles with making friends). After going through the chapter we (my daughter and I) decided we will go to a play. The author mentions you can be a participant or an observer. We'll start with observation. We're very excited and I feel better prepared for this to be successful yet grounded in a realism that not everything is going to work.

The next outing will be natural world. We live near a canyon and that should be a great place to start exploring. My son hates sand so even though we are by the ocean we seldom venture that way. I do wish the author had included more about the natural world outside of camp though. Much of the info in that chapter is camp related but we have a wide variety of options locally that are not camp's like horseback riding, ranches, pretend digs, local lake's, etc. Some of these things are not only natural world though so I'll use the other chapters to assist.

And that's the point. Whether or not we are successful we tried. I think that is the overall message in this book. Jessica Kingsley publisher is, in my opinion, the top Autism and Aspergers book company. This book is just as excellent as their others. In a world where so many of the resources on ASD kids centers on the TYPE of therapy you should do (including pro's and con's) we really needed a great book like this written at a parent's level. It's realistic, easy to read and reference, and comes at the topic from a practical bent. It is absolutely worth your time to pick up for your reference library. Do yourself a favor though and make sure it is prominently featured so you'll be encouraged to use it frequently!
Angana
The release of this book was a timely one for my family. My daughter has PDD-NOS on the autistic spectrum, and her learning specialist at school had just told us that she was ready to start getting out into the community more, and that it would help greatly building her sense of accomplishment and confidence.

I was hesitant. We have been to a few places such as the zoo or the children's museum without incident but if something was slightly different, it had set off a tantrum of epic levels. After reading this book, I felt more at ease and ready to try again. It contains several activities that are more suited to an autistic child, including sports that are non-competitive and provide a way to help build muscle endurance and stamina which in turn can help with motor skill issues. She gives tip sheets that you can provide to the leader of the activity and suggestions for helping your child adjust to the new activity.

Most importantly, I love the attitude of the book, which is that you have to try. You may have to try a few things before you find the fit, and most importantly you have to participate at first too. Eventually you may be able to drop your child off, but for very social activities such as boy scouts, you will most likely have to heavily participate.

We have tried several things since reading the book including soccer, ice skating, and more trips to the playground. Soccer was a no go for now since the coordination needs some work on my daughter's part, but ice skating has worked wonders. After only 3 trips she is able to balance on her own for at least 10 minutes at a time and she is really enjoying it. Next we will be looking for a religious community using the tips in the book as I have missed that the most.

If you have a child on the spectrum and have felt ostracized because of it, this book is worth getting for help on finding new places for you and your child to enjoy.
Mustard Forgotten
This book is fairly well-researched, and the author offers many specific of how to deal with different concerns in different situations. I don't find this book really useful for my own situation... first of all my kids are not really on the disabling end of the spectrum, more just socially challenged and easily stressed. So I don't really have to prepare for events quite as thoroughly as this author suggests. Also since I tend to be similar my kids in some ways, we naturally are attracted to the same settings and situations.

I guess I don't really need a book about what works for my kids. This book would be a difficult topic to write about. Different people have different struggles and different preferences, even if they have the same diagnosis. Also many of the things the author suggests seem like they should be obvious to any parent of a child on the spectrum--yes, individual sports are perhaps preferable to team sports.

I do like the many photos of real-life kids involved in programs, accompanied by real success stories.