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eBook Rules for Reasoning download

by Richard E. Nisbett

eBook Rules for Reasoning download ISBN: 0805812563
Author: Richard E. Nisbett
Publisher: Psychology Press (January 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 432
ePub: 1755 kb
Fb2: 1577 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr lrf txt lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

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This book examines two questions: Do people make use of abstract rules such as logical and statistical rules when making inferences in everyday life? Can such abstract rules be changed by training? Contrary to the spirit of reductionist theories from.

This book examines two questions: Do people make use of abstract rules such as logical and statistical rules when making inferences in everyday life? Can such abstract rules be changed by training? Contrary to the spirit of reductionist theories from behaviorism to connectionism, there is ample evidence that people do make use of abstract rules of inference - including rules of logic, statistics, causal deduction, and cost-benefit analysis. Such rules, moreover, are easily alterable by instruction as it occurs in classrooms and in brief laboratory training sessions.

Richard Eugene Nisbett (born 1941) is an American social psychologist and writer

Richard Eugene Nisbett (born 1941) is an American social psychologist and writer. He is the Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished Professor of social psychology and co-director of the Culture and Cognition program at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. from Columbia University, where his advisor was Stanley Schachter, whose other students at that time included Lee Ross and Judith Rodin.

Rules for Reasoning book.

This book examines two questions: Do people make use of abstract rules such as logical and statistical rules when making inferences in everyday life? Can such abstract rules be changed by training? Contrary to the spirit of reductionist theories from behaviorism to connectionism, there is ample evidence that people do make use of abstract rules of inference - including rules of logic, statistics, causal deduction, and cost-benefit analysis.

By Richard E. Nisbett. This book examines two questions: Do people make use of abstract rules such as logical and statistical rules when making inferences in everyday life?

By Richard E. By Richard E.

More by Richard E.

This book examines two questions: Do people make use of abstract rules such as logical and statistical rules when making inferences in everyday life? Can such abstract rules be changed by training? Contrary to the spirit of reductionist theories from behaviorism to connectionism, there is ample evidence that people do make use of abstract rules of inference -- including rules of logic, statistics, causal deduction, and cost-benefit analysis. Such rules, moreover, are easily alterable by instruction as it occurs in classrooms and in brief laboratory training sessions. The fact that purely formal training can alter them and that those taught in one content domain can "escape" to a quite different domain for which they are also highly applicable shows that the rules are highly abstract. The major implication for cognitive science is that people are capable of operating with abstract rules even for concrete, mundane tasks; therefore, any realistic model of human inferential capacity must reflect this fact. The major implication for education is that people can be far more broadly influenced by training than is generally supposed. At high levels of formality and abstraction, relatively brief training can alter the nature of problem-solving for an infinite number of content domains.
Comments: (2)
Invissibale
This is a much overlooked collection of experiments testing whether decision making can be improved. While old, it contains many useful and classic studies. A must for folks interested in reducing decision making biases (debiasing) through training.
Mezilabar
Good.