carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Caring for the 'Holy Land': Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel (EASA Series)

eBook Caring for the 'Holy Land': Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel (EASA Series) download

by Claudia Liebelt

eBook Caring for the 'Holy Land': Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel (EASA Series) download ISBN: 0857452614
Author: Claudia Liebelt
Publisher: Berghahn Books; 1 edition (November 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 228
ePub: 1867 kb
Fb2: 1342 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw lit mbr lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

New York: Berghahn, 2011.

Explores how the entry of migrant workers into Israel raises questions beyond just those of the labor market. Explores how the entry of migrant workers into Israel raises questions beyond just those of the labor market.

Claudia Liebelt The theme of this book is Filipina¹ migrants employed in providing care to the elderly and doing domestic work in Israel.

In the literature, migrant domestic workers are often described as being subject to racial discrimination, labour exploitation and exclusion from mainstream society. The theme of this book is Filipina¹ migrants employed in providing care to the elderly and doing domestic work in Israel.

In Israel, as in numerous countries of the global North, Filipina migrant women have been recruited in large numbers for domestic work, typically as live-in caregivers for the elderly.

The case of Israel is unique in that the country has a special significance as the ‘Holy Land’ for the predominantly .

The case of Israel is unique in that the country has a special significance as the ‘Holy Land’ for the predominantly devout Christian Filipina women and is at the center of an often violent conflict, which affects Filipinos in many ways. In the literature, migrant domestic workers are often described as being subject to racial discrimination, labour exploitation and exclusion from mainstream society.

Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel. New York, Oxford, Berghahn Books, 228 . 12 illustr. Published: 1 January 2017. by Consortium Erudit. in Anthropologie et Sociétés. Anthropologie et Sociétés, Volume 41; doi:10.

Caring for the Holy Land : Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel. Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. New York: Ballantine Books. Oxford and New York: Berghahn. Malinowski, Bronislaw. The Gender of the Gift: Problems with Women and Problems with Society in Melanesia.

CARING FOR THE ‘HOLY LAND’ Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel Claudia Liebelt. 5. FRACTURING RESEMBLANCES Identity and Mimetic Conflict in Melanesia and the West Simon Harrison.

The EASA book series publishes works in English that address worthwhile questions in a cogent, persuasive and fluent wa. Liebelt, Claudia 2011. Caring for the 'Holy Land': Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel. Fedele, Anna and Ruy Llera Blanes (eds) 2011.

The EASA book series publishes works in English that address worthwhile questions in a cogent, persuasive and fluent way. Manuscripts must not be under consideration by any other publisher. com, who will advise about the specific material needed, and offer informal advice about how a proposal can be strengthened.

In Israel, as in numerous countries of the global North, Filipina women have been recruited in large numbers for domestic work, typically as live-in caregivers for the elderly. The case of Israel is unique in that the country has a special significance as the ‘Holy Land’ for the predominantly devout Christian Filipina women and is at the center of an often violent conflict, which affects Filipinos in many ways. In the literature, migrant domestic workers are often described as being subject to racial discrimination, labour exploitation and exclusion from mainstream society. Here, the author provides a more nuanced account and shows how Filipina caregivers in Israel have succeeded in creating their own collective spaces, as well as negotiating rights and belonging. While maintaining transnational ties and engaging in border-crossing journeys, these women seek to fulfill their dreams of a better life. During this process, new socialities and subjectivities emerge that point to a form of global citizenship in the making, consisting of greater social, economic and political rights within a highly gendered and racialized global economy.