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eBook The Constitution of Vietnam (Constitutional Systems of the World) download

by Mark Sidel

eBook The Constitution of Vietnam (Constitutional Systems of the World) download ISBN: 1841137391
Author: Mark Sidel
Publisher: Hart Publishing (August 28, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 236
ePub: 1642 kb
Fb2: 1380 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf rtf txt docx
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

In this book Mark Sidel, a renowned legal scholar in Vietnam, has successfully addressed . In these types of books, there is always a risk that the book becomes simply a summary of the constitution with little analysis.

In this book Mark Sidel, a renowned legal scholar in Vietnam, has successfully addressed this omission by presenting a rich and absorbing analysis of constitutional change. This book comes highly recommended as a history of constitutional change in Vietnam; it also provides important insights into the future direction of constitutional reform. It will be of use to both legal and Asian studies students and scholars. The first few chapters, which discuss the past constitutions, fall into this trap.

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The Constitution of Vietnam book. Constitutional Systems of the World (1 - 10 of 18 books). Start by marking The Constitution of Vietnam: A Contextual Analysis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Other books in the series. Mor. rivia About The Constitution.

The Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnamese: Hiến pháp nước Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam) is the current constitution of Vietnam, adopted on 28 November 2013 by the Thirteenth National Assembly, and took effect on 1 Januar.

The Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnamese: Hiến pháp nước Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam) is the current constitution of Vietnam, adopted on 28 November 2013 by the Thirteenth National Assembly, and took effect on 1 January 2014. It is the fourth constitution adopted by the Vietnamese government since the political reunification of the country in 1976. The current constitution, known as the 2013 Constitution, contains a preamble and 11 chapters: Chapter I: Political System.

It is organised around wo themes: first, the US Constitution is old, short, and difficult to amend. Second, the Constitution creates a structure of political opportunities that allows political actors, icluding political parties, to pursue the preferred policy goals even to the point of altering the very structure of politics.

Mark Sidel, The Constitution of Vietnam: A Contextual Analysis, Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2009. Mark Sidel, Law and Society in Vietnam, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. To Van-Hoa, Judicial Independence, Lund: Jurisförlaget i Lund, 2006. The 1959 Constitution. Bernard Fall, North Viet-Nam’s New Draft Constitution, 32:2 Pacific Affairs 178 (1959). Bernard Fall, North Viet-Nam’s Constitution and Government, 33:3 Pacific Affairs 282 (1960).

The Constitution of the United States established America’s national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens. It was signed on September 17, 1787, by delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Under America’s first governing document, the Articles of Confederation, the national government was weak and states operated like independent countries.

Part of the Constitutional Systems of the World Series).

by Professor Mark Tushnet. series Constitutional Systems of the World

by Professor Mark Tushnet. series Constitutional Systems of the World. This book provides a critical introduction to the history and current meaning of the United States' Constitution. It is organised around two themes: Firstly, the US Constitution is old, short, and difficult to amend. Secondly, the Constitution creates a structure of political opportunities that allows political actors, including political parties, to pursue the preferred policy goals even to the point of altering the very structure of politics. Politics, that is, often gives meaning to the Constitution.

This new book examines constitutional debate and development in one of the most dynamic and rapidly changing societies in Asia, and will be of use to scholars and students of comparative law, comparative constitutional law and Asian law, and practitioners interested in Asia or in Vietnam. The book discusses and analyses the historical development, principles, doctrines and debates which comprise and shape Vietnamese constitutional law today, during a time of reform and debate. The chapters are written in sufficient detail for anyone coming to the subject for the first time to develop a clear and informed view of how the constitution is arranged, how it works, and the main points of debate on it in Vietnamese society. It is written in an accessible style, with an emphasis on clarity and concision.The book discusses and analyses the origins of Vietnamese constitutional thought; the first (1946) Constitution of independent Vietnam; Constitutional dialogue and debate in the late 1940s and 1950s, including the work of dissidents in the 1950s; the 1959 Vietnamese Constitution; constitutional dialogue and debate in the 1960s and 1970s; the 1980 Constitution; the rise of doi moi (renovation) and debates over constitutionalism in the 1980s; the 1992 Constitution, including the role of legislative, executive and judicial sectors, constitutional power and enforcement, constitutional rights and obligations, and other issues; constitutional dialogue and debate in the 1990s; the constitutional debate and revision process of 2001 and the current Vietnamese Constitution the rise of debate over judicial independence and constitutional enforcement and review in Vietnam; comparison to constitutional developments and debates in China; constitutions and constitutional issue in the former South Vietnam; the links and tensions between state and party constitutions; and concluding analysis of 60 years of the development of Vietnam's Constitution and constitutionalism.
Comments: (2)
Hanelynai
In these types of books, there is always a risk that the book becomes simply a summary of the constitution with little analysis. The first few chapters, which discuss the past constitutions, fall into this trap. In fact, one might be better off reading the constitutions themselves rather than reading a prose version of them.

The real pleasure of this book is its discussion of the Vietnamese debates and scholarship on constitutionalism. Sidel seems very plugged into this literature and makes it accessible to foreigners. Moreover, he highlights several interesting issues, such as the debate over a constitutional court, that are simply remarkable for a socialist country. The book is worth reading for these last few chapters alone.

Unfortunately, the publisher seems to have difficulty with this book. Amazon seems to run out frequently. It's also rather expensive for such a short book, and covers much of the same ground as Sidel's Law and Society in Vietnam: The Transition from Socialism in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge Studies in Law and Society). I highly recommend this book if you're unfamiliar with Sidel's other works and are interested in constitutional law - otherwise, if you can't get it, try his other works.

Recommended for comparative constitutional law and Vietnamese politics scholars.
Ucantia
Sidel's volume provides good information on the contents of Vietnam's various constitutions, and places each iteration in historical perspective. The difficulties of squaring constitutional text with party supremacy are made clear. This book is great as a starting point for comparative constitutional scholarship that includes Vietnam, in that it identifies key debates that would warrant the study of other sources.

It gets three stars because a) it doesn't delve deeply enough into the different interests involved in the process of writing and amending each constitution (perhaps this sort of information was not recorded or was not open to Western scholars at the time of writing, so this can perhaps be forgiven), and b) it sometimes reads like a laundry list. Still a useful sourcebook for someone new to the topic! Maybe his Law and Society in Vietnam has more of the political-economy stuff that I'm looking for.