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by Gareth Evans

eBook The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All download ISBN: 0815703341
Author: Gareth Evans
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press (September 4, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 349
ePub: 1146 kb
Fb2: 1521 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt azw lrf lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Social Sciences

Gareth Evans's book is a passionate, lucidly argued, and immensely well-informed guide to how the world can do. .Gareth Evans, one of the principal creators of the Responsibility to Protect, has written the first major work on this noble, important, and elusive concept.

Gareth Evans's book is a passionate, lucidly argued, and immensely well-informed guide to how the world can do better. Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town. Anyone interested in international affairs should read this book on what is certain to be a continuing debate. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, . Permanent Representative to the United Nations,1999–2001.

The Responsibility to Protect captures a simple and powerful idea. The primary responsibility for protecting its own people from mass atrocity crimes lies with the state itself. State sovereignty implies responsibility, not a license to kill

The Responsibility to Protect captures a simple and powerful idea. State sovereignty implies responsibility, not a license to kill. But when a state is unwilling or unable to halt or avert such crimes, the wider international community then has a collective responsibility to take whatever action is necessary

The book has elements of a diplomatic memoir, briefly describing the arc of Evans’.

The book has elements of a diplomatic memoir, briefly describing the arc of Evans’. career beginning as a young civil society activist, politician, foreign minister and now. again as a rather older civil society activist as president, until June 2009, of. International Crisis Group. p223) Unusually for the genre, there is little settling of scores. Though the title aim of ending mass atrocity once and for all is admirable, responsibility to protect - the doctrine and the book - will assuredly not guarantee that. future Rwandas (or Kosovos, or Iraqs) do not take place. Yet it does offer a vocabulary. But when a state is unwilling or unable to halt or avert such crimes, the wider international community then has a collective responsibility to take whatever action is necessary

The Responsibility to Protect book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Responsibility to Protect book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Gareth Evans’s direct involvement in the trajectory of R2P started with his role as co-chair of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS), which released The Responsibility to Protect report in December 2001

Gareth Evans’s direct involvement in the trajectory of R2P started with his role as co-chair of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS), which released The Responsibility to Protect report in December 2001.

Keywords: Responsibility to Protect. com/abstract 1482949.

The Responsibility to Protect - Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and for . Gareth Evans’s book is a passionate, lucidly argued and immensely well informed guide to how the world can do better.

Gareth Evans has been president and CEO of the International Crisis Group since 2000 and was foreign minister of Australia from 1988 to1996. Co-chair of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (2000-01), which initiated the Responsibility to Protect concept, he has since led the movement for its worldwide adoption and application.

Yet genocide, ethnic cleansing, and other mass atrocity crimes continue to shoc. Gareth Evans has grappled with these issues firsthand. As Australian foreign minister, he was a key broker of the United Nations peace plan for Cambodia. As president of the International Crisis Group, he now works on the prevention and resolution of scores of conflicts and crises worldwide. The primary architect of and leading authority on the Responsibility to Protect ("R2P"), he shows here how this new international norm can once and for all prevent a return to the killing fields. The Responsibility to Protectcaptures a simple and powerful idea.

The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All. By Gareth Evans. The notion of a responsibility to protect is still widely debated, and Evans is at pains to point out the misconceptions of its opponents. He stresses that the doctrine is aimed primarily at establishing not a normative foundation for coercive military intervention but rather a sustained commitment by the international community to work with weak states to prevent the outbreak of mass atrocities.

"Never again!" the world has vowed time and again since the Holocaust. Yet genocide, ethnic cleansing, and other mass atrocity crimes continue to shock our consciences—from the killing fields of Cambodia to the machetes of Rwanda to the agony of Darfur.

Gareth Evans has grappled with these issues firsthand. As Australian foreign minister, he was a key broker of the United Nations peace plan for Cambodia. As president of the International Crisis Group, he now works on the prevention and resolution of scores of conflicts and crises worldwide. The primary architect of and leading authority on the Responsibility to Protect ("R2P"), he shows here how this new international norm can once and for all prevent a return to the killing fields.

The Responsibility to Protect captures a simple and powerful idea. The primary responsibility for protecting its own people from mass atrocity crimes lies with the state itself. State sovereignty implies responsibility, not a license to kill. But when a state is unwilling or unable to halt or avert such crimes, the wider international community then has a collective responsibility to take whatever action is necessary. R2P emphasizes preventive action above all. That includes assistance for states struggling to contain potential crises and for effective rebuilding after a crisis or conflict to tackle its underlying causes. R2P's primary tools are persuasion and support, not military or other coercion. But sometimes it is right to fight: faced with another Rwanda, the world cannot just stand by.

R2P was unanimously adopted by the UN General Assembly at the 2005 World Summit. But many misunderstandings persist about its scope and limits. And much remains to be done to solidify political support and to build institutional capacity. Evans shows, compellingly, how big a break R2P represents from the past, and how, with its acceptance in principle and effective application in practice, the promise of "Never again!" can at last become a reality.

Comments: (4)
Nalme
Mass atrocity crimes have been part of human history for many, many years. After the experiences of the Second World War, the world had vowed never again. Unfortunately despite that pledge, it was not able to live up to it, with various mass atrocity crimes occurring around the world until just recently. Mass atrocity crimes such as the Rwandan genocide have shaken the world into action. One of the main blockages to intervention has been the uncertainty due to the notion of state sovereignty.

After the various experiences of mass atrocity crimes in recent times, the UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, made this matter an issue at the 2000 Millenium meeting of the UN General Assembly. The cause has gained momentum since then.

Former Australian Foreign Minister and recently retired Chairman of the International Crisis Group, Gareth Evans, has also taken up the cause of the question of the responsibility to protect, or R2P as it is commonly known.

This book examines R2P in the context of intervening when the rule of law collapses and innocent people are left to the mercies of various factions and non-state armed actors; some of whom become extremely violent and hostile to various ethnic groups. The book also contains many personal glimpses at various key players in R2P, experiences in dealing with the steadfast determination of those people to see that something positive would emerge from these initiatives and the need to intervene in another state's sovereign territory in order to protect the innocent.

An extremely well written and researched book, which contains a great deal of background information on the subject and various leading personalities who worked to overcome what was sometimes perceived as something too hard. The book is well referenced and extremely useful to the student or researcher of international relations, international law, human security and the workings of the United Nations in this matter. Well done Gareth Evans, good on you...!
heart of sky
Gareth Evans makes a gallant and generally successful effort to convince his readers that mass atrocities, genocide or ethnic cleansing can be stopped by intervention into and against the countries where they are happening or about to happen. While I disagree with many of his conclusions there is no question that he is sincere in thinking that crimes against humanity can be stopped or kept from starting and his commitment to bringing the story to the world must be applauded. He has long experience: foreign minister of Australia, high level UN official, CEO of the International Crisis Group. Evans thinks the nations of the world can act in concert when faced with mass slaughter and that they have already created the framework to do so, lacking only the political will and ability to see beyond their own narrow interests.

His--and everyone's--example is the Rwandan genocide of 1994, the unfortunate signature event in the history of humanitarian crises since the end of World War II. Every nation and international body that didn't intervene had their reasons although none of the reasons stand up against the fact of the massacre of 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu men, women and children during a three month rampage of blood lust. The United Nations had international troops already on the scene--and they were reporting to Kofi Annan, later Secretary General, at that time in charge of peacekeeping operations. The United States abdicated its role at the world's sole superpower--the memory of the disastrous mission to Somalia was too fresh in the minds of Bill Clinton and his advisers. Belgium, the former colonial power, turned its back on Rwanda.

Evans's premise is that such horrors can be halted before they start by a combination of political, legal, economic and diplomatic pressure and that military intervention would only be necessary if they fail. It involves international action before the killing starts in order to minimize horrors of mass atrocity and to keep military incursion as a last and rarely used resort. Again Rwanda is the example; only the ferocity and efficiency of the killing took anyone by surprise.

The difficulties in establishing a true responsibility to protect (R2P) citizens of a country no one's own are significant--I would argue they are overwhelming--and Evans doesn't try to diminish them. The first issue is state sovereignty. Evans thinks a system of limited sovereignty would be acceptable in the case of mass atrocity although there is little to support this idea, particularly when sovereignty and independence are among the only attributes that a state engaged in ethnic cleansing has. He thinks that the political leadership of countries in a position to intervene will do so even though they have refused in almost every case. Charges of neo-colonialism and neo-imperialism carry a great deal of weight when made by former colonies in Africa and Asia and have been effective in delaying initiatives particularly by their former colonial masters.

Evans writes well--he can even make the history of changes in UN resolutions sound interesting (or at least not dull)--and makes his arguments with every bit of moral and political persuasion he can muster which is quite a lot. But I disagree that the world has changed fundamentally in the past 25 years, that political leaders with myriad constituencies have become more altruistic and that we have decided to become our brother's keeper.

Many of the principals of the responsibility to protect seem derived from the Roman philosophical doctrine of jus ad bellum or just war. A key part of Catholic social teachings for centuries, the idea of just war has been accepted by most states and is ignored by just as many when it comes time to apply it.

This is an impassioned and beautifully written plea to our common humanity, one that Evans is particularly qualified to make.