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eBook A First Course in Computational Physics download

by Javier E. Hasbun,Paul L. DeVries

eBook A First Course in Computational Physics download ISBN: 076377314X
Author: Javier E. Hasbun,Paul L. DeVries
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning; 2 edition (March 12, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 433
ePub: 1833 kb
Fb2: 1431 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt lit lrf lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Science and Mathematics

This book is far beyond the level of an introductory course to the subject as the title of the book implies. This book is not what I expected. It's for students out to learn to write SOFTWARE that runs physics computations.

This book is far beyond the level of an introductory course to the subject as the title of the book implies. The examples are not easy to follow, and are not self paced. Had to use this book for a graduate class and I struggled a lot with it. This book would be much more useful as a reference or refresher for scientific computation experts, but not at all for students.

Written for physics and engineering students, this book covers the different types of computational problems using MATLAB with exercises . Paul L. DeVries, Miami University Javier E. Hasbun, University of West Georgia. Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011.

Written for physics and engineering students, this book covers the different types of computational problems using MATLAB with exercises developed around problems of physical interest.

This book fills that need. It demonstrates how numerical methods are used to solve the problems that physicists face. Chapters discuss different types of computational problems, with exercises developed around problems of physical interest. Within each chapter, students are lead from discussions of elementary problems and simple numerical approaches through derivations of more complex and sophisticated methods.

Paul L DeVries, Javier E Hasbun

Paul L DeVries, Javier E Hasbun. Computers and computation are extremely important components of physics and should be integral parts of a physicist's education. Intended for the physics and engineering students who have completed the introductory physics course, A First Course in Computational Physics, Computers and computation are extremely important components of physics and should be integral parts of a physicist's education.

Paul L. DeVries and Javier E. Hasbun, A First Course in Computational Physics, 2nd e. Jones and Bartlett (2010). Robert Ehrlich, Physics and Computers, Houghton Mifflin (1973).

References; Joel Franklin, Computational Methods for Physics, Cambridge University Press (2013). as LATeX,, Week 16; Discussing of students projects. Evaluation; AL Balqa Applied University Faculty of Science Department of Physics. Computational Physics 30201233. Textbook; Paul L. References; Joel Franklin, Computational Methods for Physics, Cambridge University Press (2013). Evaluation; 40% Midterm Exam, 10% project & activity (home work), 50% Final Exam.

A First Course In Computational Physics by Javier Hasbun and Paul Devries

A First Course In Computational Physics by Javier Hasbun and Paul Devries. 6. Computational Physics by J M Thijssen. 7. Computational Physics by Mark Newman. 8. Computational Physics: Problem Solving with Python by Rubin H Landau and Manuel J Páez. If any more book needs to be added to the list of best books on Computational Physics Subject, please let us know.

A First Course in Computational Physics by DeVries and Hasbun. Intended for the physics and engineering students who have completed introductory physics courses, this text covers the different types of computational problems using MATLAB. Topics such as root finding, Newton-Cotes integration, and ordinary differential equations are included and presented in the context of physics problems.

Computers and computation are extremely important components of physics and should be integral parts of a physicist s education. Furthermore, computation physics is reshaping the way calculations are made in all areas of physics. Intended for the physics and engineering students who have completed the introductory physics course, A First Course in Computational Physics, Second Edition covers the different types of computational problems using MATLAB with exercises developed around problems of physical interest. opics such as root finding, Newton-Cotes integration, and ordinary differential equations are included and presented in the context of physics problems. A few topics rarely seen at this level such as computerized tomography, are also included. Within each chapter, the student is led from relatively elementary problems and simple numerical approaches through derivations of more complex and sophisticated methods, often culminating in the solution to problems of significant difficulty. The goal is to demonstrate how numerical methods are used to solve the problems that physicists face.
Comments: (5)
Qiahmagha
This book is far beyond the level of an introductory course to the subject as the title of the book implies. The text assumes the reader is an expert programmer in different languages, and MATLAB is one of the languages the authors use extensively in the book. The examples are not easy to follow, and are not self paced. Had to use this book for a graduate class and I struggled a lot with it. This book would be much more useful as a reference or refresher for scientific computation experts, but not at all for students.
Alien
This book is not what I expected. It's for students out to learn to write SOFTWARE that runs physics computations. Did I return it? No. I have a grandson interested in learning to write software. I'll just give it to him. ( : > )
Vutaur
The book assumes you'll already an expert programmer in matlab. The examples are confusing and the sample code usually isn't helpful.
Anen
The book os complete. Well written and ilustrated.
The examples are easy to understamd and the applications cover a large area in Physics.
Jox
I am very disappointed with this book. It is not written for physics students, because there is no discussion on physics. And it's not written for a student learning how to code Matlab. I guess the intended audience are people who are very experienced with Matlab and who want to learn how to code physics problems?????? The only audience I can gather are computer science majors doubling in mathematics and getting a minor in physics? I have learned VERY little from this book. I don't even know how to write a for loop after two and a half months. The authors assume I already know everything they are talking about in this book...Oh, that's right, I forgot I already learned everything I need to know about recursive series in my freshman year of college! Of course, one sentence is plenty of explanation!! The presentation is extremely formal, and I really don't know who gave these authors the OK to call it an introductory book. That is hardly the case!