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by Erika Dyck

eBook Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus download ISBN: 0801889944
Author: Erika Dyck
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 216
ePub: 1439 kb
Fb2: 1991 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc lit mbr azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Medicine and Health Sciences

Erika Dyck shows how this led to its undoing. This book will be of interest to physicians, especially in psychiatry and neurology, and students of medical method and history.

Erika Dyck shows how this led to its undoing. A powerful media campaign directed a political solution – a complete ban and a felony for possession.

Psychedelic Psychiatry book. Start by marking Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Originally published in 2008 ‘Psychedelic Psychiatry – LSD from Clinic to. .Not campus to clinic.

Originally published in 2008 ‘Psychedelic Psychiatry – LSD from Clinic to Campus’ by the historian Erika Dyck is an excellent, scholarly study into an important slice of LSD history. Dyck deals brilliantly with the ensuing political battling both within the profession and without, in a very clear-minded and level-headed manner, which generally sums up the tone of the book. In conclusion, Psychedelic Psychiatry is an excellent history and will, no doubt, be an important text for anyone interested in LSD history and the psychiatric use of the drug.

Acid dreams: The complete social history of LS. Turning on in SaskatchewanDyck, Erika. Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus.

Acid dreams: The complete social history of LSD. M. A. Lee. B. Schlain. Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus June 2012.

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Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus.

The following pages reveal some of the connections between mental health, LSD and the wider setting, avoiding both ascension and declension narratives.

Historian Erika Dyck deftly recasts our understanding of LSD to show it as an experimental substance, a medical .

Historian Erika Dyck deftly recasts our understanding of LSD to show it as an experimental substance, a medical treatment, and a tool for exploring psychotic perspectives - as well as a recreational drug. The evolution of LSD from remedy to inebriating drug was, however, primarily promoted by the activities of Dr. Timothy Leary and Dr. Richard Alpert of Harvard University. Cohen, Sidney (1965)

Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD From Clinic to Campus. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. Ogden, . Wilby, . "LSD-25 and mescaline as therapeutic adjuvants. Cohen, Sidney (1965). Drugs of hallucination: The uses and misuses of lysergic acid diethylamide.

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LSD's short but colorful history in North America carries with it the distinct cachet of counterculture and government experimentation. The truth about this mind-altering chemical cocktail is far more complex―and less controversial―than generally believed.

Psychedelic Psychiatry is the tale of medical researchers working to understand LSD’s therapeutic properties just as escalating anxieties about drug abuse in modern society laid the groundwork for the end of experimentation at the edge of psychopharmacology. Historian Erika Dyck deftly recasts our understanding of LSD to show it as an experimental substance, a medical treatment, and a tool for exploring psychotic perspectives―as well as a recreational drug. She recounts the inside story of the early days of LSD research in small-town, prairie Canada, when Humphry Osmond and Abram Hoffer claimed incredible advances in treating alcoholism, understanding schizophrenia and other psychoses, and achieving empathy with their patients.

In relating the drug’s short, strange trip, Dyck explains how concerns about countercultural trends led to the criminalization of LSD and other so-called psychedelic drugs―concordantly opening the way for an explosion in legal prescription pharmaceuticals―and points to the recent re-emergence of sanctioned psychotropic research among psychiatric practitioners. This challenge to the prevailing wisdom behind drug regulation and addiction therapy provides a historical corrective to our perception of LSD’s medical efficacy.

Comments: (2)
Dominator
A must read to anybody seriously interested in psychedelic science. Tells the story of science with LSD and mescaline before the cultural revolution of the 60's, with Timothy Leary appearing only in the final part of the book. This is very welcome, once that many still think that pscychedelic science started in the 60s with Leary et al. This book makes the clear point this was not so, ant that many had done good work during the fifties. It also serves as a kind of tribute to pioneer Humphry Osmond, true inventor of the "psychedelic" word
monotronik
In the 1950s LSD presented as a drug of considerable promise in the understanding and treatment of mental illness. A great deal of research was done and published in leading journals. This changed abruptly in the mid-60s. “Acid” became identified with political radicalism and the counterculture, prompting a drastic revision in attitude. LSD was criminalized, no further medical investigations were permitted.

Erika Dyck’s short account focuses on Canada, in particular on Saskatchewan. Before the turnaround, the province became a global hub for work on LSD and related substances – psychedelic psychiatry.

She summarises ably the work that was done there and the problems faced in proving its effectiveness. Most obviously there was no possibility of a controlled trial with placebo – the effect of LSD was too obvious. But what really told against LSD was its rediscovery outside of the hospital as a recreational drug, closely associated with rebels and drop-outs. Erika Dyck shows how this led to its undoing. Pharmaceutical-grade LSD-25 made by Sandoz was associated with “acid” mixed by street chemists, medical research with campus parties. A powerful media campaign directed a political solution – a complete ban and a felony for possession.

The last decade has seen a renewal of interest in LSD. Studies are investigating its place in the treatment of a range of disorders. For now its use outside medical experiment is still illegal. For now. California, which legalised the medical use of marijuana in 1996, recently licensed the same for recreation and pleasure as well.

Numerous references direct the reader to original papers from the Saskatchewan project. They make clear that properly prepared and taken under medical direction, LSD is entirely safe. It remains now to show whether and in what conditions it is effective.

This book will be of interest to physicians, especially in psychiatry and neurology, and students of medical method and history.